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Carlos Gershenson

Jun 3, 2014
06:02

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Interesting idea. Could it be cheaper to implement with drones?

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
07:50

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The initial setup would be cheaper with helicpter drones, but the total cost of ownership would be much more. Using helicopter drones for deliveries would have these characteristics: 1. Fair weather only. 2. Zero security. 3. Infinite liability. 4. High specific energy. In reality, the vehicles involved in this proposal are drones, aren't they? They just operate in an enclose netork instead of flying, which gives them these characteristics: 1. All weather. 2. High security. 3. Near zero liability. 4. Near zero specific energy. The initial implementation cost will be worth it, just as over the long term it is worth building a shelter instead of just a campfire.

Sardar Mohazzam

Jun 4, 2014
10:57

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Hello Robert, It is a great idea. I am going through your ideas, and will write in detail shortly. Stay tuned. Best Mohazzam

Chad Knutsen

Jun 4, 2014
11:17

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Very interesting. Sounds right in line with the Venus Project. http://www.thevenusproject.com/. I very much like the idea of taking the mundane, non creative tasks that do not require a humans free will or imagination to complete and giving them to robots etc. And as much as I love driving fast loud cars, it is something I could give up in exchange for having a future on this planet. Eventually, I think people will not be burdened with "jobs", and will able to follow their passions, which would inspire much more greatness in a society than a bunch of pimply faced kids expecting to work a 9-5 till they retire and die (which tends to be the case now-a-days). Your proposal is very much in line with those aims. Which I like. One questions. as for moving objects along inside an enclosed system. I'm sure folks here besides m'self are curious about the scale of the system (width of transport tubes or other structures etc. And also, what materials would be going into their construction? If concrete is involved, it wuill overall have a less positive impact than if Hempcrete for example were used. And even less materials and energy could be used if the system could be built using the methods of construction proposed in my proposal. (https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1300403/phaseId/1300403/planId/1305704) All in all. I look forward to seeing further updates and wish you the very best! We truly are designing the new systems for the new world. Chad

Captain D

Jun 4, 2014
11:08

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Robert I see this idea as a scaled up version of valet service where what people want is "delivered" in a way that uses less energy/resources and is therefore more cost effective than paying someone else or even doing it yourself. The concept is no different that hiring a dog walker, since it would employ others to do something that a person either cannot do themselves or just don't have the time for. A dozen suggestions to help kickstart your plan: 1. Perhaps some large seccessful Corp.'s like Amazon, FedEx and/or BYD would want to be a Sponsor, since they would want to offer this service to their customers globally. 2. Since you are using human power, I think you should also tout the health benefits of employing this type of service since those that do the "work" will be also doing exercise which will improve their health. Seniors tend to have lots of time, and earning money money by providing this service would be a win-win for everyone. 3. Include the use of electric bicycles and other electric modes of transportation, since they would enable deliveries to far greater distances in much shorter times, since modern eBicycles can easily do 30 mph and cruise through traffic congestion, as the famous NY bicycle messengers have proven long ago. 4. Add the creation of local HUBS, so that your couriers can not only deliver items in both directions but "handoff" items to others in order to not have to duplicate the same travel as another courier going the same place. 5. "Delivery boys" used to deliver groceries on bicycles which had large baskets on them and that image might be a great logo that people would identify with. 6. Identify an initial testing situation/location so that everyone can better understand how your idea can be put into practice. This could be food delivery in a urban setting where people don't want to lose their parking place or even in a senior neighborhood where people don't want to deal with doing their own errands, possibly due of physical limitations. 7. Be prepared for many businesses to sponsor your service since it would mean they could provide for more customers without having to physically deal with them, which would save them from having to fund larger operations, because they could offer "deliver Only" pricing. 8. Those that do the delivering, will also earn tips to help increase what they make per hour. 9. Once someone uses this service, they will not only use it again for additional services, but they will tell their friends, which will help expand the user base rapidly. 10. Every delivery will have a "minus" carbon credit assigned to it ad depending upon the locality, those credits may provide the ongoing money needed to not only "run" the service but keep expanding it 11. Once established, the same website that offers deliveries can also target services and offer "special" deals since they will be able to match up potential new customers with ongoing deliveries to customers at nearby addresses. This would dramatically increase the cost effectiveness of the entire operation. 12. It is human nature that people like to be waited upon and this service would provide that human interaction that many, not just those housebound, would employ because it would offer something that is missing in our fast paced society which is person to person interaction.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
12:01

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Thanks for the comments, Chad. I went immediately to the venus project. I see broad vision there... perhaps beyond what is intended to be achieved by CargoFish Physical Internet. That is OK, though. We must all do what we can do. The primary material is not limited to just one. PVC (polyvinylchloride) pipe would work, but I prefer HDPE (high density polyethylene). Right now the raw material to make HDPE is being produced abundantly, and as long as we don't start burning it to fuel large cars to and from the convenience stores, we can employ it in building a lasting infrastructure. This will make it more convenient than ever to obtain the necessities (and niceties) of life, without having to contribute to congestion, pollution, and accident rates. As for scale... it will begin with a mere "capillary" gage. After this capillary network has grown up, it will need arterial support of a larger gage. This plan is merely copying nature. What organism has arteries but no capillaries? The concept was really very well received at the First International Physical Internet Conference, Laval University, Quebec, last week. Please do look into that initiative, too. There are many people working hard on improving efficiencies to help solve the problems that we recognize. I want in particular to point out Dr. Benoit Montreuil, without whose encouragement and support I may not have attended the conference. Thanks again, Ben. Thank you, too, Chad. I'll have another look at your proposal myself, although I have to admit it is in an area not near to my strengths.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
12:11

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captd: Thanks for volunteering to joing the proposal and welcome! There is a lot to fill you in on, as I have been developing this opportunity for just over four years now, have invested no less than four thousand hours of research and development, and have drawn from decades of experience in nuclear submarine and commercial power operations, as well as many related hobbies and interests. I'll answer your comments, numbered: 1. I have been turned down and/or ignore by every entity under the sun... except for The Physical Internet Initiative, and several hundred indiduals I have pitched to face to face, many of whom are friends and family. 2. The power source is electricity. It uses so little that there are options other than grid power, but that is a separate problem. Most power considerations beyond grid power are really most important for reliability, but some as well for marketing, and some for both. What I mean is... a "bicycle generator" operated by the average person could easily propel fifty fully loaded vehicles at thirty mile per hour each. 3. So... the use of vehicles that carry people is planned for a later stage of implementation of this technology. It is best if this capillary, parcel only network is in place first. 4. I have some very interesting ideas about how best to accomplish many aspects of operations. These plans go far beyond what has been built so far on only a few thousand dollars. A little outside support will change all that. 5. Again, persons will not be necessary for these deliveries. No different than electricity, water, natural gas, etc. 6. From last week's conference, I have been requested to compose two white papers and a business plan, for two proposed projects and to garner support from a large philanthropic entity. These will take a few more days to complete, and no outcome is guaranteed. I would very much like to make some progress here, with or without other support. 7. This new utility will change retail of fast moving consumer goods in a big way. 8. No delivery crews... but there will be an operating and maintenance team. 9. People will prefer this service to driving their car every time they run out of... whatever. I agree. 10. Operation of this system, at two Watt-hours per vehicle mile, vs. three hundred Watt-hours per vehicle mile for a typical electric car, represents about two orders of magnitude energy savings. Of course... if several bags of groceries are being retrieved, then several of these little autonomous vehicles will need to run, and the savings will only be one order of magnitude. But... that is still 90% less energy intensive. 11. Oh, yes... a household will likely schedule a certain set of deliveries, with active exceptions to add to or delete from the next delivered order. It really does open up some interesting possibilities, doesn't it? 12. Well, this utility is much like the phone. I prefer seeing people, but when I need to talk to them and I cannot visit, it is good to have the phone option. So thanks again for supporting, commenting, and joining. You can find more information at www.cargofish.com. In fact... there is a contest still running... a residual from a Shark Tank audition I did earlier this month, that will be determined by popular vote. Perhaps you could cast a vote? It allows one vote per day, but there are only three days left. This link to it is easy to find at www.cargofish.com -Robert DeDomenico

Aaron Marcuse-kubitza

Jun 4, 2014
02:24

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How is the impact of this different from the Postal Service or a package shipper, which split the fuel cost of the truck between hundreds of packages? Shipping companies, too, are much more efficient than a shopper driving their car; how does this compare?

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
02:12

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This compares well. It is about on par with freight railroads in the US, which average about 325 BTU per ton-mile. Of course... this enables movements on a micro scale. CargoFish does better on energy efficiency that USPS, Fedex, UPS, and/or courier services on energy for two reasons. First... the delivery vehicle averages about 50% load capacity at best, and this only when it begins a delivery route completely full. It of course returns completely empty, and I haven't analysed to the nth degree, but 50% full is not a low ball assumption, knowing what we know. Now... the delivery vehicle must move a along a route that adds up to many more ton miles of just cargo, than spliting up the parcels and sending each only to its destination. Next... the delivery truck is rolling on rubber tires, which have a comparitively high coefficient of rolling resistance vs what CargoFish is using. And of course... with an instant delivery utility you won't have to wait a day for your order. You will have it within minutes, for common items, and gradually longer depending how exotic the item is. Give it a chance to sink in a bit... I've been at it for several years and gave it a great deal of thought and analysis myself. Thanks for reading and commenting. If I haven't answered you fully, please let me know. Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
02:04

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Let's just get a little more analytical in answering you... I've questioned the UPS and Fedex drivers many times, and a typical route in my area is between 150 and 200 miles. Usually this takes the driver 8 to 10 hours, and consumes 10 to 15 gallons of fuel. The average package I will assume is 5 lbs, because I do not have that data point. ( We do know from Amazon's drone story on 20/20 last November, that 86% of Amazon shipments are 5 lbs or less. ) Another unknown is the total pound - miles from UPS center to each individual destination, but we'll try saying there are about 180 packages to be delivered (again, based on interviewing the drivers,) and the typical distance is 25 miles. So... 5 lbs x 180 pieces x 25 miles = 11.25 short ton miles. This would take CargoFish 180 x 25 x 2 Whr/mile = 9 kWhrs of electricity, or about $1.53 at seventeen cents per kilowatt-hour, my residential rate. The truck is using about 12 gallons of diesel, which is close to $50 worth of fuel, and is much more energy. How much more? Road diesel is about 130,000 BTU per gallon, so 12 gallons is 1.56 million BTUs. The current US average heat rate for production of electricity from fuel is about 10,450 BTU per kWhr, so that much fuel could have produced about 149 kWhr of electricity. Even after the 7% distribution losses, and allowing another 20% usage loss through the system power supply and other factors, this is still showing a great advantage for the CargoFish system. I hope that helps shed some light on the advantages from a pure energy standpoint. -Robert

Dan Frost

Jun 4, 2014
08:40

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Robert, I have to come at this from a practical business and cost stand point. It seems to me that the cost to implement would be tremendous. Have you considered the cost of fabrication, construction, liability, operation, maintenance and so on? Who owns the system? How does it make money? It it's owned by the taxpayer and the federal government is responsible for implementation then figure the cost to be quadrupled.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
11:30

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Yes, Dan, of course I have. It seems to me you could not possibly have had time yet to really consider either the costs, or the revenues. My estimates on installation are from an absolute low of $75 per mile for two lane install. This is only in easy soil, between towns, along roadside, cut and cover. New development installation would be next cheapest, with the increase being not cost per mile, but each service connection, which would be a few thousand each, and around 55 per mile. Liability will be pretty low. O&M will be far less than for delivery routes, which must have drivers and full size vehicles. Ownership could be either public or private. Could you offer any real basis for the jab that government ownership would be four times as expensive? (I'm not saying its not true... just that it is an unsubstantiated claim.) On the revenue side, remember that this can handle groceries, other consumer goods, mail, and trash removal. Those are some pretty significant revenue streams. Out of a total $17 trillion US economy, $3 trillion is fast moving consumer goods. The value added in the delivery chain is about 50%, and it costs time and money to operate a car to retrieve things. Delivery drivers for mail and parcel must be paid, and those last few miles by present methods cost as much as the first several thousand miles. With a network system such as this, well connected, the value generated will support an installation average cost of about $500,000 per mile. Has the Internet been worth it? How about municipal water? Or sewer? Or gas? Where have we installed a utility that was a total failure? What percentage of cases does that represent? Finally, why do we subsidize transit? Should we stop? If not, then what is wrong with seeing if something might be more effective at providing service and reducing congestion for our money? I see many more reasons to keep going and see what can come of this concept, than reasons to drop it like there is absolute certainty that it would be a complete waste of time. Aren't there billions, if not trillions, invested in a wide variety of material and parcel handling schemes all over the world? How would USPS, Fedex, and UPS carry on service if none of the parcels were sorted automatically at their sorting hubs? These were very expensive. Would it be cheaper to have gone on sorting by hand? Would it have been faster? Or more effective? Are you certain that this will fail? Even if you are, could you be wrong?

