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Rita Marteleira

Mar 7, 2016
06:04

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Hi Martin,

Thank you for submitting your proposal to Climate CoLab Adaptation Contest.

The gender inequality issues are front-line and have a real connection to climate change issues (as do so other various social matters).Regarding your proposal, I would advise you to include more of the proposed actions on the summary - it is too much focused on explaining the gender issues and does not address your concrete actions. Moreover, it is extremely relevant that you enhance (along the proposal) the connection between your case study and climate change adaptation (!)

Plus, I would add a paragraph explaining what is Cassava, and why do you think that cultivating it could reverse the existing problem. Meaning: what evidence do you have that it could have benefits for both gender issues and CC adaptation perspectives? Is it a profitable enough crop to support these women empowerment?

Let us know if you need any more suggestions.Keep up the good work!

Best,Rita


Diptanu Chaudhuri

Mar 9, 2016
04:34

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WE CAN GO FOR ROOFTOP PLANTATION IN EACH AND EVERY BUILDING AND ALSO IN VEHICLES ALL OVER INDIA ,IT WILL FIGHT POLLUTION,CLIMATE CHANGE , POVERTY ETC.Example:A TAXI DRIVER IN KOLKATA HAS ENCOURAGED EVERY ONE IN INDIA WITH ROOFTOP PLANTATION IN HIS OWN TAXI.
FRANCE HAD ALREADY MADE A LAW THAT EACH AND EVERY BUILDING SHOULD HAVE EITHER ROOFTOP PLANTATION OR SOLAR PANELS,THIS WILL HELP US TO CREATE A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT ESPECIALLY IN CITIES .WE CAN HAVE ROOFTOP PLANTATION IN GOVT BUILDINGS, BUSES ,TRAINS ETC.


Natalie Unterstell

Apr 3, 2016
10:32

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Thank you very much for this proposal.

This is a very promissing action however an important clarification is needed.

As we are talking about a warmer future and less predictable rainfall pattern, it would be important to check with agriculture experts

how cassava behaves in the projected climate scenarios.

Best


Martin Kailie

Apr 8, 2016
12:51

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Thanks so much for the comment. Cassava is drought resistant. The crop survives for months without rain and continue growing again as soon as it rains. It can do well in warmer temperatures and degraded soils.

Regards,

Martin


Martin Kailie

Apr 8, 2016
01:37

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Hi Rita,

Kindly take a look at the proposal again. I would like to know whether I the proposal answers all your great questions.

Thanks for your time.

Regards,

Martin 


Rita Marteleira

Apr 13, 2016
06:45

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Thank you Martin,

yes I think your proposal has improved significantly regarding my questions.

Keep up the good work!

Rita


Natalie Unterstell

May 8, 2016
06:58

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Thanks MArtin. Can you please literature references on this regard? Best


Rita Marteleira

May 17, 2016
02:06

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Dear proposal author(s)

Thank you again for submitting your proposal to the adaptation contest.

Just a friendly reminder: you only have 6 days left to update and improve your proposal before the contest closure on May 23rd! 

Keep up the good work and let us know if you have any queries!

Best wishes,

Rita Marteleira

Adaptation Contest Fellow


Laurie Ashley

May 20, 2016
09:06

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First, thank you for an excellent proposal.  Next, I would like to understand what the barriers are to achieving this.  It seems like such a sound idea that I'm surprised it isn't already more prevalent.  If women are to take up more productive cassava farming-- do they have access to land?  What are the other barriers they face?  I think it's critical to understand the existing barriers thoroughly to ensure that the project addresses them.


Patrick Ray

May 23, 2016
10:09

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Martin,

Last day to make refinements to the proposal. Looking forward to seeing the final version.

Am I correct in my understanding of your proposal - you propose helping with the uptake of Cassava as a climate-resilient crop through the development of cooperatives and access to relevant information and markets? Are there loans or other investment required to help women access the raw materials for planting and cultivation?

Good luck.


Sergio Pena

May 23, 2016
09:41

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Dear Martin, as pointed out in another proposal, the legal side of this solution might be necessary to address. For example, land to be used (public, private), the mandatory character of the proposal and possible tax exemption help with cassava. Excellent proposal. Cheers


Martin Kailie

Jun 15, 2016
05:30

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Judges and Fellows,

Many thanks for moving my proposal to the semi-finals, and also for all the comments and suggestions! Please see if I have been able to respond to them. Thanks for supporting my proposal. I feel more confident in my inspiration to help build resilience in my communities and beyond.

Regards, Martin 


Martin Kailie

Jun 25, 2016
12:07

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This is very simple and feasible. We are talking about taking up a new crop, that the farmers already know how to cultivate on a subsistence scale. The new thing is to support the farmers to organize cooperatives (around cassava as an adaptation crop) and connect them to local and international markets. Currently, the main barriers include the lack of access of rural poor to climate information, education, finance, markets. The farmers must know how and why cassava can help them adapt to climate, and support them to set up cassava plantations as small farm businesses.


Martin Kailie

Jul 7, 2016
09:53

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The comments and suggestions of the Fellows, Catalysts and Judges have helped to fully develop the concept of Eco-Cassava. They have helped me consider the land issues, social, political and ecological conditions that could be important for, or could be affected by the project. MIT Climate Co-Lab is a great place to build a project!   


Dimoir Quaw

Jul 29, 2016
06:29

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Dear Martin (africa4green) and Rita (rmarteleira)

As a man of West African descent born in the United Kingdom, I will make a wholly unscientific statement and say that Cassava or “Gari” as it is called in Ghana is “the food of the gods”.

In response to Rita…"Is it a profitable enough crop to support these women empowerment?"

… I was raised on gari.

1.       Gritty in consistency until mixed with water to become dough-like in consistency (“fuffu”), it is readily prepared as food with warm or hot water and eaten with fish, pepper sauce and stew.

2.       The meal once eaten in the morning can sustain one for a day… with fruits and water as a light top-up during the day.

3.       I personally eat it before travelling as it very filling and energy-providing

4.       It is ideal whilst sailing or camping since it can be prepared with a small quantity of water and eaten with canned fish and pepper sauce (all ingredients have a long shelf-life)

5.       It is ideal in food shortage situations (It sustained me for a week or so whilst moored on the river Ijser solo sailing).

You must try it Rita!

Martin, you have my vote for this popular crop. Indestructible as Cassava is, my proposal can offer more land utilisation for crop growth by reducing solar power plant size.

Please review and vote for my proposal if you agree with my case.

https://www.climatecolab.org/contests/2016/energy-supply/c/proposal/1316801

Thanks

Dimoir

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