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Martin Mizera

Mar 21, 2015
01:24

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You are going in the the vaguely right direction but all 3 points you're making a bit off. 1. Anaerobic digestion of sewage water requires huge (read - expensive) plant and is limited to max. 50 C which requires huge tanks. 2. There are NO biofertilizers. Bio- implies carbon-based, and plants do not use carbon, other than as CO2. The only fertilizers are INorganic - sulfur, phosphorus, nitrogen, potassium and microelements. A lot of people are trying to peddle waste from pyrolysis (they call it biochar, although it contains >200 carcinogenic carbon-based compounds), since they can't clean the pyrolysis byproducts. Don't go there, it's a waste of your time. 3. Sludge transports itself through the sewage system; it's mainly gravity-based. Find a good technology, like clean gasification, and run with it to see where it takes you. Regards, Martin

Jan Kunnas

Mar 21, 2015
03:34

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Dear Martin, Thank you for your comments. 1. Anaerobic digestion of slurry is applicated at even at the scale of single farms. In Sweden, where I live, the size of the digestion chambers used varies from 100 m3 to 30 000 m3. Adding biogas production to the sewage plant will obviously create some extra costs, but they will be recouped trough the value of the biogas produced and the reduced need to transport sludge. The transportation and deposit costs of sludge might be up 50 % of the total cost of waste water treatment. 2. It think I get your point. Perhaps I should use just fertilizer, as these inorganic component are included in the treated slurry. 3. Please clarify. The gas received trough this process is mainly methane and carbon dioxide, cannot get much cleaner. Thanks, Jan

Hemant Wagh

Mar 22, 2015
12:49

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Professor JanK, Respected Sir, You are more correct than you would think to be. Organic matter composts are considered to be good manure/fertilizer. So you may go ahead with those that you could lay your hands on. Sincere Regards..

Hemant Wagh

Mar 24, 2015
05:44

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Professor JanK, Respected Sir, You have very aptly pointed out the use of biogas for running a bus service. If we could extend it to both public as well as personal transport the the fossil fuels would be able to rest for ever, peacefully for both the fuel and mankind, deep within the earth. Sincere Regards.

Jan Kunnas

Mar 24, 2015
05:18

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Dear Hemant Wagh, Thank you for your inspiring comments. Your are perfectly right that also personal transport could be running on biogas. Public transport could though be the best starting point as they do not need an extended network of fueling stations as they are running within a predetermined area.

Jamie Bemis

Mar 24, 2015
09:26

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Hi Jan, Thank you for submitting your proposal! You are absolutely right that a circular approach makes more sense than a linear approach to sustainability efforts. You've got a lot of great ideas but your proposal would be strengthened if you picked 1-2 and got really specific (and feel free to submit more than one proposal)! For instance, you could focus on reusing wastewater to produce biogas. If you could describe each step in this process in detail, with estimated costs, energy consumption, energy offset, and net emissions, it would present a stronger argument. You could also do the same with home retrofits. I look forward to reviewing your revised proposal! Jamie

Jan Kunnas

Mar 24, 2015
09:12

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Dear Jamie, I will think trough your suggestion. How can I take that into account without loosing the main idea of the proposal: to move from a singular zero carbon goal towards an circular approach in all activity. Jan

Hemant Wagh

Mar 24, 2015
10:23

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Respected Sir, To 'Aim Higher' the inclusion of personal/private transport would be very desirable.

Jamie Bemis

Apr 1, 2015
09:07

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Hi Jan, In regards to maintaining the overall idea of a circular vs. linear approach, I think you could state your idea (the more broad, overall point), then get specific on 1-2 detailed examples of how it would work, and then summarize by reiterating the overall idea of the circular approach. This would provide the compelling argument of a detailed example-- proving that the approach can work and be cost effective-- while reinforcing the broader point. Thoughts? Jamie

Jan Kunnas

Apr 1, 2015
01:40

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Dear Jamie, Your are perfectly right. I am currently in the process of rewriting the proposal in exactly that approach. Please check back in a few weeks time, and it should be done.

Hemant Wagh

Apr 2, 2015
02:26

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Respected Sir, I recollect a phrase in this context, "No Man Is An Island."

