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Hanaa Rohman

Dec 3, 2014
02:53

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Hi Michael, Thank you for your proposal! You can certainly continue to work on your proposal without collaboration from other members. One thing I think should be clearer: How would your idea help reduce urban heat island effect? It may be helpful to look back at the UHI objectives: https://www.climatecolab.org/resources/-/wiki/Main/Urban+Heat+Island+Effect.

Michael Hayes

Dec 12, 2014
07:19

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Hi Hanaa, Thank you for the feedback. I'm looking for thermal map images of the local area to better visualize the exact thermal dynamics of the city. Would the judges have access to any space based images which have the resolution needed for detailed thermal understanding of the city? Best regards, Michael

Jennifer Lawrence

Dec 22, 2014
09:21

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Hi Michael: The Climate CoLab will be uploading our heat maps that look at our current heat in the summer, and approximate heat for 2030 and 2070. As far as thermal imaging, I will ask around to see what level of detail exists for our community. Jen

Jan Kunnas

Feb 6, 2015
11:45

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Have you calculated how much energy would be needed to cool the Pond at this scale?

Michael Hayes

Feb 6, 2015
04:17

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Hi Jan, good to see you engage on this issue. The numbers are highly flexible as this would be a year round operation (differing ambient temps.) and the actual size of the operation (impounded area) would be up to the City/Public Works. However, the lake bed methane energy production rate can be significant as can be the output of new sewage energy conversion method (oxyhydrogen reaction in algae http://jgp.rupress.org/content/26/2/241.full.pdf+html)being proposed. I expect a net excess energy output and the waste heat can be transmitted into space through the emissive energy harvester method (http://sjbyrnes.com/pub_PNAS_2014.pdf). Also, a robust energy storage network can be built around the use of organic flow batteries (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7482/full/nature12909.html). Beyond the use of Fresh Pond, the city has a network of recreational trails which can be used for subterranean infrastructure expansion using the OHRA/OFB and other advanced equipment needs. I enjoyed reading your proposal and find it to be elegant in it's simplicity. My biggest problem with this proposal is that I'm wanting to throw the kitchen sink at it as having a city like Cambridge open itself up to advanced means and methods is rare. Again, good to see your ideas and input on this issue. Micahel

Michael Hayes

Feb 6, 2015
05:17

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Sorry for the typos....I actually do know how to spell my own name!!!(LOL)

Kenneth D. Murray

Feb 7, 2015
08:54

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Proposed are safe, small-scale projects for city renewal, energy savings, carbon reduction, and learning opportunity for the public good.. Hi Michael, First, I have to say it's great to read about all of your on-going work and commendable efforts. I agree with everything. In fact, I would like to add some. For example on the subject of rock weathering from atmospheric CO2 dissolved to carbonic acid rain on exposed mafic or ultra-mafic mine tailings, research found the molecule locked into carbonate (CaCO3, MgCO3, etc) in Northern Canada.. ..anthropogenic CO2 derived carbonic acid falls onto Mg-, Ca-, Na-, K- containing SiO2 rocks forming carbonate http://www.czen.org/content/atmospheric-co2-sink-silicate-weathering-or-carbonate-weathering For purposes of Bio-Energy, I find its useful to accelerate weathering, capture biofuel combustion exhaust CO2 and then reuse it as aquaculture growth amendment**. I've had the process for some time now and still looking to apply it somewhere. It's entirely available for testing for anyone having necessary funds, contact me (kennethdmurray@gmail.com) -or- (Linked-In). **Cultured algae, other plants, some eukaryote require additional CO2 in photo zone or more than what's available. To remedy that, conventional wisdom bubbles-in cylinder CO2 gas - a processed liquid, very expensive. Murray