Chris Taylor

Jun 5, 2014
01:55

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Hi Robert - Thanks for your message. I noticed you put this idea forward last year and the response was rather meagre to say the least. The response surprised me because I look at our transport system today - moving 1.5 ton objects around just to pick up some groceries, or to transport oneself - and it makes me realise that we really aren’t as smart as we like to make ourselves believe. Cars... palm to forehead! You were right to compare it to the semi-finalist winner last year “Solar Serpent”. I saw nothing original about this idea. However, it was politically feasible, and I think feasibility plays a big role when Climate CoLab choose the winners. The government loan-guarantees being given away for solar projects reduces risk at no extra expense to the developers, so there is more chance of getting funding for solar projects than a physical internet. I think you’ve received some brilliant advice from some of the commenters above, and considering how long you’ve been thinking about a Physical Internet, anything I give would probably be clutching at straws, but here goes anyway: How about approaching a large supermarket in a residential district, and ask them to help with funding a “Physical LAN” Yep! Connect the supermarket to every house in it’s vicinity. It would guarantee dominant market share. (You’ll probably get the competition ombudsman knocking at your door.) If it would prove profitable for one supermarket, then... Just a thought.

Dario Biggi

Jun 5, 2014
02:35

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Hello Robert, It is a really great idea should be delivered a feasibility study with a good business case. Sounds good to me and to other people I discussed expert in this field. Go ahead! Best regards, Dario

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
07:26

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Dario, Gracie! I have been studying the area we spoke of, via Google maps. I will be in touch soon by email for what information cannot be gleaned from online, and with that can finish the paper. I am all ahead full! Thanks again, Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
08:48

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Chris, Thank you for reading my proposal, and providing your comments. I have approached many different entities to date, including supermarkets. There are about 45,000 individual supermarkets in the US, and each offers a selection of about 45,000 different items. Daily gross receipts are $1.5 billion, (some sources tell me $2 billion,) which is at least half a trillion a year. The gross margin in this category is about 40%, and there are several overhead expenses in the retail facility that could be eliminated with a direct sales model. This is why there have been so many grocery delivery business models tried. We all would love the convenience, and everybody knows this, (though some will deny it,) and when the prices are lower and the service is better, then it is a sure thing. Then there are all the other uses for the infrastructure, each of which helps generate value. Yes, I have been working on this for over 4,000 hours of R&D. I have a prototype vehicle in development. I have fabricated the first section of track. I have designs on far more than I have had time or resources to realize so far, which is why I have turned to contests for support. How can I build a utility by myself? At some point, this must become a group effort. About last years response I will not say much more. Suffice it to say that I was very disappointed, and angry. But why? It is just human nature at play, and nobody is purposely doing anything wrong. I need to remember that. About governement support... Let us compare electric car subsidies to what would be possible if the CargoFish Physical Internet concept were funded. Each electric car (EV) sold in the US is eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit, and a significant fraction of all EV sales are in states that offer additional incentives in the thousands. The result of each of these cars being sold is that some number of annual vehicle miles travelled (VMT) are driven on electrical energy instead of petroleum. This number is perhaps 15,000 miles each. So just taking the federal incentive, and amortizing over the first ten years of ownership, this is 5 cents per mile federal incentive. Let us neglect for now the state incentives, and the higher purchase price paid by consumers even after the incentives. For CargoFish Physical Internet, how much traffic could be entirely offset, (not just switched over to another fuel source,) by an "incentive" or "investment" or "expense", whichever it should be called. Consider a typical US commercial shopping district. There is likely a minor arterial roadway, with at least two lanes each direction, serving a strip mall anchored by a supermarket. I have poured over the NHTSA BTS data, available for anyone to look up online, and see that it is not unreasonable to assume that each of these lanes is handling about 2 million VMT per lane mile per year. From the data it can also be seen that between 10% and 15% of private driving of cars and light trucks is not for the purpose of transporting any person... but for moving some object or stuff. (For now we will ignore light automobile VMT by commercial concerns.) We will however, acknowledge that the traffic we are about to consider is along the road service to the shopping district, and estimate that about half of that traffic is shoppers driving to shop. So we have 4 lanes, 2 million VMT per lane mile, half due to shopping. That is 4 million VMT per year, per mile, overall. If a CargoFish Physical Internet system were installed here, and could capture only one quarter of this share on average, over the first ten years, then we have 10 million miles of driving eliminated per mile of system. At 5 cents per mile government support, that comes to $500,000 per mile in available installation incentives. This is right about on par with many municipal water installations across the US. And why should anybody expect a system such as this to last only 10 years? A car might be worn out by then, or need a new battery, but an undergound pipe of modern high density polyethylene (HDPE) is expected to last for decades... probably 100 years. I do hope that people considering whether this is something deserving of further development and examination, especially those in a position to help it in that direction, will carefully and thoroughly examine all available facts, and ask questions. I can provide answers. I have done some homework. If you agree... please do vote your support of the proposal! Either way, thank you for continuing the dialogue. -Robert

Musyani Chewe

Jun 5, 2014
10:35

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A Great proposal, leveraging the power of the internet of things

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
10:45

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Dear Musyani Chewe, Thank you for reading and commenting on my proposal. I have been working hard to bring this concept to implementation, and just being noticed is no easy task, so again thank you. -Robert DeDomenico

M R

Jun 5, 2014
11:33

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Why build this transportation system for various goods, when we could improve our transportation systems for people? I don't always know what I want or need when I go out to a store- I find it easier to browse for a specific item in a store, rather than over the internet. I also enjoy it. I think that you are right in identifying the pointlessness of driving a 4000lb car in exchange for receiving 10lbs of groceries. However, I think the focus should be more on a 4000lb car carrying one person verses eight... etc. Regardless of whether or not people will want this service, people will still need to transport themselves from a to b. I think that it would be more efficient to use this money to improve public transportation rather than the shipping/logistics industry.

M R

Jun 5, 2014
11:35

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To add: I think what you are specifically going to do is a bit unclear in the proposal.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
11:04

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Hello Mr57, Why insist on using a 4,000 lb vehicle even when you know you will often only be bringing home a 2 lb item? How could you possibly ever improve upon a system designed to move 200 lb people, so that it is also the optimum for moving a 1 oz prescription? How can you deal with individual needs for simple and small items effectively, if you insist that the only way to approach the problem is to see how to mass them all up into piles and transport the big pile? Why don't we just get rid of all cars and use busses? Sure, people will still need to transport themselves. We used to make routine trips to the well or river, to retrieve our water. We simply open up the tap now. But has that meant that we are no longer free to roam around? I think the big picture of the proposal is pretty clear by now. Imagine how hard it would be to convey all of the technical specifics of how exactly to implement it? How many people know those details of every piece of modern magic that they use? I thank you for your comments, and giving me the oppportunity to address them. If there is anything that I have still failed to address, don't hesitate to say so. Sincerely, Robert

Galen Wilkerson

Jun 5, 2014
12:45

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Hi, You asked for feedback - just being constructive. I strongly suggest re-writing from scratch. You need to answer, rather than ask, the question about what this is and how it will be implemented. Your pitch statement is abstract and a question. Doesn't tell anything about what you'll do. I stopped reading shortly after that. I think you can (and have to) re-write it. Best if you do this as an interview with a friend. Try to tell them, __in as few words as possible__, what you'll actually do. (not what the problem is) best

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
03:18

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Thanks, Galen. Do you mind offering just what it is specifically that you don't understand? Perhaps it was in the parts of the proposal you decided not to read. I can tell you which part, that way you won't have to waste your time reading more than you really want to. All the best, Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
03:41

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Reading much more than you really want to is a lot like routinely moving much more than you really want to isn't it? It's really a big waste of energy. But I'll read your reply anyway... if you have one.

John Wood

Jun 5, 2014
03:00

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I love the practical notion of rationalising at the global scale, however, please let me be a little idealistic in my response. Something to bear in mind is the fact that efficient (e.g. cheaper) mobility can soon encourage suboptimal growth patterns if prioritised. E.g. efficient new cars + roads soon create habitual commuters. High-speed links can turn distant villages into large towns/megaxities. We tend to design cities for mobilities when they should/could be designed for accessibilities. In short, your logistical reasoning is good, but perhaps it could be factored into more optimal patterns of urban diversity?

