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Kimberly King

Apr 7, 2014
09:45

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Indeed, I think telling the story in a manner that the general audience can digest is paramount. If we scientists expect the general population to change carbon emitting behaviors and start taking personal inventory on what they can do to change their lifestyle habits, then the story needs to be crafted in a manner that resonates with the respective audience. This climate instability story also needs to be sans religion and politics. And for each geographically predisposed/affected area, there needs to be a storyteller spokesperson who has a similar frame of reference with the audience to whom they want to share their experience.

Doron Bracha

Apr 30, 2014
01:18

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Good idea and beautiful music :-) I think most people mainly react to big events or natural disasters like hurricane Katrina, where the devastation and suffering are immense and obvious. Smaller events are often taken for granted, as a natural part of life on Earth. This initiative at its current format may only reach a certain kind of people, who probably already know and care about the environment. Perhaps you can think of ways to reach out to other parts of the general public, including those who are ignorant or indifferent, perhaps even in denial, and try to express the urgency and the seriousness of the matter. Telling personal stories is great in many ways, but perhaps it can be supplemented by some big picture stories (like how the global warming affects all life on the planet, how fresh water and arable land are becoming more scarce, how natural disasters are becoming more frequent and severe, how air pollution causes disease and even death etc.). In order to raise awareness and educate people to consider the environment in every thing they do, a combination of personal stories and the big picture may help. Cheers !..

Gabriel Harp

May 4, 2014
02:29

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Great concept! Great start! The stories themselves are one thing, but connecting them with the right audience is another. Not all stories are as meaningful to everyone. Maybe there's a way to identify groups of stories that would appeal to different groups of like-minded individuals. It would amplify the impact and the personal relevance of the stories themselves.

Gabriel Harp

May 4, 2014
02:01

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Also, you mention, "My goal is to create a worldwide network of climate stories which illustrates the common but unique human experiences of climate change." Research has shown that when it comes to climate change, there's no such thing as common sense. What this means is that hat makes sense to some people, doesn't makes sense to others. It's entirely possible that while everyone has unique experiences, those experiences aren;t as common as we would like to believe. Thus, one approach is to bundle stories that "make sense" for some people into one group and stories that "makes sense" for others into another group.

Shannon Cosentino-roush

Jun 14, 2014
03:22

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I think that this is a fantastic idea and you are well on the way to creating something with the serious potential to resonate with people of all walks of life. Unlike the above comment, I believe that your approach is exactly what is needed. We already hear from the news and other media sources about how climate change is predicted to impact our global environment, from more frequent storms to coastal inundation from sea level rise to fresh water shortages. What is missing from the global conversation is the human element. It widely is known that humans relate to humans. We understand issues better when we can put a face to a story. Regardless of the improved scientific evidence, the occurrence of hurricanes etc., many people still fail to understand the seriousness and urgency related to climate change. If we can show people that real changes are being felt, by real people, then perhaps we can bridge the political divide. I do think that it is important to report on a wide-range of views and to report from similar perspectives across locations, but what I think is most important is to keep the dynamic element of story telling. It has captured people's imaginations from the beginning of humanity and sadly our current society has lost/is losing this art. We already have well-analyzed data and reports, what we need is a different medium to convey information and I hope that you succeed in this, staying true to the creativity in approach that is so desperately needed. Thanks and I will be waiting to hear!

Vishal Bhavsar

Jun 15, 2014
01:20

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This is fascinating approach to deal with climate change. The means of stories and music can have far greater reach and impact than any other form of communication. In fact stories from most vulnerable geography and their stories and form of music can enlighten people across world and also raise importance of global commitment to deal with climate change. These stories and music can be used as messenger in the global conferences and it should make negotiators and government take firm decisions to deal with climate change. All the best!

Dan Whittet

Jun 17, 2014
11:03

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The personal transcends the political, it's why we will stop and help a friend or a neighbor regardless of how we might feel about their views. Stories, narratives of the impact of change and what that change meant to a person could be the best proposal I have seen so far. The story of a child in the Philippines whose family was destroyed, of a rancher and his cattle, of how shifting markets and changing access to water have created strife. I have asked to be a part of this proposal, I think it is a profoundly simple but powerful way to change opinion and awareness. How about beginning with an index of categories, like an anthology might.

Jason Davis

Jun 17, 2014
05:42

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Thanks everyone for your support and constructive feedback! I welcome any help with this project, especially technical development, outreach, and fundraising. I'm going to be taking part in the EE Capacity Community Climate Change Fellowship and will be working on the project at the upcoming training session in West Virginia. http://www.eecapacity.net/ccc-fellowship.html

Paulo Borges De Brito

Jun 20, 2014
01:15

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I believe society needs more projects like that.

