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Mark Johnson

May 17, 2014
07:55

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Fantastic narrative with real results and time value. Makes me want to be a representative in the Maryland area. Amazing facts about BTUs needed to produce cement. 3D printing is the wave of the future already here, so matching this technology with Hempcrete is an absolute winner! Great Going! Mark

Chad Knutsen

May 17, 2014
03:53

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Many thanks Mark! I would definitely like to speak further about how we might work together. A gentleman of such experience and expertise as yourself would be an incredible asset to a project like this. I am beginning to prepare a business plan, projections etc for the first build. As I prepare the business plan, I can imagine that having your name and bio attached to it would not hurt our chances of securing funding/material/tech contributions. WI really want to flesh out an A-Team (as it were), of the right heads and hands to get this done. If you know some folks who would be interested in collaborating as well, I am certainly open to the em joining the conversation too. Thanks again, Chad "EST SICUT COGITAVI, ERIT UT PUTATIS.

Doron Bracha

May 19, 2014
11:30

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Interesting proposal. Hempcrete has great potential: http://www.treehugger.com/green-architecture/hempcrete-startup-kickstarts-revolution-sustainable-green-building.html Here's one caveat, though: "The United States is the only industrialized nation on earth that bans the production of industrial hemp, thus we're unable to utilize it in a cost-effective manner as it must be imported." Also, 3D printing sounds exciting and innovative, but for practicality and economy, it may be better to use simpler methods, similar to casting concrete blocks. Cheers and good luck !..

Chad Knutsen

May 19, 2014
02:29

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Thank you Mr. Bracha for your input! And the link you posted is a great one for introducing folks to the hemp issue! As per your caveat, which up until now was indeed an issue that would make hempcrete etc to be difficult to procure economically since it is primarily imported. However now, since the new federal farm bill was passed, and according to the equal protection clause in The Constitution, anyone in any state can grow hemp if they are competent enough to prove the legitimacy of their constitutional claims and get their hemp in the ground like Ryan Loflin did. Also, since MIT for example, is a qualifying "institute of higher education". A research project to grow hemp and cultivate it would be completely legal as long as it was sanctioned by said "institution of higher education.". ..SEC. 7606. LEGITIMACY OF INDUSTRIAL HEMP RESEARCH. (a) In General- Notwithstanding the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (20 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), chapter 81 of title 41, United States Code, or any other Federal law, an institution of higher education (as defined in section 101 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001)) or a State department of agriculture may grow or cultivate industrial hemp if-- (1) the industrial hemp is grown or cultivated for purposes of research conducted under an agricultural pilot program or other agricultural or academic research; and (2) the growing or cultivating of industrial hemp is allowed under the laws of the State in which such institution of higher education or State department of agriculture is located and such research occurs. ... RE: 3d printing not being as economical or feasible: 3d printing sounds very complicated. And very expensive. Because it is a relatively new process in the realm or manufacturing. However, thanks to folks like RepRap, and BigRep, and the Open Source Ecology Movement, folks can build 3d printers in many sizes, customized for the printing of nigh any material. Also, I totally see your point. Printing huge structures with huge printers mightn to be the most economical method. What about printing a bunch of smaller (maybe 5' hempcrete triangles) and then fitting them together tightly with some more hempcrete as mortar. It would all still petrify together eventually, and it would be very economical for even a small construction crew to manage most if not all of the project. 3d printers are not as confuddling or are xpensive as one might think necessarily. Thank you again for chiming in! ..

Doron Bracha

May 20, 2014
10:17

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Chad, Thanks for the additional info. I'm glad to hear that hurdles are being removed and that hempcrete can move forward. It clearly has great potential and advantages over other building materials. Here's an interesting example of a project in Florida: http://hempcretehouse.coffeecup.com/ Cheers !..

Matt Engelmann

May 27, 2014
03:40

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Hello Chad, This is an interesting idea. One of our engineers showed me a video of a USC 3D printing project using concrete that he thought was interesting: http://www.contourcrafting.org/ Our core competencies are masonry composites and bast (hemp in this case) fiber composites. The projects referenced above were constructed using our (Tradical Hemcrete) materials. So the processes are developing from both from a materials and equipment perspective. There will be significant technical challenges to overcome related to the hemp aggregate + ? binder masonry composite (hempcrete) material properties during casting and initial (hydration)curing.