Michael Hayes

Feb 10, 2015
04:58

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Hello Murray, On the mineral weathering issue, I'm most familiar with the works of Prof. Olaf Schuiling (https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=prof%20olaf%20schuiling) and an AGU poster of his can be found at (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4dTSYGhZ8XnSHcwUXRzLWJEZzA/view?usp=sharing). He has been kind enough to give me guidance on many issues concerning the weathering of olivine and it looks like the reference you offered falls within his scope of work. Thank you for the paper and I'll keep it in my notes. On the comment of "accelerate weathering, capture biofuel combustion exhaust CO2 and then reuse it as aquaculture growth amendment", I'm not understanding the link between mineral weathering and biofuel. Obviously both belong in a well rounded protocol yet they are, in the order you've stated, of different regiments. The reuse of biofuel CO2 emissions is understandable with the only limitation being the size of the algal aquaculture operation being large enough to utilize the full CO2 flow. Also, the drop in pH when using a forced flow of CO2 would need to be mitigated which is something olivine is good at (as well as providing micro nutrients). So, in a round about way, yes, I do know about the importance of minerals and particularly in the BECCS cycle. Further, the CO2 emissions can also be converted for water pH adjustment using the method developed by Dr. Greg Rau et. al.; http://dge.stanford.edu/labs/caldeiralab/Caldeira_research/Rau_Knauss.html in which the end product would provide pH adjustment. I agree with your comment of "conventional wisdom bubbles-in cylinder CO2 gas - a processed liquid, very expensive." and I believe that the best path around that expense is through the direct use of CO2 emissions with continuous pH adjustment. All of the above has been in discussion within a number of different forums (for some time) and the overall methodology of looping the CO2 from biofuel emissions to micro-algae cultivation tanks and back is well understood. However, there is a need to take carbon out of the loop and that is achieved with the production of biochar. The pyrolysis of biomass is the most environmentally accepted way of taking carbon out of the loop as it not just provides a usable energy conversion (electrical production) but also provides biochar, which, as you know, when used in the soil offers multi-year CO2 sequestration means. As you may also know, biochar and the fungi/root interface can sequester around 25% of the biochar's weight per year for a number of years. This is referred to as the 'out-year' sequestration rate. In brief, the BECCS logic of more CO2 being sequestered than originally used in the loop provides us with Carbon Negative Energy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_carbon_dioxide_emission Murray, thank you for your comments and please let me know if I muddled the above. Best regards, Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 10, 2015
05:51

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As an addendum to the reference portion of the CHIP proposal; The use of a lake bed as a methane producing bio-digester is a novel idea. The rate of methane production is a relative issue and the below references can help the reader better understand the energy conversion dynamics. The qualitative evaluation of Biogas Samples Generated from Selected Organic Wastes: http://scholarsresearchlibrary.com/aasr-vol3-iss5/AASR-2011-3-5-549-555.pdf Physical Controls on Methane Ebullition from Reservoirs and Lakes: http://www.surfacegeology.earth.utah.edu/publications/Joyce_Jewell_EEG_2003.pdf Microbial methane cycling in the bed of a chalk river: oxidation has the potential to match methanogenesis enhanced by warming: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fwb.12480/pdf https://escholarship.org/uc/item/1c17w1th http://joyeresearchgroup.uga.edu/research/surficial-extreme-environments/temperate-salt-lakes/mono-lake-microbial-observatory 126 SCALES OF VARIABILITY IN SOURCES AND SINKS OF METHANE IN LAKES, RESERVOIRS AND RIVERS: http://www.sgmeet.com/aslo/granada2015/sessionschedule.asp?SessionID=126 Methane release rate and methanogenic bacterial populations in lake sediments: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/223931824_Methane_release_rate_and_methanogenic_bacterial_populations_in_lake_sediments Source!characterization!and!temporal variation!of!methane seepage!from thermokarst!lakes!on!the!Alaska!North!Slope! in response!to!Arctic!climate!change: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4dTSYGhZ8XnVjBqb2tGbEpHZjQ/view?usp=sharing

