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Jennifer Perron

Jun 9, 2015
08:04

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Hi Paul, Thanks for your proposal to the Climate CoLab. I'm one of the catalysts, helping provide comments and feedback to proposals, in an effort to help strengthen them. Thanks for sharing your idea of a new climate magazine. It may be helpful to expand upon this thought in the description and impact sections, detailing what type of content this magazine might include, who its target audience would be, and how it would help engage the public in this issue and empower future leadership. In the impact section, you would need to help draw the linkages to how this magazine could help impel concrete emissions reductions, perhaps through inclusion of tangible climate solutions in its content.

Paul Dryfoos

Jun 10, 2015
11:39

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Hi Jennifer- Thanks for your comment. We will post our full proposal in draft form by Thursday 6/11 at 6pm. I would really appreciate your facilitator review at that point, so that we can incorporate your comments before the submission deadline. A couple of practical questions: 1. We have developed some graphic exhibits in pdf file type to support our proposal. Is there a way to post these as documents, or do we need to host them on our own dropbox account? 2. Is there a formatting specification available for the optional graphic? 3. Is the character count strictly enforced? is it calculated with spaces, or actual characters only? I sent these questions yesterday through the contact button, but haven't received a response. Thanks-Paul

Elise Gibson

Jun 17, 2015
03:24

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I love the idea of using climate change itself as a magazine theme, which opens the editorial possibilities to so many approaches. Photos, solid science reporting, essays, practical service info, ideas for individual action, profiles of thought leaders, reports on technological answers, artistic responses—these all seem to have a place here. And the optimistic tone you describe is especially welcome.

Paul Dryfoos

Jun 18, 2015
10:36

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Elise- Thanks for your comment. We want to create a magazine that provides its audience with a truly enjoyable experience while helping them to meaningfully engage with climate solutions. This begins with design - making a magazine with strong rack appeal. Then the editorial content needs to be both engaging and empowering. What do you think of the article choices indicated on our cover mock-ups? Do you have other ideas for articles or editorial themes that would fit our concept?

Kathryn Alexander

Jun 19, 2015
01:45

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I would love to contribute. My work has been focused on how to assess the application of values to human interactions, particularly in business. I have an assessment based on three value systems, one of which is sustainable. The difference can be measured, the actions clarified and conscious change managed using assessment data. Kathryn Alexander ethical impact@gmail.com

Eva Fierst

Jun 19, 2015
05:57

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Brilliant idea to have an informative, positive, top-notch magazine that brings home the bigger picture but also engages people to take action. An online version is essential in order to attract a global readership.

Paul Dryfoos

Jun 20, 2015
09:15

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Eva- Thanks for your comment. We agree that an online version is needed. We see four components of the online presence. The first is a digital version of the magazine. The second is an associated website that serves as a canonical guide to information, organizations and resources relevant to the mission of the magazine, The third is a robust social media platform. The fourth is an on-line component of the New Climate advertising campaign. The advertising campaign will drive awareness of core themes, such as "Talk About Climate Change", and "If you've been waiting for a sign, climate change may be it." The first step is to develop a really strong prototype for the print magazine.Then we can build a comprehensive media presence with a great deal of focus and coherence. Best-Paul

Greg White

Jun 23, 2015
03:50

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I'm excited about this, too. There's a dearth of forums for good, innovative, and positive ideas. So much of climate change future is framed as catastrophist. Perhaps the idea is to scare people into action. But it has the opposite reaction. The better effort is to pool ideas with positive intentions. Today's release of the new Lancet report is a good example. http://nyti.ms/1H8wRcn It could/should be framed as an opportunity to improve public health in new ways. Good luck. I'm exited about your effort!

Paul Dryfoos

Jun 23, 2015
07:05

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Thanks Greg. I think it's important to acknowledge reality, and then move on to figuring out how we can take personal responsibility for the human response. Who/what are the role models, tools and resources that we have available. We think collective intelligence will be an important part of this story.

Ellen Moyer

Jun 24, 2015
09:04

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I’m excited by the concept of New Climate Magazine, especially its constructive tone. I would love to see New Climate Magazine become a resource not only accessed and relied upon by people around the world, but one that actively brings groups – even hard to reach groups - together to work collaboratively on this problem. For example, I believe it’s important to engage not only adults but children and help adults and children work together on climate change. Indigenous peoples around the world also tend to be left out - they are the primary recipients of devastating climate change impacts even though they had little or nothing to do with creating the problem. Climate change presents an unprecedented opportunity to bring humans of all ages and cultures together in a way that has never been seen before. I hope New Climate Magazine will facilitate this.