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
03:27

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Dear John Wood, Good point. Have you heard of the "Jervin's Paradox"? One of the proposals in Climate Colab is about dealing with it. My proposal only works on delivering far more value from a given overutilized resource: transportation energy. Unfortunately, greater efficiency has historically led to greater demand. Take the steam engine. Thomas Newcomb's steam engine would spray condensing water right into the steam cylinder, which was inefficient. When James Watt developed an engine with a separate condensor, the total efficiency went up considerably, which led to many more useful applications for the steam engine, and more demand for coal. But, would you suggest that all of our efforts to be more energy efficient should be abandoned? You see... I believe that ultimately, Earth cannot support an infinitely growing human population. Here and now though, I am just trying to propose something worthwhile for reducing emmisions from the transportation sector. I like what I have come up with, because it is far more efficient, and convenient, so it's use won't have to be mandated by law. Did you know that in my state, it is illegal to leave your car idling while you are inside the convenience store? This is to reduce emissions and save energy. I am trying to make it easier for you to avoid wanting to drive that car to that "convenience" store. It just isn't really all that convenient, or energy efficient, compared to a Physical Internet utility. Thanks for commenting! -Robert

Kathy Pelish

Jun 5, 2014
04:59

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Hi Robert, Sailors from Seattle here. I've asked my VP to review and reply to you. For one thing, he has his degree in Engineering Physics from Case Western. His direct email is frank.calma@gmail.com. Please keep us updated; your vision is fascinating and we'd love to be a beta tester. Kathy President and Cofounder Salish Sea Trading Cooperative www.salishseatrading.coop Working in harmony with Nature's gifts of wind and tide, transporting local goods

Kathy Pelish

Jun 5, 2014
04:26

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See also this: http://www.citylab.com/commute/2014/06/how-to-make-mass-transit-financially-sustainable-once-and-for-all/372209/ How to Make Mass Transit Financially Sustainable Once and for All The seven-part case for operating public transportation as a public utility.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
05:13

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Kathy, Thank you so much for saying so. I enjoyed the Seattle area greatly when my submarine was in refueling overhaul, 1988 to 1980. I used to hang glide at Cape Kiwanda, Orgegon, and Dog Mountain, Washington. You live in a beautiful part of the country. I will send an email right away. Thanks again, Robert DeDomenico

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
06:32

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I don't want this to taken as dismissive of any of the other support shown for the proposal here, but I do want to highlight the background of one of the supporters of this proposal. I only know Sandy from a presentation her company gave on a software product/service. Her calibur as a professional was obvious to the nth degree! Not only that, the product was really about the best we had seen, in all areas, except having not already been in the specific use that we intended, by our specific industry. It was only due to a very recent software purchase disaster, that there was so much aversion to being the first again on the replacement, that so many others influenced the decision to go with the well established, (and granted... almost as good in many ways, perhaps even a little more grown up in some of the industry specific graphics, and proferred by likeable and knowledgeable individuals, too), and not get the latest and greatest. I saw the value down the road in it. Others were just afraid. So, that's my disclosure, so you can see what bias there may be. Essentially, I was able to explain face to face to Sandy about this concept and project. Anyway... here's here profile information: Sandy is a co-founder of NextAxiom and the co-inventor of NextAxiom's seven patent-pending innovations. She has managed all aspects of the hyperService Platform. To stay current with customer needs, and help drive product roadmap decisions, Sandy participates in projects and workshops with NextAxiom customers. Prior to NextAxiom, Sandy served as Product Manager for PeopleSoft's Optimization Applications. She led an elite team of PhD's responsible for delivering PeopleSoft's Advanced Supply Chain Planning and Optimization products. Prior to that, Sandy held positions as Principal Usability Architect and Senior Optimization Engineer for PeopleSoft. As Senior Supply Chain Consultant for Red Pepper Software, she led supply chain and integration workshops for companies such as Pepsi, Bausch & Lomb, HP, Analog Devices, and 3Com. Sandy holds a B.A. in Neurobiology from the University of California at Berkeley. She has completed studies and research toward an M.S. in Computer Simulations And you can bet that I am proud that she sees the value in the concept! One of these days... down the road when the software needs expert work and there is a budget... if I cannot get NextAxiom, then I will have to settle for who they recommend. (Plus I am pretty good with code myself.)

Brian Houska

Jun 5, 2014
09:04

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Robert, An interesting energy-audit approach. My concern is the potential negative impact on socialization as an unintended consequence and how that could be exacerbated by targeted marketing. I don't think that derails the idea, but you might address it. How would you implement your plan so that it enhanced the viability of urban neighborhoods? And how would you serve rural areas served equitably -- or would you not? If not, what incentives follow, and how are people likely to follow those incentives?

Brian Houska

Jun 5, 2014
09:04

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Vitality, not viability. My bad.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 5, 2014
10:17

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Hi Brian, Thanks for reading and commenting. I agree that there will be social changes as a result of this innovation, and I cannot say with certainty what all they will be. But I know that some of them will be very good, and I'm sure that some will be less than desirable. I'll work an answer to your question into a proposal revision soon, instead of trying to tackle it here. I will say, in answer to your question about how will rural areas be affected... has containerized freight changed you life? It has mine. Even though no container has ever been delivered to my door. Rural areas will go from low availability of goods, to not as low. City areas will go from high availability, to very high. The improvements in distribution will be in proportion to how thorough the distribution already is. I hope that answers at least some of your query. Thanks again for asking. -Robert

Michael Hertel

Jun 6, 2014
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This reminds me a time 40+ years ago when milk was delivered to your house by the milkman. It is certainly possible that something like this could be done now if you had a drop box where the things to be delivered where placed which was close to your house. I had a door in the wall of the house into which the milk and butter were placed and it would stay cold in there for a while.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 6, 2014
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Hi Michael, Thanks for reading and commenting. The delivery of milk was changed circa 1944 by Carl Lindner, Jr., of Ohio. His family started United Dairy Farmers, and the chain still has about 200 stores. At that time, four quarts of milk delivered was 58 cents. He introduced "cash and carry" bottled milk from his dairy, open seven days a week from 7 am to 9 pm. He also introduced the gallon and half gallon package. One gallon was 29 cents. Two milkmen accosted Mr. Lindner at closing, the first day of his new business, but he prevailed. There are some shared box models going on in Europe. These are like those lockers that used to take a quarter to release the key. Now with electronics, a delivery person (or system), could put your parcel into the next available box, then send you notice of which box and crypto-key to open it, via email or smart phone. Receiving boxes could be insulated, heated, refridgerated, or frozen. I am looking forward to completing development of the entire concept, and there is a lot of potential. Thanks again, -Robert

Joseph Fortescue

Jun 6, 2014
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Rob, This could go many different ways. I'm on-board with the concept, but have concerns about social acceptance, cost, right of way, convenience (I'm assuming not everyone will have a terminus at their front door) This is definitely something the warrants further discussion. Joe

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 6, 2014
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Joe, Thanks for reading and commenting. I think you are spot on about all of the hurdles remaining. On social acceptance... its ease of use, energy efficiency, and low cost should carry the day. On right of way... all fifty states in the US have laws on the books that allow public utilities to share the right of way of all roads. This is what allows the private telephone and cable companies to run their networks. Many natural gas companies are private, too. About serving everyone at home... of all 115 million households right now in the US, only 99% are on the electric grid, 85% on municipal water, 75% on community sewer, and about 60% have natural gas. CargoFish Physical Internet will work in areas having the population density to support it. Rural areas will find that the local general store on the network, will be almost the only place they need to shop at, because it will be able to provide a variety of hundreds of thousands of everyday and/or exotic items, on very short notice compared to any means in service today. I love it, I don't mind saying so, and I can give you every reason to love it, too! Thanks for your comments! Robert DeDomenico

Mark Johnson

Jun 7, 2014
12:48

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Wow Robert! First time here, first time studying your stellar project. You are a figurative "David" with current obstacles/counter arguments representing "Goliath." We must remember,very well known Titan IT CEOs stared in their garages. We must also remember early city planners didn't have to worry about easements, water/gas/electrical lines, licensing, etc. But look at the great ideas coming from this CoLab. I like the "pilot local grocery store" idea above, Chad's comments, captd's 12 points and others. Because of the critical importance distribution/supply chain software will play in the success of your project, I potentially see the project title becoming: "CargoFish - The Global Physical/Logical Internet." Like DoD's Global Information Grid (GIG), CargoFish (CF) becomes this huge "Capilary-to-Artery-to-Backbone" Enterprise Architecture (EA), where software and SQL servers produce the right Business Analytics (BA) and Business Intelligence (BI) to optimize the network. Regional CF Distribution Hubs (many more than existing UPS, FedEx hubs) will use Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and much more to craft a cybersecurity solution to ensure data confidentiality, integrity, availability, access, authorization, and nonrepudiation - since data and its protection will be key for CargoFish success. Again, I liked captd's 12 points and your responses. I will soon work at a Federal regulatory commission dealing with power distribution and I can see where the right mix of policy people on this project could craft a "compelling" business model to perhaps create a public-private endevour? Pie in the sky many will say, but we have to start somewhere. A few "visuals" as they might relate to CF: 1. Real estate developers know "high rises" increase their profit/sq ft. given each building's physical footprint. Similarly, CF distribution networks use small footprints on existing highly traveled areas and are raised above roadways and use innovative connectivity solutions - sort of like public glass walkways above the busy streets and between Highrises in NYC or MPLS (sort of like fiber optic people movers). 2. Drive-thru banks use "deposit capsules" and vaccuum/forced air tubes to send the deposit slips from the vehicle to bank teller - e.g., Regional CF Hubs pass product to Local Community CF Hubs which support direct delivery to subscribing customers on the physical/logical CF neighborhood network - like the grocery store LAN idea above. 3. We seek Big Data partnerships with "venture capitalists" who take a stake in your upcoming IPO! For example, FedEx, UPS, Department of Transportation databases are mined to define: The True Logistics Enterprise today - e.g., the nominal, ordinal, interval and ratio scaled FACTS regarding just what is being moved around the country and what trends are evident today. 4. Knowning #3 above, and knowing regulatory obstacles expected (environment, easements, licensing, etc.) we may say: "CargoFish's best approach is to determine which States, munincipalities, laws, statutes, and sources of capital exist are CF Friendly." You've gone beyond an A+ for effort, presenting a well conceived vision framework based on existing government and (comparative) empirical cost-benefit/energy/distance data. Your many years of research show Robert - from sharing the challenges (with later benefits) of other big ideas like building America's railroad network. Well founded perspectives. Look forward to learning more. Thanks for your service too Shipmate. I'm a Navy Vet too and just to let everyone know who's posting here, the most intelligent, most highly trained personel in the Navy are Nuclear Trained enlisted and officers. So with me shipmate, you have instant credibility! Within all enlisted rates, the nuclear trained Electronic Technician (ET) may be the most highly trained. If interested, I have a Navy friend who is a Robotics SME - he could play a big part in container packaging, as one example. Finally, there is another project on this site dealing with electromagnetic energy which may relate to CF. Japan's magnetic leverage (MAGLEV) train technology can move tons of train mass to speeds of about 350 mph using "magnetic flux/electromagnetic energy" which vevitates and "pushes" the train along two "coiled" tracks. Google "Japan MagLev train." Very interesting. Imagine CargoFish 5-lbs packages going great distances via MagLev. I toured FedEx's Memphis TN night shift operations. I saw all those DC-10 landing lights stacked out about 20 miles.....every package comes to Memphis and is then flown to FedEx Hubs the next day. Imagine a CargoFish network with CF Hubs intelligently placed to optimize its "one-way delivery model." While others will say many unknowns here, Keep Charging Ahead Robert! Thanks for your earlier email. We are here to help. I see Chad's Hempcrete ideas complementary (sorting out PVC alternatives etc.) e.g., CF hub physical infrastructure at hub locations.