Kenneth D. Murray

Feb 10, 2015
09:45

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Michael, The mineral weathering issue: I wasn't being clear. More to the point, my intent is to use carbonate material made from bio-fuel combustion exhaust CO2. To use today's carbonate as a CO2 additive or amendment to the growth medium for enhanced growing of more feedstock, making more bio-fuel. Or food. The method avoids using processed cylinder CO2. Exhaust CO2 ends up being "caged" in today's carbonate material and introduced to soil or water as a solid (like chalk) or a slurry (water and bicarbonate). This way we can reuse the CO2 we create. And we don't use the processed CO2 dredged out of a layer of Cretaceous Period dolomite needing to be transported, crushed, heated, and pressurized to make CO2 cylinder gas because we can get it for free by exposing bio-fuel exhaust to any combination of four light metal salts. Oxide salts processed neat or with silicon sand. This of course, includes olivine or magnesium silicate and considers valued work by Professor Schuiling, but without a single mineral emphasis. Murray

Michael Hayes

Feb 13, 2015
05:47

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Murray, In what material way does your process differ from the method developed by Dr. Greg Rau et. al? http://dge.stanford.edu/labs/caldeiralab/Caldeira_research/Rau_Knauss.html

Kenneth D. Murray

Feb 14, 2015
09:05

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Michael ..an important win for advocates of soil carbon sequestration National Academy of Sciences Report on Carbon Removal: A Recap and Commentary comments 3 Posted February 13, 2015 Keywords: Carbon and De-carbonization, Energy Security, Tech, Communications and Messaging, Storage, Sustainability, Utilities, Climate, Environmental Policy, Cleantech, Renewables, Risk Management, Energy and Economy, Fuels, News, carbon capture and storage (ccs), carbon dioxide removal (cdr), climate change adaptation projects, energy report http://theenergycollective.com/all/15402 Murray

Kenneth D. Murray

Feb 14, 2015
09:36

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To answer your question. Professor Rau and associates accomplished excellent research and development resulting in patents and papers on the capacity of ordinary limestone + seawater to form bicarbonate in the presence of power plant flue gas carbon dioxide (CO2). This carbonation method (I totally support) is recommended for emissions from electrical power generating facilities burning fossil fuels. Unlike conventional amine technology, the prevailing carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) method (an expensive one that's complicated and potentially dangerous), Dr. Rau's proposal is economical, highly efficient, and safe. The resulting bicarbonate contains captured CO2 molecules for ocean deposition becoming useful for marine chemistry balance, and for sea life threatened by low pH due to human-caused, overly acidic conditions. My method for carbonation is the same but different. I use any kind of water and all macro-nutrients essential for the health of soil, water, plant, and animal life. The four elements of interest in are Mg, Ca, Na, and K, to be used in any combination as occurring in nature with silicon, or as contained in common rocks and minerals of igneous, sedimentary or volcanic origin, abundant discards on all continents without digging too deep. Carbonate or bicarbonate from natural oxide forms chalk-like residuals or slurry with mixtures exposed to carbonic acid or simply CO2 + H2O (the two species common to all combustion vapor. The captured carbon is useful. Recent evidence shows barren soils host masses of green life-forms after the addition of vehicle exhaust carbonate + biochar whereas controls do not (references are mine and available). The exhaust derived CO2 material is inert, easily and safely stored, or extracted for reuse by commercial technology. Attached below is a photo of application/device being tested. Pictured is a carbon dioxide (CO2) filter designed for a Mercedes Benz ML350. The device being tested is centered between two mufflers to capture vehicle carbon emissions by hybridized natural carbonation or carbonic acid weathering of minerals to bicarbonate residue. method in flow-through exhaust). The CO2 becomes caged in carbonate or bicarbonate then is removed by central canister for recycling. Murray Photo/Design_Feb_2015 https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=6bbee6fa2e&view=att&th=14b8ad27db886860&attid=0.1&disp=safe&realattid=f_i65qxs640&zw

Climate Colab

Feb 18, 2015
12:01

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Congratulations on making it to the Semi-Finals for the Urban Heat Island Effect contest. Please take into consideration the comments left by the judges and do please incorporate that feedback into your final proposal. We look forward to seeing your ideas finalized in the next iteration!