Danielj. Friedman

Jun 25, 2015
08:27

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This is an interesting an exciting proposal. I'm glad that you and your colleagues aim to increase interest in climate change activism, and that you're trying to expand the current narrow activist base. Looking at the table of contents for the first issue, I'm confident that the magazine will succeed. Good luck!

Adele Tonge

Jun 30, 2015
02:09

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Hello, Nice job on the proposal. I have no doubt that the magazine could be both beautiful and informative. My main question is: Who is the specific target audience? Reading through the descriptive material, it wasn't clear to me exactly who it is meant for. I believe clarifying that would make it easier to make suggestions for article ideas, placement or approaches. Is there a clearer demographic of who you are hoping to reach? My other question concerns the length of the publication in general. Are these short pieces or lengthy full articles? There is a lot of potential here for education, action and positive corporate involvement. I wish you great success. Best, Adele

Paul Dryfoos

Jul 15, 2015
11:02

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Adele- Audience definition is one of the key issues we addressed in our proposal revision. Here's where we went with it: "We need a million new local, national, and global climate leaders to drive this revolution. New Climate cultivates and empowers them with information, insights, tools, hope, and inspiration. This next wave of leaders is diverse: scientists, teachers, parents, activists, clergy, students, community organizers, and businesspeople, all unified by the desire to take more personal responsibility for climate change. They are you, your neighbors, friends and family. They are adults with families and careers who care about climate change but have competing priorities in their lives. New Climate connects this audience with climate change as a central reality of our lives, not some abstract scary concept inhabiting the periphery of our consciousness." Once we begin the next phase of development, for which this proposal seeks resources, we will do a much more in-depth market analysis as part of the planning process.

Todd Felton

Aug 3, 2015
04:40

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You have my support and -- looking forward to watching this important work take off.

Laura Mackay

Aug 4, 2015
10:16

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Thank you so much.

Howard Frumkin

Aug 18, 2015
01:42

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New Climate Magazine is a brilliant idea. As a health scientist I'm aware that we need both solid data and compelling ways to reach people. This is how we've made progress on many public health fronts, from smoking cessation to seat belt use to HIV prevention. We need to do it for climate change--perhaps the major public health challenge of this century. The combination of attractive design, succinct messaging and savvy placement can be a game-changer. I look forward to seeing the magazine!

Paul Dryfoos

Aug 19, 2015
08:02

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Dr. Frumkin-Thanks for your input. We are very interested in covering the impact of climate change on human health. Your observation that climate change is a monumental public health challenge just reinforces the importance of helping readers understand the dynamics. Also, in keeping with New Climate's emphasis on motivating readers to become involved in the human response to climate change, the example of successful public health campaigns may be highly relevant. Also, thanks for your expression of confidence in the concept for New Climate Magazine.

Neoka Naidoo

Aug 21, 2015
10:13

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Hi Climate Magazine team, Good job on getting this far. I do however feel that there is an aspect of your concept missing and that is transdisciplinary thinking. The fact of the matter is that people who would pick up the 'New Climate Magazinge' or whatever you intend to call it are already engaged or have and inkling of a broader sense of self. It is in my opinion, that the people who are oblivious of the consequences of their actions are the ones who need to be targeted. Climate science exists and it yes it can be difficult to understand sometimes, which is where you magazine comes in, but there are those that are stuck in short-termism mindset. Those are the people that need to under the responsibility we all have to address the longevity of our planet. All the best. I hope you take this into consideration. Neoka p.s I am South African. I have my BSc in Environmental Science and will shortly be completing my Post-Grad in Renewable Energy and Sustainable Development. I work at an NGO working in Climate Change and Energy Access and I specialize in policy and research in this field. Just a little background into who I am and what I do so that you understand the lens that I described in my above comment.

