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Sardar Mohazzam

Apr 25, 2015
07:47

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Hi Welcome to the MIT Climate Colab contest. It is a great pleasure to read your proposal. We are looking forward for further details in your proposal. Best Sardar Mohazzam

Carl Fischer

Apr 26, 2015
12:12

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There are several key steps involved: 1) The financial structure consisting of a Business Development Company (BDC) which is an established format in the US and can be listed on any stock exchange. http://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bdc.asp It allows to raise the investment funds (pre-listing)from foundations with a mission in the sustainable water and/or renewable energy sector (Mission Related Investments = MRI) https://www.missioninvestors.org/mission-investing, venture capital investors and so called accredited high net worth investors. Here the BDC's acts like a privately funded infrastructure fund. Its role is to identify and subsequently invest in start-ups and small and medium (SME) sized firms with novel technology assembled in an innovation lab http://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/blog/how-social-innovation-labs-contribute/ 2) The Lab acts as an incubator/accelerator. Together with the local community using civic crowd funding/participation platforms http://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/civic_crowdfunding_a_new_way_of_spending_down the Lab determines which of the firms identified are suitable candidates to implement their technology in the given municipality. The firms selected will receive the necessary capital from the BDC while the BDC in return will become a shareholder in these companies. 3) The companies will start implementing their technology while the BDC will be listed on a stock exchange. Once listed everybody can buy and sell shares in the BDC which means that a)unaccredited investors can invest b)initial investors (foundations etc.) can sell their shares should they so wish c)the BDC's capital remains unaffected by these transactions 4) After successful implementation the companies start to grow, create jobs and revenues and become (hopefully) profitable. The BDC continues to assist their management and helps - if necessary - finance their growth. At some point the BDC will sell its shares in these companies (hopefully) at a profit while the companies continue to operate. 5) The resulting sales proceeds will be reinvested by the BDC into a new round of investments into start-ups and SMEs thus continuously supporting new developments in the water/energy sector. Companies and start-ups that lend itself to such an approach are increasingly to be found in the waste water and sewage treatment sector, where more energy is generated while treating the water than is actually needed, i.e.: http://janickibioenergy.com/ http://www.aquaporin.dk/ http://www.monsal.com/ But also in sectors that deals with available hydro power in a city's pipe network: http://aquakin.com/ http://www.lucidenergy.com/ These are merely a few examples. Hopefully this explained our proposal in more detail.

Carl Fischer

Apr 27, 2015
01:43

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Hi Sardar, I noticed your thoughts in your 2014 proposal were somewhat along the same line of thinking. While I am in favour of crowd funding, I think the SEC more or less stopped it in its tracks. The necessary funding in the environmental sector is substantial and if it is to be privately funded significant "players" have to be attracted. The money is there. It just needs to be offered a structure - like the BDC - which offers liquidity. Once that is available it will offer both: an attractive opportunity for institutional funds as well as for unaccredited investors. Best Carl

Ghd Sports

Jun 29, 2019
03:35

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