Stefan Pasti

Jun 21, 2014
11:27

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I believe this is an important project which should be given much support, here and elsewhere. Here are two examples of how this “collecting stories” practice has been beneficial in other challenge areas: 1) In the peacebuilding field, one of the most well known practices [which provides much diffusing of tension between conflict groups (from high school gang members to residents in countries which are in conflict in the MidEast)] is the exchanging of life stories. In both basic and complex conflicts, negative stereotypes of the “other” add to the polarization of groups, and contribute to the intractability of the conflict. The exchanging of life stories can humanize the “other”, and help bring to forefront of discussion the common ground all people have, whether it be in the damage category (suffering of children, family life, work life) or in the aspiration category (pursuing education, arts, spiritual fellowship)—and thus highlight the common humanity of both groups. 2) The sharing of stories is also commonly used among interfaith groups, to help overcome isolation and negative stereotyping among people from different faiths. One example in popular culture is the “Speaking of Faith” radio program: From Wikipedia: (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_Being) “On Being (formerly known as Speaking of Faith with Krista Tippett) is a weekly public radio program about "religion, meaning, ethics, and ideas". Initially launched as a monthly broadcast in 2001 with Minnesota Public Radio, the program became a national weekly broadcast in 2003 airing on NPR stations across the United States. Operating from a neutral position, the program explores the relationship between religion and the human experience around the world.” From the “On Being” website (http://www.onbeing.org/about) “On Being is a Peabody Award-winning public radio conversation and podcast, a Webby Award-winning website and online exploration, a publisher and public event convener. On Being opens up the animating questions at the center of human life: What does it mean to be human, and how do we want to live? We explore these questions in their richness and complexity in 21st-century lives and endeavors. We pursue wisdom and moral imagination as much as knowledge; we esteem nuance and poetry as much as fact. “On Being is the home of the Civil Conversations Project, an emergent approach to new conversation and relationship across the differences of our age. On Being’s listeners, readers, and online communities cross boundaries that separate them in the culture at large: generational, socioeconomic, political, religious. They report that On Being equips them to relate in fresh, new ways to different others, and emboldens them to engage in new kinds of service.”

Gāius Jūlius Caesar

Jun 23, 2014
11:11

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Can you tell me the difference between your news of Climate Stories and news of others Climate channel , web , magazine ?

Jason Davis

Jun 24, 2014
10:28

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Thank you for the question. Climate Stories Project will be an interactive forum for sharing spoken reactions to climate change and its effects on people, communities, and the environment. It will be structured so people can upload, discuss, and share stories from around the world, as opposed to stories chosen and edited by journalists. I hope to broaden the conversation to move climate change from an abstract threat into a present reality, and also allow people to share their responses and adaptations to climate change.

Yanjun Cai

Jul 19, 2014
11:18

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A wonderful way to tell the climate story. We certainly need more proposals/projects that provide the bridge between science and humanity.

Stephen Siperstein

Jul 19, 2014
08:50

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Jason, This is a fantastic and much-needed intervention into climate change communication and climate change discourse in general. It is so important that the public understand climate change through many narrative frameworks, and it is also critical that all people are given the opportunity to tell their climate change stories. For the past five years I have been collecting, studying, and analyzing the many types of climate change stories being communicated in our society, whether in the form of novels, films, political discourse, or in the more personalized (and oftentimes private) forms of blog posts, personal testimonies, and even everyday conversations. Climate change discourse has come to be dominated by certain narratives--the narratives of climate denialism (which are narratives of climate change as some kind of left wing conspiracy), the narratives of climate science (which are narratives of climate change as a global phenomenon), the narratives of climate cinema (which are usually narratives of climate apocalypse), etc. Sometimes these narratives are useful, as in the global narratives of climate science. And sometimes these narratives are downright pernicious, as in the conspiracy narratives of climate deniers. However, either way it is so crucial to create venues through which other stories--more personalized stories--can be disseminated and shared. Story-telling and the power of narrative in general is one crucial component to climate change education that often gets overlooked in the "information-deficit" model (that is, the idea that the problem is people simply do not have enough information about climate change). The "information-deficit" model misses the emotional component. And this is where this project you've proposed here is so important. I have come across many other similar story-telling projects, but this is the first I have seen to involve music. This is also a crucial intervention because of the importance of beauty and aesthetics. It's oftentimes not just about the stories themselves but about presenting them in emotionally powerful forms. I think it would be fantastic to try to develop other components of such a project to transform such stories into performance; or in other words, to allow people to share their climate change stories in embodied ways (e.g. through group meetings, live story-telling performances, etc.) I would be thrilled to help in any way I can or be involved in this project, and I would be interested in talking more about it with you. - Stephen

Ken Eklund

Jul 21, 2014
03:48

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Great project idea. I'm reminded of the Tumblr "We Are The 99%" which was so influential so quickly in raising the question of income inequality in America. Would be happy to help in any way I can! – Ken

