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Only types of energy that can be produced in the future and requirements that will be necessary

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John Rosebush

Jan 25, 2013
03:33

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We know electricity, compressed air or hydrogen will be the only power sources available to us in the future (50 to 100 years from now) The only exception will be a small amount of biofuels we probably will produce for special situations. Alternative energy (electricity) will be used to create the hydrogen or compressed air. One of the biggest challenges we will face is the how we convert electricity to hydrogen and hydrogen back to electricity. This will allow us to essentially transport electricity to places remotely where electricity cannot be created. This will require the most safest and most efficient way to make the conversions and safely store it. This will be one of the biggest challenges we will face. Another huge challenge is powering our aircraft with hydrogen or compressed air in the future. As far as being able to create electricity in mass, I have created an invention that can generate 150 to 200 TW of continous clean Eco friendly power distributed around the world. I will soon unveil this invention to the world. It will require our planet to come together to cooperate and assist one another instead of combative approaches we see today. I haven't decided how I plan to unveil the invention yet. Things are still unfolding as I write this note to you. I respect MIT and all the contributions you have delivered to the world over the years. Your one of the most respected research facilities in the world. I also believe in the way you address issues with your team collaborations.

James Greyson

Jan 25, 2013
05:59

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Hi John, thanks for coming over from twitter @johnrosebush, and sharing thoughts on future energy carriers and energy sources. You'll certainly have people's attention if you can make a hundredth of the world's electricity supply! Your ideas could be a very interesting proposal in the CoLab's 'Decarbonizing energy supply' contest. After your patents are arranged I hope it will be possible to share more here. James

John Rosebush

Jan 26, 2013
12:51

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You and your friends need to watch the video on youtube I created about a month ago. It should give you a better understanding of the inventions capabilities. I think you will gain alot of knowledge and understanding of the issues facing the planet. Another important video you should watch is Earth 2100 produced by ABC. I believe the invention can power the entire planet 10 to 15 times over. The largest implementation site we looked at would have the ability to produce 750,000 megawatts of electricity. Thats about 65 to 70% of the power generated in the United States or China. There are probably 10,000 sites in each country or continent (U.S., China, India, South America, Africa or Europe) where this invention could be implemented. I believe you should spend your time on not creating energy but how to replace carbon fuels with electricity more efficiently in all the products we use today. We all know that electricity will be the basis for all power in the future. I am not trying to tell your organization what to do, just giving you my opinion. Powering our planet - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF_Fty3G8cg Earth 2100 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUWyDWEXH8U

Tom Mallard

Jan 29, 2013
02:51

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We don't need fossil fuels for electricity if other energy needs are not done by converting electricity to them, i.e. heating water. Here's a strategy to have low carbon-footprint liquid fuels for transportation and heating from a renewable feedstock. Studied wastewater treatment since college and visited the full-recycle plant at North Lake Tahoe a couple of times ... wastewater effluent is algae food but making biodiesel isn't especially low carbon-footprint because the water isn't recycled. If you don't recycle the water you'll have to truck the slurry/slime/sludge to some fields for dispersal regardless of method used at the treatment plant or biodiesel plant, this a heavy blow to carbon-footprint because of the weight, overhead is high on scheduling, many times contains pathogens and so on. The other issue is harvesting, centrifuges are used at about 100% of biodiesel plants using algae, this requires a lot of electrical power so the low carbon-footprint is gone but still way better than a fossil fuel so this is relative but significant for costs not just carbon. When you recycle the water what's left are de-watered, pressed algae cakes that are lightweight, all the pathogens are consumed by bacteria then algae in the end, and importantly it's a good fertilizer & soil enhancer & can be stored dry & applied on-demand making it a far better agricultural product over slurries & sludges. Finally my favorite algae Spirogyra jumped wheat yields 25% tests ongoing but there ya' go. So we don't need gasoline or fossil-diesel, using algae to purify a city's wastewater can return 7L/2gal per person per day on the system, the USA burns 6L/1.6gal per day per person in all types of transportation fuels. This can be miniaturized to family-farm-ranch scale so that anyone can make the fuel they need by living in a home. Then we need a low cabon-footprint fuel that runs in any IC-engine on the planet or it won't scale, from leaf-blowers to aircraft, and biodiesel can be tweaked to run in the gamut of engines with perhaps 2-grades at the pump for gasket & seal types in engines. Biodiesel from algae consumes CO2 and emits O2, so when scaled this technique will seriously drop global CO2 values from world transportation running on wastewater locally so costs are low on distribution, distances trivial from biodiesel producer to pump, the water is recycled, the pressed cakes are a good agricultural product and this in high-volume so a large resource for local food production. Then, consider farming and the opportunities for agriculture to use its sewage to produce biodiesel to run the farm equipment, this also producing the fertilizer for the crops. This becomes a positive system for farmers to upgrade their soils with the waste being produced. So, when considering the future producing biodiesel this way is not trivial in volume, Phoenix, AZ, produces 10-millon gal/day of secondary effluent, that's some 41.5-million pounds of fertilizer to grow algae with worth about $8.3-million a day at $400/ton if one had to buy it and can produce about 3-million gallons a day of biodiesel for the one city, nearby Super Bowl Glendale produces a like amount. Fortunately this is getting closer to reality, 1/3 of biodiesel producers use wastewater as a feedstock but don't recycle the water, so that is the missing type of bioreactor.

John Rosebush

Jan 31, 2013
12:31

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Tom, we are going to need liquid fuels for special situations and I also agree with everything you said. I also think we should use Geothermal, wind, solar, wave technology where it makes since. The only thing I was trying to get across is carbon fuels will disappear and I believe the invention I created will be the basis for energy generation in the future.
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