Hemant Wagh

Apr 7, 2015
11:55

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Using Fruit-Seeds (considered as waste) for most beneficial purposes for planet & mankind as shown in https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401 would be one of the best steps towards circular economy !

Jan Kunnas

Apr 8, 2015
04:09

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Dear Hemant Wagh, You are perfectly right "No Man Is An Island." In this context I consíder this to mean that others will follow the good examples provided by their neighbors, friends etc. Planting fruit trees would be an good option, if we could quarantee that resulting fertilizer would be of such quality that we could use it to grow food. Otherwise it must be restricted to non-food purposes, trees, flowers... In the long run trought the education of people that the sewer is no trash can this could be achieved.

Hemant Wagh

Apr 8, 2015
11:34

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Respected Sir, Parts of plants & fruits unused by mankind except seeds which should be used as per https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401 can form good manure, fertilizer; easier than dealing with human excreta, increase green cover with the seeds themselves, involve all age groups in collecting storing and distributing the seeds easily. So this is best initial step.

Hemant Wagh

Apr 11, 2015
12:45

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Sir, I am unable to access your member-profile as well...!!

Hemant Wagh

Apr 14, 2015
10:55

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Parts of plants & fruits unused by mankind except seeds, seeds be used as per https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300103/planId/1310401 , can form good manure, fertilizer; easier than dealing with human excreta, increase green cover with the seeds themselves, involve all age groups in collecting storing and distributing the seeds easily. So this is best initial step.

Hemant Wagh

Apr 16, 2015
11:12

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Professor Jank, Indeed marvellous !

Hemant Wagh

Apr 18, 2015
02:41

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http://www.efb-greenroof.eu/verband/fachbei/fa01_englisch.html says, "However the efficiency of green roofs as thermal barriers is dependent on the amount of water held within the system. Water retention can increase the amount of heat lost through the system and therefore any efficiency gains are dependent on daily conditions. It is therefore difficult to provide accurate figures on the net effect of green roofs on energy efficiency during the winter months."

Hemant Wagh

Apr 22, 2015
04:51

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Professir Jank, Those grassy rooftops were very nice to look at, enhanced the beauty of your right-up, you should have let them be, instead of axing altogether!

Michael Hayes

Apr 24, 2015
07:54

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Jan, I not only greatly support your work within this suite of technologies, I've gone so far as proposing each and every aspect of this work in prior work both within the CoLab environment and elsewhere. If you need any useful links, please let me know. Michael

Michal Williams

May 12, 2015
08:26

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I'd be happy if I could just get the darn Building Department to tell me whether they'll issue a permit for a graywater system.

Jan Kunnas

May 12, 2015
10:37

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For officials sticking to current solutions is an safe and easy response. To overcome this barrier of conformity a common shared vision of change is needed.

Hemant Wagh

May 27, 2015
08:06

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Respected Sir, The Swami Vivekananda Fruit Trees Expansion Mission would help us change the mindset towards better appreciation of Climate Needs & Solutions. I like your theme. In fact I was wondering how the theme could be improved. I request you to kindly reconsider the 'most reflective city' aspect as it would have major winter penalties because the city has low insolation & more cooling degree days.

Jan Kunnas

May 27, 2015
04:06

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Interesting question. My initial response is that that is not such a big problem, as the sun comes from a lower angle during the winter time. Thus the decreased amount of cooling needed summertime should be larger than then increased need of heating. During the coldest period much of the ground and roofs will be covered by reflective snow anyway. It might even be good to leave the snow on the roofs as it increases the isolation of buildings.

Hemant Wagh

May 28, 2015
04:32

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A sufficiently sloping roof enables to drain water and snow and allows Sun radiation to enter the building during day. Climatology www.slideshare.net638 × 479Search by image ROOF • A sufficiently sloping roof with skylight enables to drain water and snow and allow sun radiation to enter the building during day.

Jan Kunnas

Jun 3, 2015
04:26

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Indeed, Issues like recommendations for the angle and direction of the roofs should be incorporated into the building codes. As well as relaxed regulations for climate friendly solutions as discussed before.

Hemant Wagh

Jun 15, 2015
01:50

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Painting the roofs black/dark would be better addition in colder climate as it would enable utilize whatever solar radiation strikes the sloped roofs to heat the buildings. So instead of reflecting white roofs absorbing black/dark roofs would serve the purpose better.
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