Jennifer Lawrence

Feb 18, 2015
10:12

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Dear Michael: The CoLab had a typo in their previous message to you. The contest closes on March 1st, NOT the 31st. Below are your proposal's comments from the judging team. Thank you for participating! Judge 1: The proposal is interesting, but the impact is unclear. It would help paint a better picture if the benefits are quantified, since the technology seems clear, but the desired effect isn't. Judge 2: This is an ambitious and potentially transformative proposal for a set of interconnected citywide initiatives that would address the UHI effect in local and more widespread ways. There are some really creative and interesting learning points that would both serve as important pilots for this and other localities and also inspirations for public engagement around the issue. Unfortunately, it's hard to understand exactly how these ideas would fit together from the proposal; I don't doubt that the authors have cohesive and coherent plan, but I am having trouble understanding the entire picture and specific details from what is written. I appreciate the large scale of the proposal and look forward to seeing more details if it reaches the next phase. From what I understand here, we're talking about a lot of work but as the proposers argue the need is an important one.

Michael Hayes

Feb 18, 2015
08:41

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Thank you for the feedback. I agree with both assessments and the comment of "This is an ambitious and potentially transformative proposal for a set of interconnected citywide initiatives that would address the UHI effect in local and more widespread ways. There are some really creative and interesting learning points that would both serve as important pilots for this and other localities and also inspirations for public engagement around the issue.". And, the observation of "we're talking about a lot of work but as the proposers argue the need is an important one.". Yes, there is a great deal of work in bringing about a fully fleshed out UHI protocol and such a protocol will cover many different sub-level projects in an attempt to realize the fullest synergistic benefits of the work and investments. In example, the CHIP starts out by proposing the creation of a thick ice sheet and then points out that such an ice sheet can generate significant income through a number of 'Off-Mission" efforts. However, it is those seemingly un-connected yet highly synergistic sub-level projects which can provide the greatest benefits to the greatest number. One way to show how the many synergistic components work together, to form a coherent whole, is a logic tree. This type of illustration may help show how one concept (and its quantity function) opens the door for other concepts...which in turn...allows for even more options. Inventing....anything...in the open and in front of a highly knowledgeable panel is tricky. The more feedback I can get; the more challenges I'm confronted with; the more specific the feedback and challenges are; the better end product I can deliver. Thank you for your feedback and further challenges. Best regards, Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 18, 2015
08:58

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I'll post the early stage development of the logic tree so as to provide the reader (Judges) with a view of how this is working out. Any suggestions/comments, (how deep do you need me to go on any one point?) on the logic tree will be welcomed.

Michael Hayes

Feb 20, 2015
05:35

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I'm having issues with the limited space available and thus I'm resorting to writing a Google Doc. to work-around the space limitations. Too much time has been spent on trying to fit everything into an arbitrary amount of space provided by the format. To quote Arnfield, A. J. et. al., (sec. 2.3): “....there are many UHIs, displaying different characteristics and controlled by different assemblages of energy exchange processes.”. And thus, to properly address (and explain) the multidimensional and multidisciplinary needs of this type of effort will require substantially more space than we are provided. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/joc.859/epdf It would be highly welcomed if the Judges can indicate if this type of 'off-form' work-around is permitted. Best regards, Michael

Hanaa Rohman

Feb 23, 2015
10:02

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Hi Michael, Thanks for your great work on this proposal! While sending supplemental material (images, references, in-depth explanations, etc.) at the end of the revision period is permitted, keep in mind that judges will have limited time to go through each proposal. Be sure to fit in all the essential information for your proposal into the CoLab template in a clear, concise manner. Best, Hanaa