Michael Hayes

Jun 7, 2014
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Thanks for drawing my attention to the concept. I would like to see the energy usage be committed to carbon negative biofuels. Also, using HDPE culverts as pneumatic/vacuum tube transport arteries is an idea I've played with for some time. There are a number of old railroad right of ways which have been turned over local governments as a way to maintain the land rights for future use. Running HDPE culverts under/on/above these legacy railroad lands needs to be explored. Best regards,

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 7, 2014
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First, Mark, Thank you for being so generous with your time in reading and evaluating my proposal, and investing even so much more in such a detailed response. I am elated to hear that you see the potential in the concept, and I greatly appreciate your appraisal of my efforts. It is so interesting how you focused in on the Navy training. I owe a great deal to the care with which all of those excellent courses were constructed: Basic Electricity and Electronics Training, Electronics Technician "A" School, Electronics Technician Maintenance School, and of course Naval Nuclear Power School and Prototype. I like to think of this entire project as just another exercise in troubleshooting to the component level. The (most) failed component in transportation is the routine use of cars and light trucks for payloads so small they could be handled by a physical internet utility. The returns from correcting this problem can be put toward expanding this solution in several ways already foreseen, and perhaps more not yet envisioned. I just hope that this proposal gets advanced. I do apologize that there are many technical details that I have not shared here... yet. I am working on shoring up some IP work so that I can do that, hopefully before the deadline for proposal revisions. Anyway... thank you many times over for your comments. I look forward to making this project worthy of such support. Sincerely, Robert DeDomenico

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 7, 2014
09:33

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Hi Michael, Thanks for responding, and supporting! I should explain though, that this technology is not at all pneumatic, due to several characteristic drawbacks of trying to employ pneumatics on such a scale of distance and network complexity. There are many network pneumatic tube systems, such as the 2,000 or so Swisslog Translogic systems in hospitals across North America, with another 600 hospitals operating Pevco systems. There are, and have been, many other installations, including pneumatic post systems in London, Philadlphia, Boston, St. Louis, Chicago, New York, Paris, and many other cities throughout Germany, Italy, and Austria. Several of these had remained in service to dates such as 1952, 1972, and 2002. While there are good reasons that all have been retired... none of those reasons hold against the new technology I have developed. I should be in a position to provide more details in the proposal in the coming weeks. Thanks again, Robert

Mike Brodzik

Jun 8, 2014
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Rob, Your vision is compelling. It's understandable that it's difficult for many to grasp at first because it breaks established patterns so completely. True innovation always requires users to reorganize their habits along with their perspective on the world. The breakthrough will come when that first grocery store, warehouse or factory adopts the model. Others will quickly see the potential. Keep up the great work! I look forward to the day when my opportunities for productivity and leisure have been significantly expanded because the current social, economic and personal patterns of wasting time and energy to complete most mundane shopping errands have been eliminated. Dr. Michael Brodzik

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 8, 2014
09:49

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Mike Brodzik, and family, are neighbors and friends to my family. He has seen the years of testing and development unfold on the roads of our little neighborhood. He has heard, though he never said so out loud, all about the project certainly more times than anybody should have to. Often times while driving home, I would see Mike walking the dog. Then, completely oblivious to the fact that Mike was already engaged in conversation on his iPhone, probably for work, I would rush into the garage and grab the latest incarnation of the vehicle or track, and run out to show him. Mike... more than thanks for your support... thanks for putting up with me and my incessant project. It is no wonder at all that you are a leader in education, where it matters most how you treat people.

Helia Sohrabi

Jun 8, 2014
04:50

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I have met Mr Dedomenico at first International Physical Internet conference; I find his idea brilliant and hope that he receives enough acceptance, motivation and fund to help the movement towards a sustainable transportation system. Best of Luck dear Robert Helia

Per Ahlstrom

Jun 8, 2014
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I can't find a description of the technology that will be used. I understand the propulsion will be by electricity, but will the vehicles have wheels or is it maglev? What kind of control system will be used? Central control or distributed? What are the speeds? What is the capacity? If it is too expensive in this country to bury electrical cables, in spite of the high costs for blackouts, why would people want to pay for buried pipes? What will the load profile be able to handle? Up to shopping bag size? How about odd shapes? For this to become more than an idea the description has to be more detailed and technical. And it is completely unnecessary to waste space on listing who have turned the project down.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 8, 2014
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Helia, Monmoon! And please reiterate to Dr. Montreuil how grateful I am to him for convincing me to make the investment in attending the conference. It would have been a huge mistake to miss it. I feel that just experiencing such a close, inside look, and the Physical Internet Initiative was worth it, not to mention making the acquaintance of so many individuals working so hard in the field to implement meaningful improvement. Merci beaucoup, Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 8, 2014
08:07

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Hi Per, I did not get too descriptive in the technology, true. That does not mean it is no more than an idea though. I was just taking the time to show the prototype to my first recruit into the technology department... an young engineer attending a local school. His name is Patrick. He got to see all the technical details, and a demonstration, and he loved them. Even though it is too expensive to bury every power cable, your country buries pipes already. Do you not have water, sewer, or natural gas? None of the customers will pay for these buried lines up front. They will pay for the service though, as they use it. It will be cheaper than using their cars, and more convenient, which is why they will pay for it. The load profile will be able to handle many more things than it cannot handle, and what it cannot handle, it won't handle. Do water pipes deliver orange juice? No. Does that mean they are useless? No. They are useful for what they are designed for, and that is enough. This is no different. If you see any value in the concept, you could follow some of the references and find at least some of the technical details you are wondering about. What you are really wondering though is if it will work. It works. Patrick could tell you that much now. As soon as the IP is secured... I will explain exactly how. I hope that I have addressed at least some of your concerns though. Thank for bringing them up, Robert

Fliss Roberts

Jun 8, 2014
09:54

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Hi Robert, Love the concept and thanks for inviting me to read. Thoughts - could the system you are proposing tack on to standard infrastructure already available throughout most of the "developed" world, therefore making it more viable and attractive to potential partners? I'm thinking specifically, the telegraph poles used to connect power lines down every street. You have probably already considered this but would love to know your thoughts. I have images of human powered cable cars on a pulley system delivering my groceries! :) Fliss

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 8, 2014
09:11

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Hi Fliss, Thanks for reading, and asking questions. I cannot begin to tell you how closely I have examined the overhead telephone and power infrastructure... nor how many times! The NYC pneumatic post system was primarily underground, but actually spanned the Brooklyn Bridge! That was the most challenging part of the system, due to the greater range of temperatures. I like underground a lot for the temperature stability, as well as a bit of "security by obscurity"! When it must go above ground though... it will. Mind you though, it's actually just motor driven traction, not cable car. I went through the pros and cons of many different technologies and configurations. I've studied every conveyor belt system in the world longer than 5 miles! (Including the ~60 mile, 11 flight, phosphate conveyor in Buu Cra, Africa!) This I expect to dovetail in with existing methods of transport at first, but ultimately I see products coming right off the assembly line into this system, without having to case them up, then pallet up those cases, only to break down those pallets to make mixed pallets, then finally break down those pallets and cases to shelve the goods, where they are still of no real value to anybody because they are not home where they get used. I love that you like it! Thanks again for reading! It makes the work getting it this far feel worth it. Sincerely, Robert

Jake Campbell

Jun 9, 2014
02:35

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This is sorely needed to start bringing down the costs of fuel and wear and tear on our highways and bridges. I am firmly behind this proposal Robert!

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 9, 2014
02:48

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Thank you for saying so, Jack! I have, and continue to, put a lot of work into this. Every little bit of help and/or support is greatly appreciated! Sincerely, Robert

Patrick Martin

Jun 9, 2014
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This is patrick, I am currently a mechanical engineering undergraduate at rutgers university,just want to confirm something robert said. I have seen the prototype first hand, and it is very rudimentary (this is expected of a prototype anyway). But it has me convinced that it or a later version of it, would be capeable of achieving what the description claims. Robert has put in four years of effort into this project, and as a result nearly every thing that could be considered, seems to have been. At least as far as I could tell, many technical (mechanical and electrical) hurdles have been overcome, with much inovation involved. The main limmiting factor for this project is funding. If anyone has any questions for me specifically, send me a pm.

Delton Chen

Jun 9, 2014
11:57

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Hello, I offered to comment in previous messages. Whilst I have not studied the details, I believe I get the gist. Using the CargoFish branding name was a very smart move. I think the name is good. My contribution, as a short first-impression reviewer, is to list a few things that I find appealing, and what sub-topics might be worth a strategic analysis. GOOD - firstly, if your technological ideas are very good, you may wish to find a commercial partner to develop a patent. The energy savings, it seems practical especially for densely populated urban areas and industrial zones. I would consider checking feasibility in a large building, such as a factory, industrial park, airport or supermarket. There are companies that deal with conveyers - as you're probably aware. GOOD - I suggest that you find a contact in Google, if they are still investing in driverless cars. I am not sure of the synergy, but they may have some software solutions for the navigation. If each unit was autonomous, then the Google software would be able to drive your units to/from destination points. Being guided, on tracks/tunnels, would be much easier that free-range driving, If your small vehicles could do both, then there is scope for some amazing transportation options. I think makes more sense than the diver-less car concept. MORE - To be honest , I did not read everything in detail. If you haven't covered these topics, have a think. Politics (?); Economics (ok); Physical (ok); Ethics (ok); Social (?). Perhaps consider the social implications - good/bad. I guess that people like the idea of driving to the shop because it gives them a few hours out of the house ....its not just about milk and bread. So think about what people can do with their extra time, extra saved money, and what will they do instead? BAD - Corporate retail and service providers like people in their shops so that can sell more. Perhaps you (invite me after the CoLab comp ends) could have a think about how retailer/services can enjoy customers in their shops and also save energy on transport... I don't have the answer for that just yet, but I think there is always a way... GOOD - Something about CargoFish feels right...at first it felt a bit oddball. Maybe just that its 20 years ahead of its time. Best regards Delton Chen

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 10, 2014
07:18

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Hi Delton, Thanks for the vote of support! And for the comments! Oh yes... I would like to get the patent work completed. I have a family, and my oldest will be a senior in high school this fall. I want to provide for them. It is also necessary that when investment finally arives, there will be returns on those moneys. It is not all about simply taking as much as possible... to the contrary, the best way for me to get anything is to deliver as much as possible... to provide something valuable for others. I know that you were not at all complaining about any profit motive, but I know that people are sensitive to that. I am too. I have ethics, and I intend to exercise them. Conveyors... they are such an interesting topic. One of my favorites is a unit somewhere in the copper mines of South America, which has its origin at about 10,000 ft elevation, at the mine mouth, moves ore at several tons per hour down to the smelter 8 miles away at about 5,000 ft elevation, and generates a net 25 MW electrical output in the process! Love it! I have been trying to contact Google, Amazon, etc., to no avail. Hopefully one of these contests one day will may lead to a level of interest from them that is at least slightly better than zero. This is just the way it is. How does anybody know, that among the sea of people knocking at their door, any one in particular is worth listening too? About all of the impacts... how are these side effects any different from this technology than from any of the other revolutionary things that have come to pass? It is not entirely predictable what people will do with the extra time they have, but they will have it. I know that they will not be driving as often for the purpose of picking up ______ (fill in the blank,) or dropping off the same, and that is a good thing. They can always still do so... but most of the time they won't. Nobody travels to retrieve their water, do they? And yet, in antiquity, the morning trip to the well was a social ritual as well as a necessity. There are stories of how women who had fallen out of favor in society would routinely wait until afternoon to visit the well, so as not to have to face the rest of society there. About brick and morter stores... this is just too bad. E commerce has been gaining ground, and this will accelerate the trend. What can be done about it? Nothing. Once the Wright Brothers built a plane and showed the world, who could have stopped flying? Thanks for voicing the overall assessment, and thanks for the good wishes. I will do my best not to let you, or anybody, down. Sincerely, Robert DeDomenico

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 10, 2014
08:02

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Sorry Delton, I answered several things, but really neglected the store model question. Here's how that will likely go... Stores will become less specialized, because any store on the network will see the minimum economical order quantity plumet, allowing them to make avaialable more variety, on shorter notice. So out in the country... the general store will return. There are so many ways that this affords change... it is almost daunting to think of them all. The key thing to keep in mind though, is that the superior economics, driven by the drastic reduction in wasted energy and human effort, will drive universal adoption. The rest of the cards will fall where they may, and who knows what ingenious ways will be thought of to leverage the new "physical internet". -Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 11, 2014
08:23

