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Tariq Banuri

Jun 2, 2016
01:33

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This is an interesting idea. Conventional wisdom has tended to favor large scale infrastructure options presumably because of their lower costs. It is quite possible that the innovative design can reverse this conventional wisdom, but this is not obvious from the details provided in the proposal (a figure of $50 million is mentioned but more details will be needed to make effective comparisons). Second, there is a question whether smaller scale operations require a larger and more sophisticated managerial work force (which might well raise unit costs). Third, given that the expanding need for water and sanitation infrastructure is in developing countries, it would be useful to see how it could be made accessible, technologically as well as economically, to them.  


Joe Abraham

Jul 13, 2016
06:39

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This concept should be explored.  Globally, we know of many alternatives to the standard US model of centralized sewage treatment, sanitization and discharge.  Many of these approaches also contribute fertilizer, clean water and methane fuel and thus would appear to be advantageous.  In the US, we need to get beyond our cultural definition of sewage as "waste" and move to consider it as a resource.

A key issue, permitting, would also include developing codes (standards) to meet.  A standardized approach could result in a "turnkey" approach (or basket of options, dependent on the specifics of the community) that could drive a replicable model and public acceptance/confidence.

The integration of concepts like water recovery and reduced water loss, plus energy recovery is commendable as well.  Ideas like aquaculture and hydroponics could be included as well.


Dimoir Quaw

Jul 29, 2016
04:32

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To quote Banurit

"Third, given that the expanding need for water and sanitation infrastructure is in developing countries, it would be useful to see how it could be made accessible, technologically as well as economically, to them"

I agree with the notion of conserving water, especially in developing agricultural communities is a problem associated with climate change and in particular, the generation of electricity from solar energy (to drive steam turbines and clean sunlight-recieving surfaces). 

I've voted :)

Please see  my proposal and vote if you like :)

https://www.climatecolab.org/contests/2016/energy-supply/c/proposal/1316801