Michael Hayes

Feb 24, 2015
09:08

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From https://lists.iisd.ca/read/?forum=climate-l Dear Colleagues, Please join us for the Climate Technology Centre and Network's next webinar: Cities and Climate Change 25 Feb 2015 - 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM (+01:00 Europe/Paris) Presented by CTCN Consortium Partner, the Asian Institute of Technology, this webinar will cover both climate change mitigation and adaptation, particularly focusing on the technological interventions (hardware, software and orgware) that cities can adopt as part of their efforts to combat, and build resilience to, climate change. Through interactive Q&A sessions, participants will have the opportunity to put forward their questions and comments to the panel of experts. Presenters include: Dr. Sangam Shrestha: expert in climate change assessments and adaptation Dr. Shobakar Dhakal: expert in energy policies, carbon market and finance, and low carbon society Dr. Vilas Nitivattananon: expert in infra-structural planning, climate and costal cities Prof. Kim Oanh: expert in air pollution, environmental monitoring and modelling To read more about this webinar or to register, please visit http://ctc-n.org/content/cities-and-climate-change All the best, Karina Larsen Karina Larsen / Knowledge & Communications Manager Climate Technology Centre & Network (CTCN) k.larsen@unido.org UN City, Marmorvej 51, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark http://www.ctc-n.org/ www.unido.org

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
03:53

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Quinton, On the AC waste heat issue, please read below; http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/2010JAMC2538.1 A Study of the Urban Boundary Layer Using Different Urban Parameterizations and High-Resolution Urban Canopy Parameters with WRF FRANCISCO SALAMANCA AND ALBERTO MARTILLI Research Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT), Madrid, Spain Abstract: "During the night, this anthropogenic heat was responsible for an increase in the air temperature of up to 2C in the densest urban areas,". page 1125 "In agreement with other studies (Ohashi et al. 2007), the waste heat increased the air temperature by 0.58–2C depending on the location inside the city and the day considered (meteorological conditions)". If we also take a look at the energy cost of this phenomena, factored out over the population, the cost of alternative cooling means and methods starts to come into focus as a possible utility level option. And, providing state-of-the-art alternative cooling means for buildings, at both the internal and external spatial dimensions, may be worth consideration by the City government. The use of thermal inertia, either through geo/aquathermal and or cold water misting (both options also found in the CHIP proposal), may possibly be the most direct path to mitigating the worst of the peak UHI effects. However, we can go even further. We also have a possible additional tool in mitigating this waste heat issue. In that, if a simple Stirling engine is mated to existing medium to large AC units, using the waste heat and cooled water from geo/aquathermal/cold water misting etc., the Stirling engine can energize a Emissive Energy Harvester (EEH) and transmit a majority of the waste energy into space. Simply "beam it up, Scotty"!! http://sjbyrnes.com/pub_PNAS_2014.pdf Or, the Sterling's energy output can be used to energize secondary space coolers or the converted energy can simply be stored in onsite Organic Flow Battery (OFB) systems for later use. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7482/full/nature12909.html I hope the above shows that we currently have a wide range of truly advanced options to use and that they offer us a high degree of flexibility in mitigating the UHI. Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
03:30

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Quinton, a few last thoughts on the regional geothermal concept et. al., 1) the sewage system is a good source of geothermal energy. Geothermal Heat Pump System Taps Sewage Instead of Bedrock http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/geothermal-system-taps-sewage-instead-bedrock.html In building a district geothermal system, a sewage heat pump system upgrade may be worth the cost. The CHIP proposal focused specifically upon the UHI set of problems (summer issues) yet year round thermal demands can be addressed through reasonable modification of the water system which can be done without the cost of re-engineering/re-building the roads. 2)On the other hand, if the road system can be rethought->rebuilt, a number of urban issues can be addressed at one time. The Governor's Development Cabinet would be my first target for gaining support for a district wide rethink of energy/water/sewage/transport etc. Clearly, the built-up urban areas are struggling with what is, in essence, late 19th/early 20th century technology in a complex 21st century demand matrix. Starting with a blank sheet and designing a new 'multiplexed utility/transport' grid system, with today's leading edge sustainability knowledge and advanced equipment, is, in the long run, probably the most economically and environmentally sound solution to many of the infrastructure problems that we face. Such an approach would truly be revolutionary....for the US. Cambridge may be the community which sparks such a US revolution in urban sustainability. Let's hope so. Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
03:10