Susanne Moser

Aug 21, 2015
07:26

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It's not a small challenge to be real about the facts about climate change and all they imply, AND stay focused on a hopeful, practical, encouraging note! So kudos to you, just for starters, just for trying. it is maybe the greatest need for all of us to stay constructively engaged on climate change. If your efforts succeed, this may become the most needed journal in the history of humankind! Good luck! Susi

Grady Mcgonagill

Aug 23, 2015
12:39

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As someone who has recently become engaged in addressing climate change, I’m excited by the potential of New Climate magazine to inspire and motivate others to do the same. For years I had felt the need to do something about climate change, but didn’t quite know how. Finally, I was inspired to take action by the writing of Bill McKibben. Had there been a magazine like New Climate, I might have been inspired and guided sooner. New Climate’s vision of reaching the “next million” leaders seem to me just right. Now that a majority of Americans believe that climate change is real and caused primarily by humans, convincing skeptics is no longer a priority. Instead we need to inspire and support people who already know there’s a problem but haven’t yet taken a step to engage. The title of the magazine aptly reflects the potential I sense. It points to a “new climate” that augurs a fundamental shift in societal values. As the first lines of the summary state, “Climate change is the symptom, not the problem. The problem is that we have not yet learned how to live in balance with our planet.” The magazine will address the importance of a cultural transformation, while showing how our actions as individuals can bring that about. As a specialist in organizational behavior and individual transformation, I can attest that New Climate’s empowerment model is quite robust. I’m eager to see the results!

Paul Dryfoos

Aug 24, 2015
03:32

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Neoka, Susi and Grady, thanks for your comments. Neoka - You have raised a very important question about defining the intended audience for New Climate Magazine. The intended audience for the magazine is people who are already aware of and concerned about climate change, but have not made it a central priority of their lives to respond in a constructive way. We believe that there is plenty of great information already available in the media and in scholarly and professional literature, but it is overwhelming and not organized in a way that will empower people to become engaged in constructive climate action. Good luck with your work on climate change and energy access. Susi - Thank you for your encouraging words. Your article "Getting Real About It: Meeting the Psychological and Social Demands of a World in Distress" was a very important inspiration for this project. This article is full of wisdom about the interlocking psychological, political, economic and technological challenges presented by climate change. Link here: http://www.climateaccess.org/sites/default/files/Moser_Getting%20Real%20About%20It.pdf Grady- Thanks for comment, and especially your attention to the empowerment model that we have tried to imbed as the underlying organizing framework for the magazine. As you point out, we need a significant cultural transformation to get squarely focused on the emerging realities of climate change and other related planetary challenges.

Julie Michaels

Sep 4, 2015
08:37

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So much is happening today in the field of climate change—in transportation, building and design, energy creation and consumption, and agriculture—that I welcome a magazine that can report on it all. As much as we belive we can find all we need to know on the Internet, I welcome the concrete appearance of a printed magazine that we can read in our homes and pass along. If your goal is to reach and create new thought leaders, this is a very good path to that goal

Julie


Paul Dryfoos

Sep 7, 2015
10:45

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Julie - thanks for your comment. We will report on the cutting edge of climate solutions. Just as important, we will delve into the cutting edge of human potential. What are the emergent tools of learning, innovation and social organization that will enable our species to evolve in unprecedented ways to address unprecedented challenges? 

We agree with you that a beautifully realized print magazine has unique value for reaching out to an emerging constituency for climate action, drawing their attention to these exciting ideas, and helping them to become engaged in the human response to these challenges.


Paul Dryfoos

Sep 9, 2015
05:18

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Summation of Learning and Connecting through the CoLab

The New Climate Magazine proposal team would like to summarize the learning and connecting we have realized through our engagement in the CoLab process. Interaction with other CoLab participants has already proven invaluable to the development of a new kind of magazine for the next million climate leaders and activists. We decided to submit our vision for New Climate Magazine after working on it in whiteboard sessions for more than a year. We were ready to take the next step: engaging through the CoLab’s collective intelligence platform - a unique opportunity to engage with other creative thinkers.

We were not disappointed. Dozens of readers offered insights that have helped advance our thinking. Several thought leaders with deep experience in relevant disciplines and endeavors have agreed to be ongoing advisors as we proceed toward a full prototype of the magazine. Here are the key insights we would like to share with the judges, advisors and staff of the Shifting Attitudes and Behavior contest:

Audience:

New Climate Magazine is designed for a specific audience: people who realize that climate change is a problem but are not yet engaged in the necessary human response.

Our starting point is the 40% of Americans adults who report being alarmed or concerned about climate change (Yale/George Mason surveys). This translates to about 100 million people. Our goal is to reach and engage at least 1% of this cohort through the physical magazine and associated social media, advertising, collaborations with climate action organizations, and online outreach.