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All, It's been almost 24 hours since the last action on this concept (other than making up a name for the team,) and I have a few thought... How many of you remember the copper mining cave in in Chile a few years back? There were around 30 or more miners trapped about 1/2 mile below the surface due to a cave in of the main, spiral, access tunnel. This main tunnel was large enough to drive diesel trucks through. The trapped miners were found, and subsequently supplied for more than a month, by drilling a 5-1/4" vertical bore down to them from the surface. The emergency drillers withdrew the bit, and found a note attached to it! It was miraculous! Everything they needed to survive was passed down that bore. They couldn't get odd shapes, but did that matter? So we have our current transportation system. Last week, a Walmart truck rear ended a limousine, killing one and critically wounding at least two others, including Tracy Morgan, a comedian famous in part for numerous appearances on the popular and long running late night comedy TV show, "Saturday Night". A few months back, sometime in February 2014, an eight month pregnanat mother to be was killed while loading groceries into the back of the family minivan in the parking lot of a grocery store in NYC, because the driver of a small snowplow accidentally backed up into her. We see that there are problems with our transportation system. What is wrong with implementing some improvements? We fear that the entire system is subject to some vulnerabilities serious enough that we worry about potential catestrophic side effects or collapse, such as climate change, more wars, or worse... sudden undersupply of the primary source of transportation energy. Should we wait until these problems maifest themselves in ever more obvious forms? I am not advocating that we do something... just anything. I am proposing a specific remedy. I understand that it is not a complete one... what remedy is? I think it is a substantial one. I have coined a term, "kinesulation", from 'kinetic' + 'insulation'. I entered it into wiktionary, but the entry has since been deleted. What a shame. I think it is a useful term, that could help people grasp the big picture on dealing with transportation. I defined it essentially as any of the various means by which we attempt to allow a body in motion to stay in motion. We do what we can to reduce the parasitic forces acting to rob that body of its kinetic energy. The various means of this (allow me here, please,) kinesulation include: wheels, water transport, load aggregation, streamlining, etc. These means, used independently or in combination, act to reduce the energy necessary to keep a body in motion, in the real world we live in, near the surface of the Earth. CargoFish Physical Internet employs primarily the kinesulation of high capacity utilization factor. This is the same kinesulation that the Physical Internet Initiative, begun by Dr. Benoit Montreuil of Laval University in 2006, is working to improve. The only way to max out capacity utilization factor is to operate the means of conveyance only from source to destination, and then only fully loaded. Among the currently employed means of surface land transportation, the one most closely acheiving this is the pipeline. CargoFish is a pipeline for parcels. If you have any thoughts on this little soliloquy, I would love to hear them... good, bad, or indifferent. As always, thanks for reading, Robert

Richard Powell

Jun 11, 2014
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Anyone who lives in a 'moderate snow' area (like Cincinnati) will understand what kind of LIFE CHANGING technology this could be. Here are 3 scenerios that either myself, or personal friends of mine, have seen as possible LIFE CHANGING situations if CargoFish was available today: 1. the white death is heading for cincinnati (OMG IT"S GOING TO SNOW). you order up (on line) your Emergency French Toast supplies (bread, milk, eggs). from the local (major retailer located 4 miles away), pay for it, and 20 minutes later, without having to get in your car and suffer the white death, a little robot, running on a network of rails, comes to your house, and presents you with the aforementioned Emergency French Toast supplies... everyone wins!!! 2. a local gardener, is growing eggplant. and has more eggplants ready for the taking than he can handle. you, getting ready to make dinner, find a wonderful recipe for eggplant and bacon sandwiches. you have the bacon. you don't have the eggplant. you can a) get in your car, drive to the store, and hope a lot, or b) you can get on the local 'farmers market' website, search for eggplants, see that someone about 4 miles from you has 5 of them ready to ship via CargoFish,,, you buy them, 20 minutes later, just in time (because now the bacon is ready), the eggplants show up, dinner is saved!!!! without having to fire up the jalopy! 3. (sent to me by a friend who is blind, without edits) Yeah, and this would solve a perpetual problem for blind folks who go shopping: 3) You ned something. Milk. Frozen chicken tenders. Mrs. Smith’s apple pie. Get it delivered, because, well, having it shipped from some online place would cost a fortune. And taking a walk to the grocery, or better yet, taking a taxi or bus, getting to the service desk, having someone assigned to help you who can barely read English, walk through the store with them, and hear the four most dreaded words in the English language: “We ain’t got that”. When in reality, the person assigned to be of assistance isn’t, can’t read labels, and can’t be bothered to use the eye God stuck in their head. Yeah, ya think I maybe have had this problem before? I for one, wish this was available TODAY. Thank you Robert! All the Best. /rick

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 12, 2014
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Chief, Thanks! Again! You have been onboard, all ahead flank, in supporting me in this endeavor at every instance where there has been any opportunity to help, every time! I know I don't have to tell you that I am going to see this through... you've heard me talk about hang gliding! (No need to ask if you remember that, is there? LOL!) This project, this innovation, this revolution to be... will be my legacy. It is the kind of thing that I did dream of when I was just a little kid, reading the encyclopedia... (for fun!) None of it will come to be on account of me alone though. At the end of the day, I will only have a share in the credit for making it all happen. It takes people like you, and Cdr. Erik P. Voogd, and all of the other supporters who have repeatedly shouted out loud, as much as their circumstances allow, that this concept is worth implementing. It is no small task to contribute your personal time, your TIME, to helping, even if some might say, "Oh, that only took a minute." I think we can all agree how hard it can be to spare a minute for anything other than the many jobs we all seek to complete on any given day. So again... thank you. That goes for all of you who have supported me, whether in here with a vote, and/or a comment, or elsewhere. I appreciate it. -DeDo

Galen Wilkerson

Jun 12, 2014
10:19

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Hi! Again, answer this question: "What is it?" as briefly as possible in the pitch and intro. Right now, that is still not clear. Again, do not ask a question, give an answer. That's all I can do now. best, G

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 12, 2014
10:48

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It is the future of transportation.

Bernice Dedomenico

Jun 13, 2014
02:57

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Robert, I think this is a good thing you are trying to do for the world, and I hope it all works out well for you, too. Love, Mom

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 13, 2014
02:39

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Mom!!! ...just kidding! - THANKS!

Agharese Lucia Ojelede

Jun 14, 2014
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Hello Robert, You have a very interesting proposal generating a lot of comments. This concept will take a lot of getting used to therefore will generate a lot of comments so you need to continually make the concept clearer for more understanding and acceptance by the general public. I wish you the best this time. Arese

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 14, 2014
09:17

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Hi Arese, Thanks! I've been very busy with many aspect of this project, and do intend to revisit the proposal within the next few weeks to tighten up a couple of aspects. It really is a case of simply not revealing all that there is to reveal, and not of having the concept only half baked! I have some very interesting irons in the fire to attend to right now though, so my apologies for the wait. Thanks again! Sincerely, Robert

Utathya Roy

Jun 16, 2014
09:10

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Awesome idea. Life is gonna be easy with this implemented. Time and Money will become available for more productive works. I wish you the very best of luck.

Sowmya Akella

Jun 16, 2014
02:16

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Hello Robert, Concept wise its great and might work too in large cities in the USA or rather developed countries. I say this because what I have heard is that the distance of a local supermarket from a home is a lot,say about 10 miles or so which certainly isn't walking distance and the person is forced to use a car. Even assuming someone gets there by bicycle, because of the distance he/she buys in bulk for which carrying the heavy stuff is a problem making it a clear case of car use .If one misses an ingredient of a recipe(say), one HAS to drive all the way back. However in a country like India we have a large network of mom and pop stores which are these small stores keeping basic essentials like water, some soap, some snacks, say first aid, glue, few basic vegetables,posts, stamps, courier service etc. in every other street corner. I walk to get my groceries, firstly because its very close by and also I don't have to carry a lot. This is because I stock lesser at home due to a store being nearer.I'd rather have the store keeping inventory rather than me keeping it at home. I believe this is a simpler solution in a developing country rather than investing money in building a goods transport network again. Nevertheless as I said earlier it suits the USA setup.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 16, 2014
02:35

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Thank you again, Sowmya, for your support and your comments. Yes, I have often thought that the actual best case use would be in US suburban areas, where nobody is close enough to any store to walk for anything. In a city, it might be competing with just walking to a nearby store, in which case that leg of the journey may not provide a return on investment for all of this installation. But... in the city I do like this for supplying all of those small stores! They would be able to provide you with a much wider selection of goods then. In the end, I just see so many ways that this offers to reduce car and truck traffic, while also providing greater convenience. I am certainly happy that you see some potential as well. Sincerely, Robert

Tapesh Mishra

Jun 17, 2014
07:15

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Hello Robert, I really like the concept of physical internet. I also admire your dedication to the idea. However, I believe it's more important to optimize the delivery route than the delivery vehicle itself. Can you please elaborate in your plan, how will you create the required infrastructure and what will be the net savings (GHG emissions) considering complete LCA? Also, how well this concept stands in contrast to use of drones for delivery (which might be the future of small package delivery). Thanks, Tapesh

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 17, 2014
09:14

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Hi Tapesh, The delivery 'route' will be optimized by being made primarily of a product produced from ethane, and it will provide extreme energy savings for decades in this capacity, as opposed to separating out ethane only to burn it as fuel, which would actually be more consumption of energy instead of delivering any savings. The infrastructure will be created the same as several other standard utility infrastructures already are, with only minor differences in methods and cost, as alluded to in the proposal, expounded upon in several of the references, and essentially attested to by Patrick, the new engineer on the team. Buildings all over the world already undergo the expenses of being outfitted with plumbing and wiring, and serviced by water, sewer, gas and electric. Some of the earlier comments also have touched on this. The net savings of green house gas emissions considering complete life cycle are very easy for anybody to get an order of magnitude handle on, by simply considering how much extra fuel would have to be consumed if we were to suddenly stop using existing utilities such as municipal water and sewer, and instead drive and truck in all of the water that we consume every day in our homes, and also drive the waste away for disposal. The comparison to drones is already given in comment number two, above. Helicopter drones have no chance of being the future of small package delivery, for the reasons provided there. If anything has been left unanswered, don't hesitate to say so. I appreciate the time you took to read and comment, thanks! Robert

Michael Brown

Jun 18, 2014
01:26

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This is a very interesting idea and you are spot-on with your recognition of the absurdity of driving a car to get bread from the grocery store. There have been lots of good comments above, but I have two specific suggestions for this proposal: 1) Consider identifying in greater detail where you would implement the pilot project. Density is going to be very important here, so a downtown core area with lots of high-rise apartment buildings would be a good place to start. 2) I recommend 'tightening up' the proposal a little bit. The 'Pitch', for example, isn't really a pitch but is more of an introduction. Don't use question marks either; try to distill the essence of the proposal into one or two assertive sentences. As well, it gets a little off-topic, for example the analogy of the earth as a mansion which I did not understand in relation to this specific proposal. I think you can probably eliminate about a third to a half of the words in this proposal without losing any details, and in the process make it much easier to comprehend. Good luck with this contest and with your work on this initiative! This could be a real game-changer within the transportation industry. Best, Mike

