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Robert Dedomenico

Jun 17, 2014
06:13

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I think this has some merit. The main point, "You can only manage... what you can measure," is beyond argument. I like it.

Paul Wolfram

Jun 17, 2014
10:17

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Do you use the mobility card only in your car in combination with the digital tachograph? If yes, how can it measure walked and cycled ways? In general a good idea, I think. I think there could be issues arising concerning privacy and hence a certain reluctance of car drivers against the digital tachograph though.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 17, 2014
10:01

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Paul, Are you sure you are not reading your own assumptions into her proposal? (Regarding the privacy concerns?) Or is this something that was simply left unaddressed? I have long thought that with car registration should come an EZ pass (or equivalent) tag. After all, motor vehicle operation on public roads is a priviledge, not a right, and includes the legal responsibility to folllow many laws, including carrying liability insurance. If we used information as we could... then uninsured motorists would not be able to use tolled road facilities, such as bridges, tunnels, and turnpikes. And there should be nothing wrong with that, right? So, I agree that there will be discussions about privacy, but I am not sure that this proposal is weak because of that. I don't think this proposal will solve every problem, but it has the potential to contributte to making things better, and for that I still like it. It's good that you offered those comments, too. I like the questions in the first paragraph, and look forward to more details along those lines myself.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 17, 2014
10:14

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I think one of the reasons I am drawn to this proposal as having potential to contribute to making improvements, is the great utility I myself found in the transportation statistics compiled by the US Bureau of Transportation Statistics, including several years of National Household Travel Surveys. Without these data, it becomes much more difficult to predict effects of proposed innovations. I see this proposal making those data more precise by direct measurement vs. survey, and this could be very useful in both making plans and evaluating outcomes.

Eva Gonzalez

Jun 18, 2014
04:28

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Hi Paul, You are right. I´m completely aware there would be issues concerning privacy (although i have to say that when using WhatsApp, for example, you are giving your ok to a private company to locate you...why not to the government? But that is a very different discussion!). Nevertheless, one of the important elements of the idea is it´s phasing. PHASE 1: digital tachograph with NO geo-spatial location (the most basic scenario). This means the tachograph would only register speed without knowing where the car is, and therefore not being able to identify lower speed limits (as would be in urban areas). Where I live, the maximum speed limit is 120 km/h; and there is an obligation of controlling the cars overall state (emissions, brakes, insurance, etc) each certain time (depending on the cars age). If the control was annual, a report on time spent "over the maximum limit" could be generated; and sent to the government. This report could be of use for charging fines. As I said, the fines are not thought to be punitive; they are a tool for limiting speed. Less speed, less GHG emissions. On the other hand, less speed, more security. Yes, I know, there is always someone that argues that there are roads (freeways) in which higher speed can be reached with no safety issues. False!!! The problem is not the car, and not the road. The "problem" is that everyone has the right to drive. When I say "everyone" i´m thinking of the young unexperienced driver, or the elder that has lost part of his/her capacities and lives in the middle of nowhere, where the nearest bus stop is 2 km away... By reducing (limiting) speed, we guarantee nearly all of us can feel comfortable driving. Going back to the fines: of course each car can have more than one driver, but wouldn´t it be nice to know if your son is driving too fast when you lend him the car? Each owner has the responsability for the use that is given to his car. Thank you for your comment!!! I´ll look for time to develop the mobility card idea more. Any suggestion welcome!

Eva Gonzalez

Jun 18, 2014
04:51

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Dear Domenico, You are right. Huge amounts of money are invested in mobility surveys. Where I live, these are made every 10 years. Any planning strategy is based on the data of those surveys (that can be 10 years old....). And more than that, when planning, you can be grateful if you have those statistics. In some places there is no data at all. Monitoring mobility (I´m sure there is some way to create an equilibrium between privacy and functionality)have loads of potential uses. Thanks again!

Elizabeth Marcello

Jul 13, 2014
06:17

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tierracomunera - I really like this idea -- it reminds me of plugs that monitor kilowatt usage. One thing that might make the proposal stronger is to talk in more detail about implementation and scale. I see that you address this when you talk about implementing it in every country of the world, but it might be more realistic if you think about it incrementally. To me, this sounds like the perfect kind of project for a local/city government, especially in cities with energy/water/power limitations/crises. I also think that, especially in the current political climate in the US, this type of project would be more likely to pass at the local level. Perhaps your timeline could include piloting at the local level somewhere like LA or SF and then have it move to possibly being adopted statewide. Then nationwide? Thinking about timeline will also help us understand how you'd like to scale up. Just an idea... In any case - very cool idea. Kudos to you.

Eva Gonzalez

Jul 19, 2014
04:14

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Thank you very much for your comments! The idea has to be developed more, but is in essence very easily implementable from a technical point of view. I don't think the first test should necessarily be limited to a city, but on a certain group of vehicles. Technology today enables easy control wherever the cars are located if there is gps access. After proving Its feasibility any new car should be equipped with the tachograph. And in a first phase tax rewards could be given to the compliant drivers.

Eva Gonzalez

Jul 19, 2014
04:10

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The project would require: definition of the tachographs technical requisites, related environmental legislation and tax aspects, prototype, pilot case implementation, etc.I don't think a bottom up approach is suitable, national public bodies should get involved with the project from the first phase with the aim of developing a structure with maximum functionalities. Hoping to have the opportunity of working on this project! Thanks!

Climate Colab

Aug 5, 2014
08:35

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The idea is smart and potentially effective. However, the proposed solution is not new and, hence, the key points should be 1) the detailed description of how this card will work out, highlighting potential improvements with respect to existing applications of mobility credit schemes; 2) the development of a methodology to evaluate the impacts and 3) the detailed assessment of all the implementation problems. The above issues are also linked, since a serious impact evaluation is also very important in order to obtain political consensus on the action. The proposal, actually, is quite poor and vague on all these sides.
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