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Hello Quinton, Geothermal and Aquathermal are both available through the water system...if...the lake is aggressively cooled. If cold water is delivered through the water pipes, the property owner can use the thermal inertia in a number of useful ways. If we can build up thermal inertia during the winter or through bio-energy inputs during the summer, the lake can become available as a city wide sink (one aspect of the CHIP proposal). The river has great potential yet the regulatory burden when working with waterways is substantial. However, I would like to see the City use that important asset as, once it is in play, we may be able to expand the mission to include water filtration to support littoral health. You mentioned using the harbor as a heat sink (which is supportable). However, you may also want to take a look at the airport. The large open areas that the airport offers can be useful both as a heat sink and as an underground bio-fuel production tank farm. Obviously, the airport will want access to the fuel and thus a straight barter, land for bio-fuel, may be realistic. Best regards, Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
03:47

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Hi Murray, Your proposal is a good, well rounded, collection of ideas and I would like to offer a few comments as a light weight form of collaboration. Clearly, your past work on these issues has gained you the respect of the Mayor and many local environmental actors and I, being an outsider, simply can not compete with both your local knowledge and acceptance. As I'm sure everyone at the community action level understands, getting the City a win on the Georgetown Energy Challenge should be a strong priority as the prize money would obviously open many technological paths. The proposals within this MIT Climate Colab Challenge should be weighed heavily on the specific subject of the need "...to reduce America’s energy consumption" value so as to potentially help the City win. My comments/suggestions on your proposal are: 1) It's great to see the inclusion of biochar in your proposal. The fastest way we have to a negative carbon emissions scenario is through the use of biochar and liquid biofuels. This is the basic logic behind the strong IPCC (WG 3) support for 'Bio-Energy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration' (BECCS). The upstream supply of biomass is the primary limiting factor for BECCS and cities have huge biomass potential within their sewage systems through using the nutrients within the sludge to cultivate micro-algae. This cycling of sewage nutrients into both liquid fuel and biochar can be a true win-win scenario for cities as the fuel can be used to run city vehicles/power plants with excess fuel being sold for the cash revenues. The biochar can be used in the city through pasture cropping methods and the excess biochar being sold off to the agro community for additional profits. These important benefits are compounded further if one considers that such use of the sewage waste stream would significantly reduce the cost of treatment/discharge...and...the limiting of the environmental damage that comes with discharging, even treated waste, in the water ways. However, large scale operation of photosynthetic algae tanks are currently not a realistic urban option for a number of obvious reasons. The limitations of providing artificial lighting and or large surface area cultivation tanks for natural lighting being the prime limiting factors. There is simply no room for such operations and, understandably, folks simply will not want the smell. Thus, we need a way around photosynthesis. The oxyhydrogen reaction in microalgae offers such an option which allows the cultivation of algae within dark reactors which are as simple as water pipelines and other simple vessels. In looking over the documents provided for this challenge, there appears to be a significant amount of new waterlines being planed for just south of Fresh Pond and that work could easily incorporate a dark cultivation pipeline network placed next to the standard water pipes. Also, this combined approach to sewage management/bio-fuel production/carbon negative enhancement (i.e. biochar) can be the foundation for a....safe...low pressure city wide hydrogen fuel distribution network as dark cultivation of algae uses hydrogen and the dark cultivation network could be tapped into for this hydrogen for home/city/industry energy needs. In brief, there are no complicated details concerning the biochar/bio-fuel based negative carbon emission scenario and the oxyhydrogen reaction in algae (the complex side) is not that difficult to understand and is safe use. http://jgp.rupress.org/content/26/2/241.full.pdf+html Most importantly, using sewage for biofuel/biochar production (the carbon negative/BECCS scenario) can be viewed as both a reduction in overall energy use and a system which (per Georgetown) "Highlight best practices for communities working with utilities, businesses, and their local governments to create and implement inventive plans for sustained energy efficiency". 2) Your support for green roofs/walls etc. is highly supportable and well stated. I see the Copenhagen Green Roof protocol as a much needed national/global standard. http://inhabitat.com/copenhagen-adopts-a-mandatory-green-roof-policy/ 2) The thermal glass shielding of walkways/streets is an idea which will be useful for many communities...which can afford them. These glass canopies would also be a prime location for cold water misting units for those days which pose critical health concern conditions, as well as, possible utility runs. As the canopies will be a large capital expense, designing in as many ancillary functions as possible is obviously important. Enclosing multi-modal walkways and roadways, with a combination of technologies including utility runs, can be a significant economic savings for the community, as well as, environmentally sound. Such a combination would represent a 'Multiplexed' roadway as opposed to a multi-modal roadway. The roadway designers and city utilities designers need to start talking and listening to each other on the potential synergies