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Michal Monit

Sep 8, 2017
02:22

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Hi Darren, 

An interesting idea!
In the beginning I misunderstood the illustrations a bit since it seemed that the effective area of the lenses was small (but then realized it was the wire structure since the lens would be transparent). Which brings me to a question - do you think the cables supporting the lens would be exposed to high temperatures, since they're on the path of the solar rays being concentrated?

If it comes to single, massive Fresnel lens being difficult to manufacture, did you consider consider breaking it up into simple, linear or arched components? Similar to the Fresnel reflectors discussed here? 


Darren Soong

Sep 9, 2017
01:03

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Hi Michal.

     thank you!

1.In the front , the temperature is low.

2.Fresnel lens  consists of the lens units?The lens units are embedded in the frame.


Betsy Agar

Sep 9, 2017
12:32

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Darren, this looks like a sci fi movie--out of this world! I like the notion of concentrating solar rays because it should reduce demand for surface area, which unfortunately means covering land and water ecosystems. Why wouldn't you send the concentrated solar energy directly to the electrical grid? Can you elaborate on the rationale for/advantage of converting to Hydrogen? Also, solar PV performance can be degraded when the glass gets dirty, can you speak to the impacts of dirt on the lens and cleaning demands?


Darren Soong

Sep 10, 2017
06:39

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Hi Betsy!


Thank you!


1. The extremely high temperature can directly drive the generator, and then sent to the grid. Of course, you can also heat the media (such as water or molten salt) and then drive the engine.
2. Hydrogen production requires very high temperature, 3000 degrees C. In view of the heat resistance of equipment materials, solar energy is the best.
3. There is a cleaning device inside the system for maintenance.

Darren

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