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Hemant Wagh

Apr 15, 2015
07:37

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hello Sir, Could your reforestation activities include the uwse of fruit seeds ! A proposal detailing this idea ia available and the link is below. Kindly go through it & give valuable feedback. Thanks. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401

Helio Laubenheimer

Apr 28, 2015
02:33

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HI, Do you have an estimate of how much degraded land you are referring to? By "planted forests", are you referring to native or exotic species (eucalyptus for example),or a combination of both? What type of biomass are you expecting to use in order to fuel the power plants? Best regards

Charles Ehrhart

May 3, 2015
09:33

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Thanks for your questions, HelioLaubenhelmer. We are still in the process of entering data on our proposal. However, to answer your specific questions, we will be reforesting 70,000 ha. during the project's first phase. The State Government would like to see us slightly double that figure during phase 2. Timber species will be tropical teak and parica, a native species. We also have an MoU with a government research institution (EMBRAPA) to undertake R&D on other native species with commercial potential. Unfortunately, our options are currently limited. We will promote the transition to more native species as/when commercially viable. The plantations will grow eucalyptus for biomass.

Osero Stephen

May 21, 2015
08:34

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Hello Charles, Thank you for submitting your proposal. One thing I would suggest is for you to give even a brief answer to the remaining questions. You proposal is really a great idea, kindly try to give a brief description on the remaining question. Best wishes Osero Climate CoLab fellow

Hemant Wagh

May 21, 2015
11:08

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Hello Sir, One solution to your resource limits could be fruit seeds discarded as waste by people all over the world. A proposal detailing use of fruit seeds to grow fruit-bearing trees is available. Link is below- https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1301416/planId/1310401 Kindly go through it, give your feedback & try to utilize it. Thanks.

Kevin Boyer

May 27, 2015
02:03

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I have a number of questions and concerns about your proposal. First, you seem to assume that pasture is devoid of biodiversity, and that therefore, planting trees is only gain. However, grasslands have their own unique ecosystem full of plants, animals, microbes, etc. that only exist in those ecosystems. Moreover, in ecology, there is a notion of "edge effect", which finds that the most biologically diverse areas are actually those that occur where one ecosystem type meets another, say at the edge of grassland and forest. Therefore, I would suggest you reconsider the biodiversity effects your proposal will have. Second, have you considered the air-quality effects of creating a 35MW incinerator in this rural community? Did you include the GHG toll of burning all of this biomass and trash in your sequestration numbers? Third, composting or biogasification/composting is really the only climate responsible way to deal with inedible biomass. Is there any composting happening in Acre? Is there any opportunity to meet this community's needs through biogassing their waste, composting what is left and burning the biogas to create electricity? Last, are you familiar with Holistic Management? Is there any possibility to manage these pastures better to increase income, increase biodiversity, and, sequester atmospheric carbon in the soil?

Charles Ehrhart

May 29, 2015
09:19

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Thanks for your thoughtful comments, Kevin. First, with regards to biodiversity, we appreciate that grasslands can represent valuable habitats in-and-of-themselves. However, a few points: • These are not natural grasslands. They were created by clear-cutting forests. • Acre has more than 650,000 ha of degraded grasslands, much of which is exhibiting accelerated (and accelerating) soil erosion. Under a "without project" scenario, these grasslands would become increasingly sparse, with just a few hardy species dominating. • There are hundreds of thousands of additional grasslands under pasture in Acre. • We will, where economically feasible and otherwise attractive to landowners, establish agro-pastoral systems that combine pasture and agroforestry production. We tested this system for two-years and have had very positive results. That said, this won’t work on all farms. • The mosaic of managed plantations that we will help establish - complete with permanently protected waterways and other important features - will result in far more fractal edging than currently exists. • Our main conclusion, in-line with the IFC's Principles and Standards on Sustainability, was that the proposed land use change (grasslands to planted forests) would not result in a loss of biodiversity across the landscape. Put another way: our activities will not undermine unique habitats or threaten their dependent species. Second, projected emissions reductions from fuel-switch (diesel to biomass) were developed using the relevant CDM methodology. So, yes, they take into account all emissions from incineration. With regards to your point about local air quality, we will be installing a biomass gasification system. These systems burn exceptionally clean and, in any case, they are incomparably cleaner than the diesel generators currently in place. Third, biogasification/composting is great technology. However, it would not be a good fit for Acre: no current composting and insufficient supplies to support reliable energy production. Nor would this technology help create the market for biomass that can finance reforestation and reduce the economic drivers of deforestation in Acre.

Charles Ehrhart

May 29, 2015
09:34

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And with regards to Holistic Management of pastures, we couldn't agree more! There is great scope - especially on smaller ranches - for improved pasture management. EMBRAPA is already promoting and supporting the role-out of improved pasture management in the State. This is highly complementary to the establishment of planted forests as, in many cases, it will allow the same number of cattle to graze (sustainably) on much less land. Though, complementary, these practices cannot replace the role of reforestation in helping landowners comply with Brazil's Forest Code.