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 18, 2014
06:28

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Hi Mike, Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, I appreciate it. I'll see what I can do about expanding the explanation on the pilot project. The difficulty with that is, there are so many, many places suitable for a pilot, and it costs money. So, the actual pilot will depend greatly on the will of the individual(s) putting up the money. I have done numerous comparative analysis with other utilities, their costs and customer per linear mile of network densities. It is as you said, attractive for use in high density urban areas, especially apartment buildings, and that may very well be the best place to start. As for the pitch... based on response received so far, I think I will leave the headlines of the proposal alone. The title itself actually explains a lot, and the questions are exactly what I want people to ponder. If anybody is so antagonistic as to not read further because of that, then there is little chance of convincing them of anything, regardless how true it is. Einstein himself once said, "Great spirits have always been violently opposed by mediocre minds." I'll see if I can work in the mansion analogy a little better. I don't want to lose it, because it is important to point out that the best strategy is to pick the low hanging fruit first. There are many schemes pushed around the world that claim to make sense and/or provide benefit, that actually do not. It takes too much work, more than many people have time for, to analyse well enough to uncover the truth. As a result, many things undeserving of public funds are nonetheless lavishly supported. Even if everything currently supported were deserving, it should be possible to arrange the priorities, and that sorting should put the most valuable efforts at the top. That is why I have invested so much of my own time, effot, and money. There is an initiative known as "The Physical Internet Intititive", that compliments well with CargoFish, (or vice versa), and has many good people working hard to make significant improvments. I will also see what opportunities I can sieze upon to tighten up the word count of the proposal overall. (I am a big fan of the brevity of the Gettysburg Address!) Thank you for the words of encouragement. With continued effort, and the emerging help of others coming on board, I believe the effort is withing months of going mainstream. Sincerely, Robert

Angélica Lara P.r.

Jun 19, 2014
11:13

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Hi Robert, Thank you for your submission, I realize you have a lot of comments and suggestions. For me it´s a good idea, maybe people will need time to get use this type of transportation. I just have a question... where you're planning to implement the pilot project? Regards and good luck!

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 19, 2014
11:29

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Dear Angelica, Thank you for taking the time to read, for your vote of support, and for your question. My plan for the pilot implmentation, if it must be within my own personal means, is to build a portable system that I can set up and also take apart and set up elsewhere, for demonstration. So this type of pilot would not be underground, and would be for validation and any necessary development adjustments. The first pilot of an actually installed system for long term use will depend very much on the decision of the person(s) putting up the money. It could be a new suburban development in the US, so that those homewowners are not operating cars just to retrieve groceries, etc. It could be an industrial complex, for moving parts from the storeroom to the shops, etc. It could be in a city, to connect a few high rise apartment buildings to goods, etc. There are as many places for this to start as there were for cars themselves. I see it as universally applicable, just like the other utilities: water, sewer, gas, electric, telephone, and Internet. I will be taking the time to refine the proposal iteself over the coming weeks, just to make it more readable. Thanks again, Robert

Don Piper

Jun 20, 2014
02:30

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Robert - Thanks for requesting my input. This is not really my area of expertise, however I'm intrigued by the concept.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 20, 2014
03:24

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Don, Thanks for looking it over! I am sure what intrigues you is the truth of the central theme. CargoFish's primary lever of advantage is simply matching the transportation system to the load. Using a car to move so many everrday items, is like using a tractor trailer to move a single barrel of oil at a time. The technical details of how best to accomplish this are really too much to get across in this proposal anyway, so if you have any questions, feel free to use the contact form from my website, www.cargofish.com. Sincerely, Robert

Patricia Hickman

Jun 20, 2014
03:38

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Robert,, has been working on this very hard, I talk to Robert several times since he start his idea. He has worked on tweaking it and has put a lot of time and effort into it, because he has a lot faith that this could be reality and economical for everyone.

Shailendra K Mistry

Jun 21, 2014
03:36

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Dear sir, good idea. kind regards,

Tom Morris

Jun 23, 2014
11:37

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The concept is interesting. my main concern would be security. what would prevent a customer from placing a bomb on a vehicle?

Meredith Herr

Jun 23, 2014
06:36

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CargoFish's capillary gage system is intriguing and could be an energy efficient solution to car-dependent transport as long as the initial infrastructure development and maintenance has a low carbon impact. I imagine that in order for people to shift their behavior, a new system like CargoFish will need to be benefit the consumer through ease of use and fiscal savings.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 23, 2014
08:55

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Hi Meredith, Thank you for taking the time to read and comment on my proposal. I am happy that you and Cara found it thought provoking. The most inefficient transportation in service today, is the use of private cars and light trucks for the transport of small, personal payloads. Because of this, the greatest gain in fuel efficiency can be made here, and it does also offer greater convenience for the consumer, as well as less handling and overhead for the vendor. These characteristics should allow economic improvement in addition to fuel and emission savings from its implementation. The initial infrastructure impact should be very similar to water, sewer, and gas systems, and should therefore result in net savings within about five years. People will embrace shifting their behavior, just as we now enjoy mechanized home heating, and few people know what it was like to tend the coal or wood stove. I have had the benefit of 4+ years of noodling on it, from all aspects, so my level of comfort with these conclusions may take a little for others to arrive at, but that is to be expected. I was in NYC today, and made further observations on human behavior. We all enjoy spending energy. There are tour buses, tour boats, tour helicopters, etc. I would much rather be in a position of offering more value for less energy, than imposing energy rationing at the expense of forfeited value. I think that is what makes CargoFish most appealing. Thanks again, Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 23, 2014
08:45

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Hi Tom, I didn't see your comment before replying to Meredith. What prevents a customer from placing a bomb in a mailbox now? Or in a sewer or storm drain? This system would actually offer ease of processing for screening of the incoming stream to any high risk target. This is already done with the US mail for many members of the federal government. The rest of us enjoy 'security by obscurity'. (Nobody is really gunning for us by name, because we are just another face in the crowd!) Good question, but no reason to reject this system over any system presently in service. Thanks! Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 23, 2014
08:17

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Oh, also, at least there would be a limit on the bomb size. The Federal Building in Oklahoma was destroyed by just one bomb, because it was hauled by a truck. Each CargoFish vehicle will hold up to only 16 lbs, which would not have brought down that building and killed 200 or so innocent victims. It was still a good question though. I am glad you brought it up! Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 23, 2014
09:02

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Oh, forgot about the thought that has also gone into the 'stations', which are essentially like appliances. When a person sends something over the Internet, unless sophisticated things are done to keep it anonymous, there are 'breadcrumbs' to follow. With CargoFish, each appliance made to accept a parcel for delivery, could easily employ computing to make the user enter credentials. This makes it much harder for a perpetrator to commit the crime. These and other security measures fall into the set of 'design options awaiting development'... a list that is not insignificant. If you still have any concerns that security could be a showstopper, don't hesitate to say so. Although I have tried to consider everything, something may have been missed. Thanks again, Robert

Sarah Lewe

Jun 24, 2014
12:01

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The concept is interesting

Fan Tastic

Jun 25, 2014
01:56

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My proposal: Super Human Intelligent Transport will require no physical movement at all. using the power of our minds we will travel to stores browse items and materialize them in our desired location thus nullifying the need for this subteranean habitrail you propose. I have sucessflly used my technique to produce pizza's sub sandwiches and various electronic devices.

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 25, 2014
01:35

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Good luck with that! Any more comments from the peanut gallery?

