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James Greyson

Nov 25, 2012
07:21

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Great example of a proposal covering all sections in the proposal template. I like the wide range of proposal ideas brought together in synergy. How do salt bricks work for building? Crumbly/soluble? C2C practice would eliminate most sewage and nitrate runoff that was mentioned. Is the 6X in the title a 'factor 6' resource efficiency aim? A helpful related proposal from last year, https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/4/planId/14612

Mark Hurych

Nov 27, 2012
02:13

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My intent is to use a sort of collective divergent thinking to broaden the possibilities. Mycelium growth and biochar for soil development should be explored together, for example. Salt bricks are in need of research to be efficient, but have been used to construct hotels and furniture. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palacio_de_Sal I'm sorry for my "tweet-speak." "6X" refers to this Anthropocene period, otherwise known as "sixth mass extinction." I meant Permaculture and C2C as philosophical perspectives instead of specific fixed procedures. The idea is to constantly look for opportunities to close resource loops and prevent vectors toward landfill. As for the earlier proposal about crops with seawater: a thousand times yes. All of this kind of thinking is pointing in a good direction and needs attention.

Briana Lyon

Dec 4, 2012
02:23

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I love the idea of rethinking our waterway structures. Right now it seems like most major waterways in North America serve as controlled energy generators that flow at ascending speeds straight out to sea. By developing stream meandering, ponds and water catchments off of our polluted, eroding rivers we can capture large amounts of nutrients (especially nitrogen), pollutants and topsoil that would otherwise be lost to sea. Surrounding these catchments with appropriate plant communities will be an important part of ensuring toxin removal, nutrient harvesting and soil stability. Annually dredging the mud from the bottoms of the catchments would create a valuable soil compost for use in agriculture, as has been practiced in China for thousands of years. Waterways can be used for so much more than dams.

Henning Koch

Mar 15, 2013
05:52

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I wish similar creativity could be applied to mega-projects currently under way, such as in China and for instance the Belo Monte dam in Brazil. It would be interesting if a group of progressive scientists would come up with a "What we would have done" scenario for Belo Monte - to analyze the Xingu River and how one could have better generated energy for it and encouraged community development. I would love to publicize such "What if...?" suggestions as a way of constructively criticizing regressive development. For more information please see https://www.facebook.com/FutureAmazonia

Pia Jensen

Mar 28, 2013
11:26

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I'm clueless on many of your ideas, but I think they sound viable, though I am unclear on the Colorado River aspects (crossing jurisdictions - not just countries, but states - with differing laws regarding access and use of the water may pose some big hurdles. I'm a regular follower of news on radiation from Fukushima and have to ask - do you have ideas on how to mitigate radiation on the ocean on the "agricultural" zones you propose? I can provide references on ocean contamination if you need.

Mark Hurych

Apr 20, 2013
11:19

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Socrates-Gone-Wild, hi. Meandering waterways of a sort is what I have in mind. Sea water would meander through Mexico up from the Gulf of California. That's in Mexico (Gulf of California) and a gravity flow would supply their "Laguna Salada" salt flats and then our Salton Sea. The rest would be for everyone who wanted to build wetlands fish farms in the desert. Our climate is wildly hot. I have experienced 117 degrees Fahrenheit at times during my 25 years here and we count days over 110 in July as a measure of how hot the summer is. The problem with the Salton Sea is that it has an over abundance of salt and nutrient runoff already. It is the runoff destination for all our agriculture here in this county but it is still evaporating faster than the water is flowing in. We already steal the vast majority of the Colorado River by way of the All American Canal, which waters and quenches the thirst of the desert Imperial Valley. If you look at the size comparison of San Diego Harbor and Salton Sea on a satellite image, you might understand why I cringe at the thought of wasting this potential resource. It's about 250,000 acres or roughly 300 square miles.

Mark Hurych

Apr 21, 2013
12:26

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henning-koch: I love "what if" questions. I have very similar wishes about certain "mega-projects" that I hear are created and promoted in the USA. Some people have the strange idea that billions of dollars ought to be spent on "terra-forming" Mars! I say, hey, let's terra-form Earth, and while we're at it, let's put the same passion into that as we would in a Mars expedition! Maybe there should be a "What if" X Prize. I think there is so much untapped creativity that needs to be highlighted. Mark Hurych

Mark Hurych

Apr 21, 2013
12:31

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pj: The fresh water from the canal is already ours (USA) and the runoff is already ours too. Saltwater gravity flow to supply and expand a solar powered desalinization wetland, well, that hasn't been tried yet. The only real difficulty in any of it is the sharing part, as we would need Mexico and USA to share sea water gravity flow and share work-around technology fixes as this new resource is expanded and scaled up. All boundaries are conventions. As are limits. We are wasting time by not reversing climate change faster. If similar projects were done around the world, we could help lower sea level or at least limit its rise. I'm looking at satellite images of North Africa, California, et al. Costa Rica, eh? Enjoy Mark Hurych ps I will work on the radioactive fallout problem in ocean plants and sea life, especially as food source. Hmm.

Pia Jensen

Jun 18, 2013
10:52

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Awesome good on you (looking into rads) :) Now in Nicaragua, CR getting too expensive... my ag/forestry entry represents group I volunteer for now. The Nicaragua reforestation plan. I agree with you - boundaries are conventions - and they shouldn't matter in the case of extreme climate change.

2013ag/forestryjudges 2013ag/forestryjudges

Jul 3, 2013
02:20

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A really interesting idea, but probably should be tested first with a small scale interactive model. Climate impact is not clear.

Mark Hurych

Jul 9, 2013
08:40

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Climate impact is largely a function of how much carbon stays in the ground on the planet. (We're at 400ppm CO2 right now in the atmosphere BTW.) My point in proposing this idea is not to start my own business venture. My point is that we're ALREADY experimenting with global ecological systems, at significant existential risk for humanity. As a thought experiment, suppose NASA started with projects like this intending to "terra-form" THIS planet and ensure its habitability for centuries to come. In that context, my project would be a SMALL one. Mitigating sea level rise around the world helps. (But only if similar projects are started soon world-wide.) While I absolutely agree that my idea's climate impact is not clear, our collective window of opportunity is not clearly delineated either. I consider 2010 to 2015 an appropriate time for humanity to jump at the chance to fix global system imbalances, since tipping points have not yet been reached. I think we are taking this opportunity for granted. I personally do not care whether this particular idea is used. I simply want humanity to act, facing potential doom, and say, "Not on my watch." My thinking is counter-intuitive to the "I-want-to-do-my-part" mentality. I believe that we, all humanity, collectively, have to act soon and in a big way. CTD cancer patients are routinely given pain meds and sent home to wait. That does not strike me personally as a solution.