available in designing for multiplexed systems. Clearly, room is under utilized in the roadway systems. If we simply had 3 runs of 5' dia. dual walled HDPE culvert pipelines running along under or above each roadway we would have: a) ample room for biomass/bio-fuel production which would provide- b) the fuel we need for transport and industry in general- c) a means to capture the CO2 emissions pumped down from the enclosed roadway ventilation system- d) a means to process our sewage and thus avoid discharging into the environment e) cargo hyperloops (pneumatic transport tubes) to move bulk commodities f) easy repair/upgrade of all systems g) the under roadway variant offers substantial geothermal energy potential which, combined with biomass production, makes such multiplexed systems potentially net energy producers while operating at a net negative carbon emissions level (biochar being an export commodity by-product of the biomass production). The above list of benefits is not exhaustive. Glassed in, green roofed/walled multiplexed walkways/roadways with biomass production means would seem to offer savings for all concerned budgets. A synergistic analysis of the combined city budget for roadways, water/sewage lines and bio-energy/energy savings needs, using not multi-modal but...multiplexed....walkways/streets could be an interesting exercise. 3) Few people know about Heron's pump and I was impressed that you brought it to the table. I've often wondered what benefits we would have if the Heron Pump were to be mated to the Water Ram. There is nothing restricting the two working together to provide a highly reliable, although low efficient, combined energy conversion/storage system. https://www.google.com/search?q=water+ram&es_sm=93&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=Du7LVL6BJpHYoAShq4KwAw&ved=0CFsQsAQ&biw=1366&bih=667 The ability of the Water Ram to produce significant pressure can be used, in a stepped fashion, to pump water up to any roof. However, the ram needs an ability to sluff off a good deal of the intake water and thus the reservoir and return pumping provided by the Heron might be usefully linked. In brief, Herons typically lack high pressure output where as Rams, which has high pressure output, need a return pump/reservoir. This combination may or may not be useful but it is fun to mentally dink around with. 4) Your inclusion of water filtration is welcomed and the type of filtration, such as aquaponics, can feed into the need for biomass production. One idea concerning combining urban water filtration/aquaponics is to incorporate the aquaponics into covered road/walk ways and or green roof greenhouses, which many have recommended, yet focus upon non-eatable plants with extremely high CO2 uptake rates. Giant Bamboo has an almost scary growth rate (CO2 uptake) and offers a number of synergistic down stream benefits. http://www.lewisbamboo.com/growth-chart.html I would like to add to this water related subject the need for the cultivation of beneficial aquatic animals such as rotifers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotifer) and copepods (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copepod) as many urban lakes/ponds have become so contaminated with heavy metals that these animals, which are vital to natural water filtration and biotic health, have been stressed to the point of reproductive failure. The cultivation of both species can be incorporated into aquaponics operations and the animals transferred to the open water sites until the lake/pond water quality improves enough for natural regeneration. 5) The call for thermophotonics is much in line with the call for the use of the emissive energy harvesting (EEH) technology. http://www.pnas.org/content/111/11/3927.short I've always been amazed at the call for more and more energy when we are awash in energy and our growing problem is getting rid of it! The use of thermophotonics/EEH like energy management systems need to be central in all urban planning efforts. Large scale energy storage is also an important energy related need and the use of organic flow batteries is safe to use on a city wide scale and easy to design into many of the structural elements under review. The turnip enzymes needed for such batteries can be produced within the local gardens. This would be a great K-12 project to get the kids interested in both biology and energy management. Thus, this aspect keys into the third Georgetown objective. 6) Terra Preta will be one of the main downstream outputs of a sewage based biomass/biofuel/biochar production system. Also, the importance of including olivine dust into the biochar/organic fertilizer has become evident as the olivine feeds the soil mycorrhiza which, in turn, feeds the plants the minerals provided by the olivine. Electron microscopic studies found this important link this last year (or two). When we get into the details of this overall area of interest, that of olivine/biochar/organic fertilizers, I like to point out a new technology which cities can use as both a means for dispersing of these biologically important commodities but also kill off weeds along roadways and other landscape sites instead of using chemical agents. The USDA is investing in the development of sandblasting gear which uses organic fertilizer as the weed whacking abrasive. I've emailed the developers and asked that olivine and biochar be included in the abrasive fertilizer. If we can find a way to collect the proper mycorrhiza spores and throw them into the abrasive/fertilizer sandblasting mix, terra preta would be as common as...dirt! http://www.northcentralsare.org/Newsroom/Regional-News-and-Press-Releases/Researcher-Uses-Sandblasting-for-Weed-Control 7) The only word of caution I would like to offer is related to the wide spread use of lime. The caustic nature of quick lime may represent an issue for the water filtration/biotic city systems. In all, your work is excellent and I would like to hear more of your thoughts on the type of organization you would recommend be created to help manage this effort. I hope that my effort at this collaborative exchange has been of some use to you and I do truly hope we can continue this exchange in the future. Best regards,