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 25, 2014
04:27

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While I am a firm believer that ideas should be judged not by their advocates, but by their merit, I am also a realist. We all seek clues to determine the credibility of information presented to us. With that in mind, and partially in response to comment number 85 from the peon, I have assembled a partial list of CargoFish supporters. Included are only those supporters having something filled in for their MIT Climate Colab profile biography, minus a few very close friends, associates, and relatives. The profiles listed span a wide range of professions and experience, and among those omitted are many other interesting, notable, and everyday careers and experiences, all of whom I am proud to have supporting CargoFish. I did not point out how exactly I know any of them, and many of them I had not known. Partial list of CargoFish Physical Internet supporters: ------ Dan Whittet: Mr. Whittet has been a part of the high performance building field as a contractor, designer, developer and consultant on work across the United States for over three decades. He has worked in Southwest Colorado and Maine on photovoltaic off grid projects pioneering sustainable net zero systems in remote island and mountain locations. Notable recent LEED projects include Boston's iconic International Place towers, Las Vegas CityCenter, Boston Society of Architects and the Princeton Plasma Fusion Lab Lyman Spitzer building. As a contractor Dan pioneered sustainable practices in Maine and also served as President of the Mid Coast branch of the National Homebuilders Association and a member of the Rockport, Maine town building committee. In Colorado he was part of the team creating the first Green Building Code for San Miguel County and produced a documentary on the evolution of community in small towns. Currently active in the Massachusetts USGBC and Member of the ASHRAE SSPC 189.1, he is also a board member of the ADPSR, Architects, Designers and Planners for Social responsibility. He is the LEED project profile liaison between USGBC national and the Massachusetts chapter. With his wife, Maria Isabel Chacon, he follows the progress of the green building movement in Latin America and Urban Planning initiatives in the rapidly expanding populations there. Passionate about craft, quality of life and culture he writes and blogs about these subjects often and takes every opportunity to explore new ways to see, appreciate and encourage a better world. ------ Carlos Gershenson I am a full time researcher, leader of the Self-organizing Systems Lab, and head of the Computer Sciences Department of the Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas (IIMAS) of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). I am also a researcher at the Centro de Ciencias de la Complejidad (C3) of the UNAM. I have a wide variety of academic interests, including self-organizing systems, complexity, artificial life, evolution, cognition, artificial societies, robotics, and philosophy. For more info, please visit http://turing.iimas.unam.mx/~cgg/ ------ Monika dos Santos I hold PhD in psychology and I am a senior lecturer in the Psychology Department at the University of South Africa. I am currently completing a second PhD in clinical psychology. On a personal level I have followed a vegan lifestyle for over 20 years. I hold an interest in how narcissistic traits in humans (be they conscious or unconsious) play out in adversly affecting our environments on a global level - and also how to activley deal with this problem in a tangible way, for example, through education and adaptation strategies, such as the provision of healthcare to affected vulnerable communities in Africa ------ Captain D You don't need a Weatherman to know which way the wind blows... Bob Dylan ------ Osero Shadrack Tengeya Am a Kenyatta University student pursuing my undergraduate studies in Environmental studies (Resource Conservation). ------ Alex Bracht Autodidact and Poliglot at the frontlines of the transformation ! ------ Michael Hayes Retired commercial fisherman with 4 years of independant studies concerning climate change mitigation ------ Helio Laubenheimer Helio Laubenheimer earned a Master’s Degree in Marine Science, Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Science and MBA in Entrepreneurship and New Business Development. Currently based in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, he has been involved for over 6 years with emission reduction projects and sustainability related issues, including environmental restoration & planning activities in the mining sector. ------ Angélica Lara P.R. Natural specialist interested in Environmental Politics, Sustainable Development & Climate change ------ Delton Chen My personal and professional aim is to make a significant contribution to solving the U.S. and World Carbon Price problem. My solution is to develop an innovative global economic policy that can circumvent social and political deadlocks and trigger the economic transition to a low-carbon future. I have used a combination of intuitive thinking and rational problem solving methods to arrive at what I believe is the missing link of economic policy on climate change. My preferred career direction is to cultivate customer and stakeholder relationships through the provision of services and education for mitigating climate change. EDUCATION Ph.D. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (1992-2000). University of Queensland, Australia. B.Eng (Hons). Dept. of Civil Engineering (1985-89). University of Queensland, Australia. AFFILIATIONS Center for Regenerative Community Solutions, New Jersey, United States (non-profit) Economists for Peace and Security EXPERIENCE My expertise is in the analysis and modelling of physical processes and economic optimisation, mostly related to sub-surface water flow and related environmental interactions. Including: (i) Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), (ii) open-pit and underground mine dewatering and water supply, (iii) regional water resources for agriculture and town supply, (iv) environmental impact assessments of mines, islands, wetlands, lakes, estuaries, rivers etc., (v) water flow in soil and vegetation, and (vi) coral reefs ------ Musyani Chewe I am Zambian, passionate about sustainable development and how I am interested in harnessing the collaborative effort of crowd-sourcing to help solve the most challenging issues and challenges within sustainable development ------ Tiron Laurentiu I'm a sport and nature lover because these 2 are the perfect match.I sometimes meditate to increase my awareness.I try to be a kind person and I prefer staying alone ------ Tyllor Parker I live in Michigan and enjoy the idea of contributing to the global discussion on the future of our society. ------ William Knauss After graduating from college (Sociology) I worked for about ten years in the tool and die industry in Detroit. After that I spent 25 years designing and building passive solar housing in the Southwest. In my old age most of my effort spent in in developing the distributed production of biochar in our homes.where we can use all of the excess heat that is produced for cooking, space heating and hot water. Throughout most of my life the issue has been how we could finance what needs to be done to be good stewards of creation, not the technology. Never has the financing issue been in such sharp focus as it now is with our man made climate issue now threatening our entire planet. ------ Natalie Rubio I am a student at the University of Colorado, Boulder pursuing a degree in Chemical & Biological Engineering and a minor in Business. I currently intern for New Harvest, a organization whose vision is to render factory farming obsolete through advances in science & technology. I believe eliminating intensive livestock farming is a immense and feasible step towards combating climate change, and I believe it is possible. I am currently spending the 2014 summer in Cork, Ireland to intern for Muufri, a biotechnology startup developing sustainable, animal-free dairy. ------ Sandy Zylka Sandy is a co-founder of NextAxiom and the co-inventor of NextAxiom's seven patent-pending innovations. She has managed all aspects of the hyperService Platform. To stay current with customer needs, and help drive product roadmap decisions, Sandy participates in projects and workshops with NextAxiom customers. Prior to NextAxiom, Sandy served as Product Manager for PeopleSoft's Optimization Applications. She led an elite team of PhD's responsible for delivering PeopleSoft's Advanced Supply Chain Planning and Optimization products. Prior to that, Sandy held positions as Principal Usability Architect and Senior Optimization Engineer for PeopleSoft. As Senior Supply Chain Consultant for Red Pepper Software, she led supply chain and integration workshops for companies such as Pepsi, Bausch & Lomb, HP, Analog Devices, and 3Com. Sandy holds a B.A. in Neurobiology from the University of California at Berkeley. She has completed studies and research toward an M.S. in Computer Simulations. ------ Helia Sohrabi Currently a Ph.D. candidate at Laval University (Quebec City/ Canada). My research is focused on sustainable distribution systems enabled by Physical Internet initiative. ------ Fliss Roberts Due to complete MBA specialising in Sustainability in the next 2 months, I am passionate about stakeholder engagement and fascinated by encouraging widespread behaviour changes to limit (and undo) our impact on this beautiful planet we are so lucky to steward. Currently working as a strategic partnerships intern for Terracycle New Zealand (a company committed to eliminating the idea of waste through recycling hard to recycle waste streams) I am also attempting to build a cob "Hobbit Holes" since live in the middle of the Waitakere Ranges and it feels rude not to. Moving towards a zero waste lifestyle I've started keeping chickens, goats, ducks and growing as much of my own food as possible. I believe that the way to change things is not to get bogged down by how seemingly large and wicked the problems are. Instead, do something. Whatever it might be that seems most relevant to you, personally, even if it seems so tiny as to be irrelevant. Who knows where that small action may end up leading you. Share your experiences...and watch the world change ------ Oculus Prime I am a sustainability professional ------ Leslie Whitcomb I am an educator and author, addressing issues of Effective Interpersonal Communication for Engineers, and designing educational structures that integrate Sensory based aspects of communication to support learning effectiveness. My husband is an MIT Alumni and taught Ocean Engineering at MIT from 1998 through 2000. He is currently department chair at the Naval Post Graduate Systems Engineering Department. ------ Richard Powell Born and raised in San Diego, California, Richard was married for 32 years to his high school sweetheart Judy. After enlisting in 1976, raising their two sons, Matthew and Aaron, at various naval installations around the country, Richard and Judy settled in the suburbs of Cincinnati after his retirement from the US Navy as a Chief Petty Officer in 1996. Richard enjoys all forms of auto racing, spending quiet time at his cabin in the woods outside Jackson, Ohio and playing with his granddaughter Kristine that his son Matthew graciously provided for his entertainment. Sadly Judy passed away in 2011. Richard has since moved to the outskirts of Atlanta to continue his pursuit of using technology to enhance the art of medicine, and married the former Holly Meyers, who showed Richard what his affliction is called; MAKER! ------ Justas Ingelevičius I’m architect, I’m keen on sustainable architecture, open source technologies, sharing culture. With young and energetic team we are developing open source 3D prototyping system “DiGiDone 3D” based on “Blender” 3D modeling software. I believe that tools for objects creation should be open source and available to everyone. Only with such open tools we can cultivate innovative ideas and built harmonious and sustainable environment. ------ Ambereen Alvi Avid researcher of environmental issues with specific focus on localization and bioremediation. I feel like education is free but is restricted by personal limitations of action. I have worked and volunteered for institutions like permaculture farms, the Forest Service and local city cooperatives with focus on sustainable development. ------ Pooran Rajanna Consulting Architect, Geek, Code for resilience finalist ------ Sowmya Akella I am an electrical engineer working in India. I co-founded a small company which provides solar power off-grid solutions. Climate and environment are a few topics I am really interested in and read a sizeable amount of articles on the internet. I strongly believe support and believe in the idea of Buddhist economics and of moderate consumption with a world economy run on reduced greed and increased contentment. This alone is enough in mitigating climate change. ------ Anton Chupilko Sustainability pioneer Russia, Russian Green Building pioneer (Rugbc Board member, Sochi Olympics official advisor for green building), leader IlikeGreen team, Member of the Board Russian Carbon Fund and Moscow President Club Board Member ------ Dan Didrick My name is Dan Didrick and I am the CEO of Didrick Medical Inc. I invented the X-Finger; the first functional prosthetic finger for partial and full finger amputees. ------ Anni Bricca non-profit founder ------ Patricia Hickman I am a 63 year old living in New Jersey. I have been in nuclear security for 27 years. i am married and have a daughter. ------ Ashely Daza Lehigh ChemE '15 undergrad. ------ aleksandra popova Student at Lehigh University. ------ Carl Bost Born: June 14, 1964 - New York City, NY Grew up in Imperial, Missouri Graduated Windsor High School - 1982 Attended Jefferson College - Two Year Certificate of Technology in Communications Electronics United States Navy Veteran - 1987-1993, Graduated Naval Nuclear Power School, Assigned to USS Archerfish (SSN-678) for 4-1/2 years Currently married with two teenage boys and living in Saint Louis, Missouri Work for AT&T (14 years) Currently training for 5th (official) marathon (Marine Corp Marathon, October 26 ------ James Clancy Manager working in Nuclear Power in numerous capacities. Graduated from Franklin & Marshall College and University of Southern California in Geological Sciences & Geochemistry. Live in Delaware and work at nearby Nuclear Power Plant ------

Shailesh Singh

Jun 27, 2014
03:21

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Hello Robert, Its really a great idea. Regards, Shailesh

Tom Morris

Jun 30, 2014
07:58

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adding my support.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 1, 2014
11:42

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It has been about one year to the day today, that this concept was dismissed by the judges of the 2013 transportation category. There was no appeals process, though I tried. That pretty much makes my reentry here this year an appeal, doesn't it? And the 142 other supporters so far would more or less represent petitioners that the appeal be heard. Considering the fact that although most long haul, intercity trucking is accomplished by class 8 (tractor-trailers), yet essentially all parcel and local delivery routes are served by much smaller trucks... Will the idea of using a small vehicles for small payloads again be rejected? Would we ever (let alone before 1970,) have made it to the moon if the lunar orbit rendezvous mission mode had been forever rejected? If there are any objections, I would prefer an opportunity to address them before the semifinalist selections have been decided. I know this is all very directly worded, but these matters do warrant very clear communication.

Saravanan Dhalavoi Pandian

Jul 2, 2014
03:38

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Hi Robert, Interesting concept and the comments you get proves that!! I just think it would be great value addition to your proposal if you add some clarity on: 1. The proposed technology you would recommend to use for transferring the materials / parcels. I have heard about pneumatic delivery / belt conveyors in industries. I guess home delivery would require much more sophisticated system and any description you add would be great! 2. The technology (software and hardware) to sort, select, communicate, transfer over complex concrete jungles we have now needs some explanation. The analogy of electricity and water is great, but in those case we know that the characteristics of the material we transfer is constant and can be controlled. For Cargofish, there is huge amount of variability (size, weight, temperature, state, fragile etc.) and I expect the technology to be more complex. 3. It would be really useful if you can estimate (i) cost of the technology you propose for installing Cargofish for a small community usage (ii) the amount of energy / carbon saved (iii) what would be payback - you know people would like to see some numbers to get things attractive!! 4. Social aspects - I guess people would generally like to feel the product before they take the decision to buy it - this is one of the challenge for online shopping - and it would take years to break this mind set!! All the best, Saravanan.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 6, 2014
08:55

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Hi Saravanan, Thanks for your comments. I have been too busy to have replied sooner, but will get to it now. I will respond in numbered format: 1. I intend to wait until the proposal is advanced before divulging too much detail. Guessing that the solution is complex though, amounts to jumping to the wrong conclusion. It is actually very simple. 2. The control scheme is also very simple. Expectations of high complexity are overblown. 3. The estimated cost per mile is given in the proposal, as is the comparative energy savings, but I will revisit and make them both more clear. Same goes for the value return. 4. The percentage of goods ordered online vs brick and mortar retail goes up every year. When people buy groceries, they are buying an unopened decorative package, with an expectation of what is inside. When people order pizza delivery, they are specifying something unseen. There is nothing to substantiate that there will be any difficulty in getting people to use the system, in fact the opposite is true. Recently, in East Asia, a grocer began offering billboards in the subway for people to order their groceries using their smartphones. Customers simply scan the code and specify the quantity. It has been an immediate success, and expansion is in progress. It may seem that I am not appreciative of your feedback, but that is not the case. It is the case though, that I have already heard and responded to every single concern brought up anywhere in this entire forum. I intend to use the comments provided, including yours, in doing one final revision of the proposal. Thanks again, Robert

