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Tiago Cruz

May 7, 2014
12:03

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Hi Alex, I'm not sure if there was kind of a problem when you were writing your proposal but it looks as it got cut somewhere in the Summary. We are very happy with the beginning of the description so please see if you can include all the proposal. Best regards!

Alex Krotz

May 8, 2014
10:40

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it appears to have been cut off, I will be sure to fix it. I am currently conducting more research online so i can write a scientifically accurate proposal. Thank you for your comment, Alex Krotz

Claudia Gossow

May 26, 2014
03:28

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Looking forward to how your proposal will unfold Alex(: And best of luck

Neil Harrison

Jun 15, 2014
10:15

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Certainly promising but still incomplete. I would like to support it but would like to know more about how this may be implemented. Also, do you have any data on the energy/climate effects of polymerization processes commonly used? How difficult is it to map a MIP to the targeted pollution? How long would the MIPS remain in the environment and what unintended consequences may they have?

Alex Krotz

Jun 16, 2014
03:40

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Thank you for your comment, I will certainly address the concerns you expressed in my proposal, right now it just has background info, i am working on writing the main body of the proposal now. On one of your concerns, MIPS are currently produced on very large scale, and are even used in some types of drug delivery, so it should be possible to make them biodegradable. Thank you, Alex Krotz

Climate Colab

Aug 6, 2014
12:25

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This is a strong concept. While this technology has been around since the 1990s, it has not been picked up by industry. We would like to see you develop out your proposal more fully. Specifically, please include more details on market applications, business models, and costs. Good luck!

Climate Colab

Sep 3, 2014
12:25

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This proposal has been advanced to the Finalist Round.

Jean-pierre Sancho

Sep 4, 2014
12:19

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not too many proposals in this section but I like new tech in plastic/Polymers and new material to adsorb/filter Co2. have you read about this: http://www.sciencedump.com/content/dutch-scientists-invent-pavement-eats-smog Also for the industries, much progress can be done with 3D printing to reduce "footprint"...that's using plastics/Polymers as well. Not only for commercial/industries infrastructure but in for consumer as well...

Osero Shadrack Tengeya

Sep 17, 2014
03:54

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Hi alex and your friends, kindly consider voting for my proposal shown on this link. https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300206/planId/1002 Thanks.

Bruce Riser

Sep 19, 2014
10:18

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Alex, I found your proposal to be most interesting, and was impressed at the level of knowledge you have generated. You covered all of the major areas of question, and it would appear to be a great potential new application of a technology that has been used elsewhere. It also addresses a major area of need. I liked the method you used of interviewing in experts in the field for support and to answer questions in a unbiased manner. It looks like you are ready to consider seeking funding for your own start up. Best of luck to you with this project, and in the future. B. Riser, PhD

Yogesh Sanghvi

Sep 22, 2014
11:42

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Nice concept...good luck!

Anne-marie Soulsby

Sep 23, 2014
04:27

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Hi Alex, Please consider voting for my proposal, https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300801/planId/1309001 Good luck with your entry! Asante/Thank-you @conserveaction

Annemieke Lommaert-blondeel

Sep 30, 2014
01:14

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Hi Alex, Your proposal was pointed out to me by a fellow-translator. I very much like the concept. As I translate quite a bit for a company which produces polymers, one of the largest in the world, who also provide funding and collaboration in this field, I thought I would give you a pointer at them, they may be interested in contributing to your research: www.solvay.com. They are at the forefront of innovation and sustainability. Good luck with your entry! Annemieke

Paul Wycherley

Mar 10, 2015
03:16

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Hi Alex, How are you? Only one request to you, if you possible please consider voting for my proposal shown on this link. https://www.linkedin.com/profile/public-profile-settings?trk=prof-edit-edit-public_profile

Michelle Hindman

May 26, 2015
07:56

Impact Assessment Fellow


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Hi Alex, Do you have any cost data or estimates of how this technology used for carbon capture purposes would increase the cost of electricity (from coal) per MWh? or how it would compare to traditional CCS technologies currently estimated to be in the €70-90/MWh range? Also, if you have made any progress on estimating the CO2 reductions impact please do include it in your proposal, or message me to discuss! Best, Michelle

Tom Mikus

Jun 1, 2015
10:02

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Alex - This is an interesting approach to gas separation! For controlling greenhouse gases, the separation process must handle large amounts of CO2 or CH4. Lots of polymer must be processed to release the captured molecules and recycle the polymer. At this early stage of technology development, it is difficult (and controversial) to estimate that cost. But you might be able to estimate how much energy is required. That could be the key to whether the process is economic (assuming the capital cost is reasonable). Another feature of this process could be the capability to separate molecules at very high purity. That is typically not necessary for greenhouse gases, but it could be very valuable for separating other molecules of commercial interest. You might consider applications that could pay for the development of the process until it becomes competitive for separating greenhouse gases. - Tom

Chad Knutsen

Jul 10, 2015
04:51

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Hi guys, great project here! my partners and I have a technology that allows for the micronizing of particles using resonant frequency and negative air pressure. It leads to particles with very active surface area. I feel it could have significant implications to the sort of projects you're describing here. Also, hemp can be used to produce carbon nanosheets with very interesting characteristics. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn400731g Could be worth looking into, RE: using renewable co2 negative resources to create these filters. Chad K. ( http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn400731g )

Cory Bytof

Sep 28, 2015
01:22

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I'm very excited about the prospect of this submission.

Since emissions from vehicles is such a huge source of GHG in the US, I've wondered if there would be a way to incorporate more cleanup of CO2 within the catalytic converter or through another filter on each vehicle on the road (or eliminate carbon emissions from vehicles altogether). We need to move faster than the adoption of electric vehicles will take, and it occurs to me if we can clean up what is already on the road we'll have a much better chance at reducing emissions significantly in a shorter amount of time. With stringent regulations perhaps something like this could be mandated by state and federal government much like catalytic converters were, and therefore speed (and guarantee) the adoption.

Is this something you are looking at or exploring within your concept?

Good luck!

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