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Climate Rescue

Nov 26, 2013
07:47

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Wondering about how this proposal maps onto the problem. Defence against invasion is a small subset of the reasons for military spending (biggest spenders are direct or proxy invaders not invadees?). Nonviolence alliances might attract only a subset of military spenders (the small ones - while overall weapons spending could go on upwards?). Conflict is a subset of the problem dynamic involving climate (all issues are worsened so should all be considered?)

Pia Jensen

Dec 3, 2013
01:12

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Great observations & thoughts... I will confer with Paul to see how we may address these points. I appreciate your visualization of this as a "map" - think that may help in seeing the intersecting and non-aligned issues... it may be, that we have enough people and governments concerned over climate that we can bring them in ... and curb or even end violent conflict ... ? I think a goal of "climate change survival" may be the glue that binds us all...

Climate Rescue

Dec 4, 2013
05:40

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Thanks Pia, aligning issues can do useful things: • end silo solutions + start bigger coalitions • scale up ambition, eg reversing climate chaos AND arms race AND... • reveal previously missed policy options to do this fast, eg http://blindspot.org.uk/seven-policy-switches/

Pia Jensen

Dec 4, 2013
04:07

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* great* James .... indeed, we have many silo solutions embedded (e.g. http://www.securitymanagement.com/article/dont-silo-crisis-solutions-006034) requiring fresh look and 'overlapping' for more comprehensive solution generation - long time practice of compartmentalizing issues, jobs, concepts has created what you term "blind spots - this can be overcome with holistic planning. Coalitions of diverse and similar goals can fit under one umbrella... if we come to terms with what really matters - survival... .... 'scaling up ambition' - interesting way of putting it, channels what may be disorganized, fear based, anxiety ridden energy into coordinated team based response for higher standards in long term goals... .... previously missed policy options - Yes! During the conference discovered that the UN has tons of information that is simply collecting dust - University students could be called upon (since it is primarily their and their children's future we are working for) to sift through already collected information (data, findings, policy, etc.) to help build the 'map' ....

Paul Emile Anders

Dec 6, 2013
08:56

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Thanks "cimaterescue" and Pia. A big-picture approach is interesting. I just read the Wikipedia article on the Democratic World Federalists, the first paragraph says, "Democratic World Federalists, a civil society organization based in San Francisco with supporters worldwide, advocates a democratic federal system of world government in order to end war and crimes against humanity and to promote “a just world community and the preservation of a livable and healthful global environment” through the development of enforceable world law. It is affiliated with the Coalition for Democratic World Government, the Community of World Citizens, and the World Federalist Movement." One aim of D.W.F. seems to be avoiding militarism, "Rather than using force to solve international conflicts, political and judicial structures and procedures would be used. Although democratically-elected national governments would still be in charge of domestic affairs at the country level, world courts with enforceable judgments would be able to try perpetrators of international and world-level crimes." Gene Sharp's 198 tactics for nonviolent action can come into play also. Given the urgency of climate disruption, I think we need to move very quickly. And I think of Feisty Doves as a rapid effort, initially involving the nations for whom the approach is most attractive, the low-hanging fruit.

Doron Bracha

Apr 30, 2014
01:13

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Great idea, even if world politics are complicated, and implementing it would face big challenges. Forming alliances has many advantages, and may promote a more efficient use of resources, and a reduction in military activities, which are very bad for the environment. If armed conflicts arise due to competition on water, arable land, food etc, then military defense is important but not enough. Solutions need to be provided, such as sea water desalination systems, renewable energy, advanced agriculture that uses less water and yields more food etc. Imagine if mankind could put less energy, time, money and efforts into weapons and warfare, and more into civil infrastructure, medical research and a more sustainable lifestyle... This alliance initiative seems to be a step in the right direction. Cheers !..

Paulo Borges De Brito

Jun 20, 2014
01:17

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Wondering what actions do you propose for the main goal of this project. Paulo

Hemant Wagh

Sep 30, 2014
10:14

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Hello, Nice theme you have presented, could you consider supplementing it with the one that shares feelings with yours! Link to that is below. kindly go through it and oblige.. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401 Thanks..

Pete Epanchin

Apr 23, 2015
11:49

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Indeed, alliances can be powerful and there is a rich history of success that have come through non-violent action. However, I didn't follow what the demands of the "Feisty Doves" would be or who (which countries) they would be making these demands to. What countries would you approach with a request to join? How realistic is it for a country to join? I would think it more feasible to start at subnational levels. For example, the 68 Mississippi River Mayors who have formed a coalition to go to the UNFCCC's COP21 in Paris: http://www.nemw.org/images/issues/MRCTI/MRCTI_2015_Capitol_Meeting_Press_Release.pdf Keep working on this!
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