Eric Dargy

Jul 11, 2014
03:52

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Hmmm. Studying. Studying. But not so clear. I sense your excitement but it is brewing just beyond hype. Looked at your website which had surprisingly little actual information. It would be great to see a drawing/sketch/ etc with materials, etc. After going to four different websites looking for info and watching your indiegogo video I am left without a clear picture. But let me tell you, underneath this confusion is a very cool idea. So please please bring it out.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 11, 2014
06:38

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Thanks for the inquiry, Eric. I sent you a private reply with a little more clarity on the high level system design. I may go ahead and put up a photo of an early test vehicle, and tighten up the proposal text a little bit. Just another little teaser... if you calculate mileage the same way that the US EPA specifies for electric cars, then the vehicles in the CargoFish system, though their payload capacity is only 16 lbs, would get around 18,000 mpg. (specific energy consumption of 2 Whr/mile) As for the need for a system like this... I have done a lot of research, all of which is repeatable. For instance, go to any Walmart store and observe the nature of the purchases the shoppers are carrying out of the store. You will see that about 2/3 of them have only one little flimsy plastic shopping bag with something about as big as a canteloupe inside. Of the remaining third, they are almost evenly split between shoppers having just a few bags across the bottom of a shopping cart, and shoppers having about one full shopping cart. Odd size and shape objects are the exception, not the rule. So these shoppers then proceed to toss these things into an average 4,000 lb vehicle and motor off. Those having picked up ten or more items would consider it a trip that was much more justified than for only one item. In reality, given that technology is available today to make this kind of wasteful transport obsolete, the only justification is that such an option is not yet available to them. How much longer they have to wait for this option is a thing that is not just up to me... it is also up to all of you. I am working to make it a reality as fast as I possibly can. Don't you think the whole thing could be developed faster if I weren't still working alone? On my family vacation budget? I hope that everybody who reads this will realize that it is well worth supporting, and vote their conscience. Thanks again, Robert

Eric Dargy

Jul 12, 2014
10:56

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Yes, I understand the problem. Clear as day. Solution, no. I don't see it at all. Are these google autonomous cars, drones, railways. I'm just seeing Rube Goldberg. And please don't PM to this CoLab system because it doesn't appear to be working.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 12, 2014
10:39

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You may be able to read your PM's from the copy forwarded to your email on file. Yes, the solution is drones in and enclosed network of energized tracks. Similar to model trains, or slot cars, but also like radio controlled cars and Google self-driving cars. That's it. Simple, reliable, and from a total cost of ownership analysis, very inexpensive compared to any other means of accomplishing the same goals. I tried yesterday uploading a few illustrations, but this Colab is still a bit buggy and the uploads could not be saved into the proposal. If you would like... fill out the contact form at CargoFish.com, and I will provide you more detail in private, even over the phone if you don't mind. I am well aware of the plethora of unworkable schemes being advanced by well meaning but misguided inventors that want to be innovators, and at times this circumstance causes my solution to be too well camouflaged. This is one of those times.

Eric Dargy

Jul 13, 2014
08:23

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Well you can load the images to your website and then link to them from the proposal's main page. Easy. And in your case a picture might be worth a million words, because in the second comment above, your post, even the idea of what a drone is gets confused. What is an enclosed network drone? is it flying in a tube. Is it not flying at all? Bring us up to speed please. Again I find the core of the idea exciting (an internet for physical goods) and I think that is great...not fully original (Amazon UPS etc)...but if you can change the game here with some novel design well then I'm very curious. Unfortunately even as an engineer I can't understand what you're really saying.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 13, 2014
09:53

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That's not going to work because my website is so far only a Godaddy Instant page. I am on a low budget. If you Google "cargofish" for images, you can discover about 6 - 10 images hosted between Indiegogo and Fundrazr. They really don't do it justice though. All of them are from earlier periods in the project. Let me just explain a little more here: This concept is a network system of enclosed track. I would describe subways as enclosed track systems, too. The vehicles are autonomous. I would call Google's self-driving car autonomous, too. That's really the biggest part of the description. Since the vehicles are only about 10 lbs empty and up to about 26 lbs fully loaded, it does not take much energy to propel them, especially since they are simply rolling on a track. Compared to using a typical automobile for shopping and other errands, this offers about two orders of magnitude reduction in energy consumption. Plus... nobody is doing any driving to move these payloads. This means people who cannot drive, for whatever reason, can still shop in real time. I recruited a young engineering student from a local college recently, Patrick. He posted comment 52 in this thread. We just got together on the project for only the second time last night, and will be meeting again next week. The current focus is on the patent application, so that the type of details that you are interested in can be revealed publicly. I appreciate very much that you are an independent thinker, and question what you hear and read. To avoid having you wait until the patent before learning more, I invite you to contact me via the form on my web page, www.cargofish.com, and we can establish a non-disclosure agreement. Then I can tell you about the innovative solutions to certain specific problems that must be solved in order to succeed with a scheme such as this.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 14, 2014
06:28

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Eric, Question... Aren't you more or less holding me to a higher standard than the other proposals you are supporting? I have provided what information pubicly that I can, and offered to explain more privately. I have not seen or heard any reply from you though. Just wondering... Robert

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 15, 2014
06:51

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Some interesting observations: When people first hear the idea that it would be easier to transport small payloads with small vehicles, some just don't believe it. "Give me proof!" they demand. I suggest to them repeating a simple experiment: Go shopping in any store using a shopping cart, and fill it as much as you care to. After paying, and transfering the goods to your car, push the car home instead of using the engine. If there is no basis that small vehicles are easier, then it should be as easy to push the car as it was to push the shopping cart. Some people exclaim, "That would have been a good idea had it been thought of before we built everything." Have we built everything already? Is there no construction going on? How did we add the Internet? Others say, "We can't even keep up on the maintenance of the infrastructure we have now." So I ask, "Is your electricity out? Have you no water? Is your sewer backed up?" Curiously, the answer is always no, yet they insist that the system is broken! Still more focus only on failure, saying "What do you do when it breaks?" My reply is, "That's when we fix it!" Is that really too vague? Several have suggested that I make changes to my proposal. To them perhaps it is not good enough, or maybe they are just trying to point out ways that its chances of advancing can be enhanced. I think that if this proposal could be rejected from advancement as is, then there is no reason to consider engaging this forum again. For me, having first found and entered this competition a year ago in its previous iteration and been rejected, this continues so far to be an incredible test of patience. It is easier for the rest of the world because the vast majority of them have no idea just exactly what they are missing out on while development and implementation drags on for lack of resources.

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 16, 2014
01:48

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Update: CargoFish Physical Internet responded to the US FHWA RFI DTFH6114RI00007, and I just received word that we are invited to give a presentation on the concept and technology at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA. This conference is being held concurrently both there, and at the Department of Transportation offices in San Francisco, CA. This is news that I know all of my family, friends, and supporters will be happy to hear.

Steven Williams

Jul 16, 2014
02:24

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Congratulations on the invite to the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA. I know they will be "Blown Away" when you share the details of your concept and technology relating to your CargoFish Physical Internet.

Antoaneta Yotova

Jul 20, 2014
12:53

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I find the many updates of CargoFish proposal to have made it really better and competitive, so I wish it is submitted in time today, then - success in the competition!

Robert Dedomenico

Jul 20, 2014
09:07

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Dear Antoaneta, You have stepped right in an contributed significant value to this effort, in prompting me to make important refinements. Some of me just wanted to let it fly as it was, for this stage, and let refinements all wait to be done only if advanced. I have instead made a few passes, adding pertinent information based on your recommendations, and even if I did not address them all (I go by memory so much,) I have addressed at least some of them and perhaps a few others not even pointed out. So what I wish to say is... for your help and encouragement... THANK YOU! Yours, Robert

Antoaneta Yotova

Jul 22, 2014
10:28

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Until when have we to keep fingers crossed for the success of CargoFish proposal?

Marie Pollard

Jul 23, 2014
05:30

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Hi, I like your idea but I am not sure what kind of vehicle you are proposing to deliver products. Also, if I understand correctly, there would need to be a massive warehouse to have all supplies and if we speak of pharmaceutical subscriptions, some security is imminent. It also sounds like this is hard to receive approval based on a reduction in business. The big companies may outweigh the small ones trying to gain marketing value for their product in a sea of big supply companies. There is a point above about the drones that Amazon wants to put in place next year. Would that be a step in this direction?

Elaine Dedomenico

Jul 23, 2014
06:15

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Hi Antoaneta, Robert's account has been locked by the staff for having a discussion in one of the discussion threads, so cannot respond to any members via this comment board, the private message system, or discussion threads. It will be unlocked only if this proposal is advanced as a semi-finalist, and then only for the period allowed for updating the proposal. He has always found it difficult to back down from a debate. So if you need to converse before then, and don't mind using email but don't want to make yours public, he asks that you send him a message via the contact form on his web page, www.cargofish.com, or use the Colab PM system, as those are still being forwarded to his email. Hi Caro, Robert says thanks, and welcome to the team! As stated above, he should be able to converse via the Colab PM system during the upcoming proposal update period, provided CargoFish is advanced. Hi Marie, If you would like more information before the proposal update period you will have to use the instructions above, and Robert will be happy to provide more detail for you. He has turned our garage into an amateur machine shop, and the prototype he has assemble so far is really more than I can explain. Thanks, Elaine

Climate Colab

Aug 5, 2014
08:33

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The concept is interesting but lacking details on the actual mechanism for delivery. Without the details, one can only infer it is a terrestrial-based drone system. A drone delivery system is obviously of interest with Amazon’s air-based system being the most noteworthy of late. The expectations for this to affect climate should be fairly modest. The vast majority of freight ton-miles traveled is not consumed in the end-use shopping and pickup. Some people actually choose to drive to a mall or shopping area instead of ordering online. The amount of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) that would be displaced by the concept would be small compared to overall VMT and the overall GHG impact minimal.

Elaine Dedomenico

Oct 22, 2014
08:55

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You did not have to infer. The proposal explicitly stated that it was a track drone system. What you would have had to do to have advanced this proposal was to think, and learn. Transportation 'experts' that have no clue about the FACT that in the distribution of goods, less than half of the energy consumed is in the first 99% of the total ton-miles taken from point of production to point of consumption, and the rest on that last 1%. You are not competent to judge.

Gary Krysztopik

Nov 21, 2015
08:17

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There are thousands of new lightweight electric vehicle designs that are constantly creating new categories between bicycle and motorcycle, motorcycle and car, and all kinds of foldable scooters.  My only comment is to keep in mind that there will be a lot of personal urban mobility vehicles in the near future.  We wouldn't want to design around the current car and bicycle system.  These vehicles will displace a lot of cars so that lanes can be taken for bike/micro EV's which will completely change our current road system (for the better).  We should, dare I say, *change* the world!


Gary Krysztopik

Nov 21, 2015
08:05

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ooops - it posted my comment to another project.  Discard the previous post.

My comment here is - please keep me in the loop for vehicle design.  We have overlap with my project.  Whether air, land or sea, I want to deposit my two cents into the prototyping and manufacturing process.


Gary Krysztopik

Nov 21, 2015
08:41

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Actually, another idea I keep pushing is related to my other comment above and has overlap with this project to - micro EV highways.  I would love to see roads taken back from cars and trucks and dedicated to bicycles and micro EV's (electric bicycles, scooters, NEV's, etc.  This mini highway idea might include little autonomous micro EV delivery vehicles.  I see it.

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