Commenters helped us realize that we had not articulated this audience well enough. We responded at the time but have since further refined our thinking:

New Climate empowers and mobilizes the concerned yet disengaged. This nascent wave of leaders and activists is diverse: scientists, teachers, parents, activists, clergy, students, community organizers, and businesspeople. They are you and your neighbors, friends, and family. They are adults with children and careers who care about climate change but have competing priorities in their lives. We believe that given information, insights, tools, hope, and inspiration, these concerned citizens will be ready to take more personal responsibility for climate change and to be part of designing a sustainable future, whether they act locally or on the world stage, in their families, communities, industries, and political sphere.

Once we begin the next phase of project development, we will do an in-depth market analysis. We look forward to sharing thinking with the climate communication experts at George Mason, Yale, and elsewhere on how to segment, reach, and engage this audience.

How New Climate Magazine is different:

Several commenters noted that there are already way too many climate magazines, blogs, websites, journals, etc. One reader, a faculty member at a leading university and a former public official, emailed this comment (elided):

"It is an interesting concept and it has potential to garner an audience. My only suggestion is that you spend more time identifying your audience. People in my position are overwhelmed by reading material…. I have cancelled subscriptions to terrific journals and magazines ... You need to ask, what is the magazine that my reader will discard in order to read this magazine. Why focus on a new magazine rather than a new blog or internet publication?"

Our response (elided):

You put your finger on one of our greatest challenges…. You are probably not representative of our primary audience, which is people who are concerned about climate change in a nagging back-of-the-mind kind of way, but not really engaged in the issue. That's why we're focusing on lively design, point-of-sale distribution, human potential as it relates to climate change, and specific actions that individuals can take to engage with collective actions . . . We think, and have gotten some feedback, that what we've laid out is a bit different from what's already out there.

We are very deliberately focusing on print as our cornerstone medium precisely because information overload has become endemic with on-line media. I don't think we could capture the intended audience and hold their attention for more than five minutes online…. There is some good research out there pointing to the advantages of print for attention and cognition.

This exchange captures much of how we view the unique position of New Climate Magazine as an antidote to the daily bombardment of information.

The specific areas of differentiation:

  • New Climate uses print as a starting point as a means of reaching a different audience and facilitating attention and cognition in a way that is difficult online.
  • New Climate is a human potential magazine focused on climate change. We regard climate change as a symptom of a global culture that has yet to incorporate ecological boundaries into norms of belief and behavior. We celebrate the power of human learning, innovation, and conscious evolution, and we connect readers to such emerging tools as collective intelligence, global connectivity, online learning, collaborative innovation, and transnational cooperation.
  • The magazine and its larger communications enterprise are built around an explicit empowerment framework. We recently asked a highly regarded expert on organizational behavior and individual transformation to review our empowerment model. His response: "The magazine will address the importance of a cultural transformation, while showing how our actions as individuals can bring that about. As a specialist in organizational behavior and individual transformation, I can attest that New Climate’s empowerment model is quite robust."
  • New Climate incorporates a storytelling formula that has been proven effective at holding attention and helping audiences identify with virtuous action in venues as diverse as Disney movies and TED talks.
  • New Climate is designed primarily for a popular audience of potential climate leaders and activists—the millions of people who are concerned and alarmed, but not yet engaged. We expect that people who live and breathe climate solutions, such as our CoLab colleagues, will also find the magazine compelling.
  • The print magazine will be our cornerstone, but we intend to build out an integrated presence across traditional and new media in conjunction with collaborating organizations.

 

Comments from potential collaborators, informants and supporters:

The New Climate project team decided to participate in CoLab as a means of vetting our ideas and connecting with a broad cross-section of relevant experts and thought leaders. We have been very pleased with the result and appreciate both the input and the offers of collaboration. Here is some of the relevant input:

Dr. Howard Frumkin, dean of the University of Washington School of Public Health, IPCC co-author, and former Special Assistant to the CDC Director for Climate Change and Health.

"When I started reading your email I was doubtful. What, another new climate organization? Another magazine? But after reading your note and the web page, I’m sold. I’m a magazine reader and subscriber, and this is definitely one I’d read. I think others will too, lots of others. I don’t know of anything like it. We need to get the ideas out there, and I think this will be a big step forward in doing so.

New Climate Magazine is a brilliant idea. As a health scientist I'm aware that we need both solid data and compelling ways to reach people. This is how we've made progress on many public health fronts, from smoking cessation to seat belt use to HIV prevention. We need to do it for climate change--perhaps the major public health challenge of this century. The combination of attractive design, succinct messaging and savvy placement can be a game-changer. I look forward to seeing the magazine!"

