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Anastasia Kouki

Sep 9, 2017
03:21

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I have to admit that this proposal seems very well structured, but is coming from and already existed initiative, that I do not see how well connected is with the thematic, on the contrary is kind theoretical and lack lickages with an effective rea;ity resulting outcome. It has content, but not so much context. Plus, I do not see any impact assessment analysis based on a specific timeline. 


Andrew Gaines

Sep 9, 2017
06:22

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Hi Anastacia,

Thanks for your consideration.

The premise behind this proposal is that unless we inspire mainstream commitment to changing all the factors that make global warming worse – and soon! – we won’t succeed.

Do you think this premise is correct?


Roger Eaton

Sep 17, 2017
02:33

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I think you are on the right track, Andrew. Your premise is very general, and the fact is that we need to be proceeding on multiple paths, but global mainstream commitment across all nations, cultures and religions is a must. How do we get there? May I post the link to your climatecolab proposal in the Voices of Humanity site as a contribution there from you? 


Jeff White

Sep 19, 2017
10:26

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Hi Andrew, This is an exciting, straightforward, bold proposal which has the potential to challenge the current trajectory of 'growth' threatening the biosphere of spaceship Earth and all its inhabitants. It is imperative to nurture a new story  that transcends empire building and shifts to a harmonious, regenerative global culture.

There are so many progressive organizations large and small working on campaigns, issues and ideas that are connected and interdependent. In his awesome book Blessed Unrest, Paul Hawkins describes this unprecedented phenomenon as "the largest social movement in history which is restoring grace, justice and beauty to the world." With some notable exceptions, what's largely missing are strategies and catalysts that connect the efforts of these organizations to unite them in averting runaway climate change or the more accurate 'global climate chaos" and transforming our insane culture.

Great cartoon about the 'climate summit'. I use that image whenever I get into a discussion about one's 'belief' in climate science. Cartoons and humour are a great way to cut to the chase in a way that usually avoids righteousness and lectures. 

We absolutely must challenge and change all the systems but as they are all intricately connected it is a matter of finding the greatest points of leverage to have the deepest and most rapid impact. As a US civil rights activist in the 1960's segregrated U.S. South  once remarked, "The impossible may take a little while, but do you really have something more important to do?"

I look forward to reading more of the links and getting involved.  

Jeff White  


Julie Adam

Sep 20, 2017
03:14

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I strongly support  this truly original proposal, for it looks at every aspect of our global predicament, especially referencing the issues where the privileged First World countries have so much to consider, assimilate, re-think and ultimately act upon, locally and globally.

It does not flinch from asking the Big Question of "How to Win" asap and provides tools for changing the mindset of the 'general population', thus accelerating human awareness and consciousness - so that we can turn things around throughout the world.

 

Julie Adam


Dave Sag

Sep 20, 2017
04:04

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I like the ambition, and yet the simplicity of this proposal.  No committees to join, no meetings to be had, but a lot of resources to support the many conversations that need to happen to change people's mind-sets.  I like that this proposal does not shy away from the scale of transformation needed to actually make a difference.


Sailesh Rao

Sep 20, 2017
06:10

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I wholeheartedly endorse this breathtakingly simple proposal and its Gandhian approach. If environmental and faith-based organizations adopt this common goal of transitioning to a life-affirming global culture - and align their actions with this goal - then there would be no stopping the momentum that would build up towards the Great Transition.


Haydn Washington

Sep 20, 2017
07:20

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I think Andrew's proposal is a useful part of what Thomas Berry called 'The Great Work'. There are indeed so many groups seeking change but many of them reinvent the wheel as they do not know what wheels others found work.


Josie Mclean

Sep 21, 2017
02:57

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I love the simplicity of this proposal that enables people rather than directing them. We do not what specific answers will emerge but we can be sure that emergence is what is required. Well done Andrew!


James (gien) Wong

Sep 21, 2017
03:21

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I support Andrew's Endeavor. I like it's de-centralized approach. Really what Andrew is offering is a toolset that anybody who is so inclined can use to promote change at the grassroots level. The informal conversations around the kitchen table are needed to bring the mainstream into the transition. There's a lot of people out there in the long tail who have a desire to help but don't have the extensive scientific or academic background to do something on their own, but these tools empower them to start getting out there and be part of the change in a meaningful way. A lot of times, you just have to get started, and the process of doing generates all kinds of opportunities and networks that happen ONLY AS A RESULT of doing something.


Rob Harding

Oct 12, 2017
11:10

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I support your proposal, Andrew, and we are aligned. I'd like to second Josie's comment regarding "the simplicity of this proposal that enables people rather than directing them." This is excellent and essential.

And as James stated, "bring[ing] the mainstream into the transition" is also essential.

We must try to succeed, so let us try.


Julian Cribb

Oct 20, 2017
03:14

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If humanity is to save itself, it needs to be fully engaged in the task. Andrew Gaines understands this perfectly. Communication, rather than science alone, is the key. Science can tell us what the task is - but only communication can generate the will and motivation to undertake it.

We have to engage every single person in the task of regenerating our world, making it safe and secure for the future and the generations to come. This is not something you can do with metrics and formulae. You have to speak to the heart and soul of humanity as well as the brain. And not just western humanity, polluted as it is with the irrational dogma of perpetual growth.

We need more thinking like this if we are to avoid the fate we have currently ordained for ourselves.


Andrew Gaines

Oct 20, 2017
07:19

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Several of the supporters of this proposal are authorities in their own right. Haydn Washington is an environmental academic. He is the author of Climate Change Denial and Demystifying Sustainability. Anna Schlunke is the Sydney convenor of the Center for the Advancement of the Steady-State Economy (CASSE).

Science writer Julian Cribb’s recent book Surviving the 21st Century outlines eight mega-threats in addition to climate change that threaten civilization, and possibly human survival as a species.

Assuming that he gets his comment in by the deadline, Paul Ehrlich is a world-renowned expert not only on population and biodiversity loss, but on the systemic changes necessary to reverse global warming the extent still possible.


Ralf Lippold

Nov 2, 2017
07:30

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Hi Andrew, 

reading through your proposal, and the comments here and the judges' statement reminds me of a challenge visionary ideas/projects face once they are in a "seeding phase" where nothing much (rather than under bottom line, where connections and networks are weaved together, and ideas crystalized) is really happening. 

Especially in a contest like this one that is focusing on "shifting attitudes and behavior" it can't be expected to see a quick over-night happening solution.

Two things that make me think in general terms:

  • How do we nurture ideas that are still in their seed phase sensing their future potential and appreciate such as taking such into account as potential semi-finalists?
  • How do we integrate already running and existing projects that may benefit from the multi-cultural background of the participants and projects within the various contests and the Climate CoLab community itself?

One advice (which I got personally) is to move the proposal into a workspace (I also have to figure out how to do that) and work along with the proposal and feedback by others. 

All the best for your journey, 

A passionate catalyst and member of the community 

Ralf 

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