Climate Colab

Aug 5, 2014
08:45

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This is a useful approach. Much about climate is couched in data, statistics and visuals rather than in stories that describe individual’s experiences. Direct experience is an important influence in attitude change. In sorting the stories is important to find those positive experiences of climate change—like “we never used to be able to grow X on our farm and now we can”, rather to only report the negatives. Climate change is complex and when it comes to experiences climate change is local not global. For example on the north east coast of Sweden land rise in causing problems for communities. If only the sea would rise faster they would not have to dredge harbors, build new jetties and even rebuild the foundation of the Swedish Parliament building in Stockholm. It might improve this project to try to find real narratives, or if necessary construct the narratives of those who lived through the “little ice age” in Europe and though desertification in the middle east a couple of millennia ago. How have humans noticed, suffered and adapted to modifications in the climate? Emphasis on adaption. A promising project that already has a head start. I really like the idea of creating a place for diverse participants to share their emotional experiences related to climate change, and the goal to reach out to those normally marginalized in global climate politics--Alaska and the Maldives--is very laudable. Scientifically, it leverages the compelling nature of narrative. However, I'm a bit worried that those who need to change their attitudes will discount the negative effects experienced by distant, unfamiliar others (there are some scientific data on this). And there's also the "preaching to the choir" possibility. But this is clearly a well-thought out and potentially impactful project.

Jan Kunnas

Aug 25, 2014
02:34

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Hi, I like your proposal as well. I was wondering whether you also will be collecting stories regarding individuals actions to mitigate climate change? In that case there would be a clear connection to my Global plan, where I argue that actions by individual citizens can unleash the power of example, first engaging for example their neighbors, then their own community, their town, and finally their own country... Your proposal could be an important part in the crucial step from individual actions into inspirational actions. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300701/phaseId/1301103/planId/1308202

Climate Colab

Sep 3, 2014
12:23

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While this proposal has not been advanced as a Finalist, we appreciate your time and commitment to this initiative, and for participating in the Climate CoLab.

Kathryn Alexander

Jun 19, 2015
01:53

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Story telling makes ideas live and it deepens understanding of difficult and subtle issues at the same time. I'd like to add telling stories about what happens when people 'think and act like the planet'. My work has distilled the values nature uses so we can consciously apply her wisdom to our own behavior. The first value, alone provides rich opportunities for deep thinking. Please get in touch if this has interest. Kathryn Alexander ethicalimpact@gmail.com

Kate O.

Jul 1, 2015
11:32

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Using personal stories can be a powerful way to spur a movement and mobilize supporters. I love the component that would elevate voices of high school and college students in particular. That said, can you explain a bit more why this project is different from the other climate change story banks & projects already underway and what special value-add it would add? Why create another story project from scratch instead of collaborating with the national groups? The proposal asserts that it is distinctive but that distinction, and its value, may not be apparent to a typical person. Here are several examples: http://www.climatestories.us/ http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/aboutcc/problems/people_at_risk/personal_stories/witness_stories/ http://postcardsfromclimatechange.org/ One small idea to consider is to put all the storytellers' home states and cities on a map, thereby showing that climate threats are widespread. One larger idea would be to collaborate with StoryCorps, so that anyone with a smartphone could easily tell, record, and share their climate change story. See: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3043836/storycorps-wins-the-ted-prize-and-builds-an-app-that-lets-anyone-record-an-interview-on-thei StoryCorps Wins The TED Prize And Builds An App That Lets Anyone Record An Interview On Their Phone "For 11 years, StoryCorps has been recording the life stories of people from across the U.S, filing them away so that future generations can understand their great-great-grandparents and beyond. .... StoryCorps is now the largest collection of American voices in existence. The archive is so large that a researcher could look for interviews with specific groups say, transgender people of color in the Bay Area, and find a number of them."

Jason Davis

Jul 7, 2015
12:39

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Hello, Thanks for your comment! There is a map of climate stories on the website: http://www.climatestoriesproject.org/climate-stories-map.html and I plan to make it more dynamic and interactive as the project develops. Climate Stories Project is distinctive from other projects in its educational and artistic components. I have been working with high school and college students to develop cross-cultural and intergenerational interview skills and then have students carry out their own interviews with people in their communities and via Skype about personal and community climate change reactions. For example, students at Common Ground School in New Haven CT developed interviews questions and carried out interviews with local community members as well as students and an Iñupiat elder in Shishmaref, AK. In addition, I am composing and presenting music using the recorded climate stories with my multimedia group Earthsound. Examples can be found at climatestoriesproject.org and earthsoundmusic.net. I have contacted Storycorps about possible collaboration with Climate Stories Project and hope to work together with them in the near future. Best, Jason

Vidya Khapli

Jul 9, 2015
01:23

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Very good idea. Need to be implemented in the world. Actions are very important.