Susanne Moser, PhD, is an internationally recognized expert on adaptation to climate change, vulnerability, resilience, climate change communication, social change, decision support and the interaction between scientists, policy-makers and the public. Her article “Getting Real About It: Meeting the Psychological and Social Demands of a World in Distress was an early and powerful inspiration for this project.

"It's not a small challenge to be real about the facts about climate change and all they imply, AND stay focused on a hopeful, practical, encouraging note! So kudos to you, just for starters, just for trying. It is maybe the greatest need for all of us to stay constructively engaged on climate change. If your efforts succeed, this may become the most needed journal in the history of humankind!"

Grady McGonagill is an organizational consultant specializing in building capacity for learning and change. He has mentored many organizations in leadership development and developing a culture of learning and coaching. He is co-author of several books on learning organizations.

"New Climate’s vision of reaching the “next million” leaders seem to me just right. … we need to inspire and support people who already know there’s a problem but haven’t yet taken a step to engage.... The magazine will address the importance of a cultural transformation, while showing how our actions as individuals can bring that about. As a specialist in organizational behavior and individual transformation, I can attest that New Climate’s empowerment model is quite robust. I’m eager to see the results!"

Ellen Moyer, PhD, is an environmental engineer with more than 30 years of experience and an environmental journalist/blogger. Recent articles cover culture, demographics, and climate change.

"I’m excited by the concept of New Climate Magazine, especially its constructive tone…. Climate change presents an unprecedented opportunity to bring humans of all ages and cultures together in a way that has never been seen before. I hope New Climate Magazine will facilitate this."

Project advisory group:

Collaboration with leaders of thought and action from the diverse disciplines relevant to climate mobilization is absolutely critical to this project. We have reached out to several old and new colleagues to advise us through the six-month prototype and business development phase described in the proposal. Advisors will share their ideas, help build linkages with other organizations, and review draft planning documents and content.

To date, the following people have agreed to serve as project advisors:

 Dr. Howard Frumkin (bio in previous section)

 Grady McGonagill (bio in previous section)

Dr. Mark Trexler has advised clients around the world on climate change risk and risk management for more than 25 years. He is the founder of ClimateWeb, a knowledge management database of climate change information, incorporating relevant knowledge across the behavioral, social, and physical sciences using advanced mind mapping and visualization tools.

Vanessa Rule is founder and organizing director of Mothers Out Front, an activist organization that has grown from a small group of mothers discussing climate change to a regional network of hundreds of organizers working toward clean energy.

Julie Michaels is a seasoned magazine editor. She was a founding editor of New England Monthly and has had significant editing responsibilities at the Boston Globe, including Sunday op-ed page, associate editor of the Sunday magazine, and redesign of several special sections.

Reverend Margaret Bullit-Jones is an Episcopal priest, writer, retreat leader, and climate activist. She serves as "missioner for creation care" in the diocese of Western Massachusetts, where she seeks to inspire and support a wave of religious activism in and beyond the diocese that will address the climate crisis and deepen reverence for God’s creation. 

We are grateful to these amazing people for engaging with the project and offering their expertise and insights. We will continue to build our advisory group as the project progresses.

Scope of our CoLab proposal:

This proposal is to fund the development of a working prototype of the magazine, build a network of experts and supporters, and develop a comprehensive business plan. The time frame for this process is approximately six months from the go date. Details in the original proposal.

What we need to move the project forward:

The CoLab proposal for New Climate Magazine identifies a need for approximately $150,000 of seed funding for the prototyping phase described above. The proposal team is prepared to serve as the core project management, networking, and creative team. However, this is a big idea that can only work with a great deal of collaboration with individuals and organizations whose vision and goals mesh with ours. The project will need:

  • Partnerships with climate action organizations
  • A strong editorial board populated with experts and thought leaders from across the spectrum of relevant disciplines and approaches
  • Content generators and creative contributors
  • Business partners with financial, production, distribution, and administrative capacities
  • Funders and underwriters

 

We have already made progress in developing some of these important collaborative relationships and look forward to expanding these horizons as the project moves forward. The judges’ designation as a project winner would enhance our credibility and open doors as we pursue development of the strongest possible collaborative network. We'll need nothing less to engage a million new climate activists.

