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Anna Förster

Jul 16, 2014
03:11

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The linked website is empty? The ice aid really worth expanding and working out, but you do not have a lot of time. You need to explain well and in detail at least one of the conversion techniques and you need also kind of a business plan for such a plant - hope much will it cost to build one on a cement site, for example, how much will it cost to run it, what it will produce and how you can sell it, etc.

Mark Everson

Jul 16, 2014
12:37

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Hallo Anna Thanks for the encouragement and sorry about the site - the site provider flipped out but I'm assured it will be back on line tomorrow. That does include some supporting numbers, so is linking to that sufficient? I'm not in a good position to produce a business plan... my chosen career path means I now have no contacts able to advise on financials for something like this. My key argument would be that CCS is being implemented at high cost and pays back nothing - so a plant that offers similar benefits and would probably be at similar cost, but pays back large volumes of food or biofuel and produces life-giving O2 throughout its life must be better. My main site provides more info so I'll sort the link out tomorrow. Thanks again for the input, I really do appreciate it! :)

Mark Everson

Jul 24, 2014
04:38

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UPDATE - work at Purdue Uni http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723152023.htm may be suggesting spinach would be a good choice of plant. I'll try and get some mass balance info, if I can I'll add to this.

Mark Everson

Jul 29, 2014
10:53

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STOP PRESS! http://t.co/gP3CgKTxtL, airborne water vapour magnifies global warming effects. And much water vapour comes from burning carbon fuels; the equation for wood combustion (all carbon fuels are broadly similar) is C6H12O6 + 6 O2 = 6 CO2 + 6 H2O So, it occurs that HCCAS recovers heat from flue streams. Flue streams are water-vapour rich, so when we recover the heat from the flue gas we ALSO condense out LOTS of water. Yes, it'll be acidic with CO2 and contaminated with combustion by-products like sulphur, but it's there and - I think - fairly easily treatable and cleanable. Most importantly, it hasn't gone into the atmosphere. So we're adding *water vapour scavenging* to HCCAS's other virtues of - CO2 reduction - O2 production - and food/biomass generation. Not bad.

Climate Colab

Aug 6, 2014
12:25

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We have seen much work on growing algae with CO2 waste streams already -- what makes this approach different or novel? We would have also needed to see the key challenges more thoroughly addressed.

Climate Rescue

Aug 6, 2014
02:41

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The key innovation here is as stated in the proposal; to use plants for CCS not just algae. I hope the judges took time to read this.