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
05:53

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Dear Biomimicry, It may be worth investigating how to waterproof bacterial fabric for this application. You may have run across this: http://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_lee_grow_your_own_clothes?language=en Designer Suzanne Lee shares her experiments in growing a kombucha-based material that can be used like fabric or vegetable leather to make clothing. I've been looking into different non-GMO options for waterproofing this type of fabric as I could use vast amounts of fabric in off-shore applications. If your group has any interest in this path, please let me know. Michael

Michael Hayes

Feb 28, 2015
05:11

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Also, 1) I see your canopy designs as great platforms for fire hydrant based cold water misting operations. Installing small diameter cold water lines and misting nozzles, much like is used in greenhouses, would provide the canopies with a wide area cooling effect. 2) If such a cold water misting network is incorporated into the canopy fabric, rapid changes in water pressure may cause the canopy to move in a predicable way. Thus, this method may lead to a means for moving large volumes of air mass within areas like urban canyons. I'm proposing the creation of a large ice sheet on Fresh Pond to create a cooling advective current. I would like to increase the air mass flow rate over the ice and using the misting canopy and or mechanized velarium concepts is high on the list of options. Best wishes, Michael

Laur Hesse Fisher

Mar 4, 2015
09:15

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Dear proposal authors: The Finalist selection phase has been extended so Judges could finalize their comments. The Fellow team will be in touch with more details as they arise. Thank you for your patience and understanding. ~~ Laur Climate CoLab Project Manager

Climate Colab

Mar 6, 2015
12:51

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Dear CHIP: Thank you again for submitting a proposal to the UHI contest. The cooling of fresh pond is an innovative and creative idea. While we believe you have a novel proposal, we have decided not to send it on to the finals. Thank you again for participating! Sincerely, Jen

Michael Hayes

Apr 17, 2015
01:15

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I have found that my proposal has been edited without my knowledge. Please see https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301101/phaseId/1301702/planId/1312501

Michael Hayes

Apr 17, 2015
04:00

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Yet, the work was changed to: https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301101/planId/1312501

Jennifer Lawrence

Apr 27, 2015
09:32

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Hi Michael: I have just now seen that your proposal was changed - I do not have authority/permissions to resolve anything on the platform, but please do contact the Climate CoLab staff directly. Sincerely, Jen City of Cambridge

Michael Hayes

May 19, 2015
03:18

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This proposal was edited without permission and shifted to this category. The who, why and how has been reviewed by me and others and the CoLab team has apologized for the "computer glitch". The CHIP proposal is now withdrawn by me from the 'Adaptation' challenge.
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