 


Vanessa Rule

Sep 11, 2015
10:36

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New Climate is a promising new tool for giving people who are concerned about the climate crisis, but are not currently active, a clear pathway to action.  This is critical at a time when it's going to everyone from every field and sector of our society to work together to build a resilient and just future. Our success depends on our ability to collaborate with each other and provide an positive and aspirational vision of the future we can create together if we set our hands, hearts and head to it.  Mothers Out Front is eager to see this project become reality and to help leverage its potential to create the change we need and want.


Paul Dryfoos

Sep 11, 2015
12:00

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Thanks Vanessa. We admire the work that Mothers Out Front does to mobilize for clean energy and climate responsibility. Thanks for agreeing to serve on our interim advisory group for New Climate Magazine. We look forward to working with you on development of the prototype for the magazine.


James Lau

Dec 11, 2015
01:08

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This proposal workshop entry seems to attract most comments. This may be the best place for my comments.

I am proposing "Cost Effective OTEC for Electrical Power plant" in the MIT alumni contest even though I am not MIT alumni. I know my entry has been posted. Please read my entry and use the contact information to contact me. I am ready to contribute a paper to this magazine. OTEC is an 130 years old proposal that has not been properly developed. I know US government has spent several billion dollars on OTEC. Hawaii renewable energy lab seems to be one imprtant agency for OTEC work. I cannot see Hawaii lab really doing anything significant for the last 5 years. I am in touch with people there to see if I can get them moving in the right direction.

Ocean thermal energy is the most abundance stored renewable energy resource on earth. The store thermal energy in the top 1000 meter depth is equivalent to two years of solar energy transmitted to earth. The sun is transmitting 5000 time the energy need by all human on earth. Stored thermal energy quantity is greater than all fossil fuel under recovery consideration. Of cource, if we burn fossil at our current rate for 100 years, the carbon dioxide level in the atmosphere  will be at 1000 ppm level (now only at 400 ppm level). The energy problem is solved with the global warming problem as replacement. The average global temperature increase surely will be more than 5 C.

The Paris climate conference cannot hope to make any impact on global warming because they ignored the most abundant renewable energy resource on earth.


Dan Tefft

Mar 2, 2016
05:48

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Thank you Paul and team for a fabulous idea.

As you mentioned, and we all know, the number of data sources and stories about the problems associated with climate change are overwhelming. I believe your focus on stories about successful mitigation strategies, adaptation and SOLUTIONS represents the evolutionary shift that must happen in order for humanity to leave a healthy environment to future generations.

Regardless of whether your proposal wins this contest I would like to contribute to its implementation. 


Alison Halderman

Mar 12, 2016
07:13

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Hi...dear creators, can you give us an update so we know you are current and involved in this spring round? You have a big idea I agree with, and the kind of team to think big. Lots of resources and support. Would love to hear what is happening now. 

Questions: are there smaller versions you could start with to reach out to your demographic? How can you interest them in looking at and staying with your stories (what did I miss in trying to read through the mass of material you provided?) Tell me the psychology, what your demographic is thinking/feeling, why not engaged and what about your magazine will engage them? Tell me in one paragraph or two.

Thanks! And by the way, if you get this magazine going, maybe you could have a lighter section, "Lifestyle" or ?. Reviews of ecofiction entertainment (books/movies), a crossword puzzle, a short profile of an individual living some piece of the puzzle, like "Lifestyles of the Green and Happy" &or a Home and Garden section. Maybe you already suggested these, but thought I would if not in the comments or proposal somewhere.

Alison Halderman (Ecofiction Challenge in this contest)


Leann Siefferman

Mar 28, 2016
02:24

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Yes, let us know if this idea is active for the 2016 proposal "season" as I am extremely interested in contributing to its implementation. This is a fantastic idea with a lot of potential.


Paul Dryfoos

Apr 6, 2016
11:08

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Hello Dan, Alison and LeAnn-

Thanks for your interest in New Climate Magazine, and I apologize for taking so long to post a response. We have had dozens of key informant meetings over the past six months, done some significant work to refine and expand the concept, and yes - we do plan to participate in the spring round. We will be posting a revised version by 5/1. 

Dan- We would love to talk to you about participating in implementation.

Alison - Excellent questions. We are working on a presentation deck that addresses these and other questions, and will share it with you in the next several weeks. I love your ideas about ecofiction and lifestyle. We want this to be a climate change magazine that people actually want to read, so artistic and literary expression, and "lifestyle" info  will be very important components. We would get your input on this as we move forward.

LeAnn - We look forward to your input on the updated proposal.

Best-Paul Dryfoos, Co-Creator

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