Chad Knutsen

May 28, 2014
12:02

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Thank you for joining in, The contour crafting process is one interesting method indeed. What I had in mind however would be to print out smaller triangle sections from a hemp plastic (with a structure not unlike: http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2013/02/dezeen_ProtoHouse-2-by-Softkill-Design_ss_2.jpg), and then snap them together into a larger structure. Then the rest of the hempcrete could be "printed" onto the mesh, and fill in the gaps. Leaving us with a very tough structure. And when it comes to processing hemp and lime...consider this technology if you will: http://vortechunlimited.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/vpur-brochure_v1.010714.pdf I would love to hear your thoughts on what the quality of the hempcrete would be if the VPU were used to process the hemp and the lime into the perfect particle sizes. And use very little energy to do it... Also, in terms of the issues you foresee, I would very much like to hear more. Constructive criticism is what I need. keep 'em coming. Many thanks. Chad

Chad Knutsen

May 28, 2014
12:39

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The link I posted first was incorrect. here is the correct one: http://static.dezeen.com/uploads/2013/02/dezeen_ProtoHouse-2-by-Softkill-Design_ss_2.jpg

Chad Knutsen

May 28, 2014
12:42

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One of the creators and patent holders of the VPU is a personal friend, so when the time comes to begin processing samples, we can get it done quickly and cost efficiently.

Mark Johnson

May 29, 2014
04:12

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Hello Chad. I was curious to know what key US "standards institutions" were interested in Hempcrete and 3D Printing. Certainly a Hempcrete home or structure must be built "to code" with materials properly designed, developed and operationally tested. I live about 5 minutes from the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and have been there many times plus know some people there. So I thought I'd do a "Hempcrete" search on the NIST Materials Science and Environment/Climate Portals. 1. Nothing found on the Materials Science Portal URL: http://www.nist.gov/materials-science-portal.cfm Then I turned to what NIST had on "Concrete"....I found quite a bit.....check out these 2 NIST URLs, the second is a Cement Virtual Testing Laboratory!! 1. http://www.nist.gov/search-results.cfm?q=concrete&btng=Search&num=10&sortType=L&scopeType=0&datefrom=&dateto= 2. http://www.nist.gov/el/building_materials/inorganic/vcctl.cfm Then I went to the ASTMI: 1. http://www.astm.org/ABOUT/overview.html ASTM has the following Concrete testing standard and many others using "concrete" as the keyword: ASTM C1077 - 14 Standard Practice for Agencies Testing Concrete and Concrete Aggregates for Use in Construction and Criteria for Testing Agency Evaluation 1. http://www.astm.org/Standards/C1077.htm Shifting topics to "3D Printing" I found quite a bit at NIST and none at ASTMI. Here are the NIST links - impressive Grant possibilities and POCs for collaboration! Here you go Chad: 1. http://www.nist.gov/director/3dgrant.cfm 2. http://www.nist.gov/search-results.cfm?q=3D+Printing&btng=Search&num=10&sortType=L&scopeType=0&datefrom=&dateto= Above is a first "governance framework" swag of sorts - hempcrete requirements and production must comply with established standards and testing as well as meet customer form, fit and function expectations. Will continue looking at the FL article and more. Thank you. Onward! Mark

Chad Knutsen

May 29, 2014
04:34

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Amazing resources Mark, many thanks. I'm going to play with this stuff a bit and post further. Above and beyond sir.

Chad Knutsen

May 29, 2014
07:52

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I am very curious if anyone here has experience with non-Newtonian fluids (STF etc). I feel like adding some VPU processed silica solutions to he hempcrete mix could potentially greatly increase the impact strength. Thoughts? With that in mind, check out this... http://www.nist.gov/mml/msed/polymers/dispersions.cfm

Chad Knutsen

May 29, 2014
07:30

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Also, this will come into play. We could in theory, print out batteries to store power for this structure. Also made of hemp... https://www.asme.org/engineering-topics/articles/energy/hemp-carbon-makes-supercapacitors-superfast

Mark Johnson

May 29, 2014
08:19

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Heavy Duty Technical. Awesome. Take a look at this - "Click Open": http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CEMQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitool.library.mcgill.ca%2Fthesisfile104531.pdf&ei=sdCHU-WGCe3IsAT81YH4Bg&usg=AFQjCNGNM27MWYRipubT_vqx7h5A4hmumA&bvm=bv.67720277,d.cWc

Chad Knutsen

May 29, 2014
11:25

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Heavy duty indeed. Great white paper. We need to set up a list of obstacles, the expertise needed to overcome them, and then find an expert, or passionate and competent student in each respective field who wants to take on each one of the challenges. I generally see my role as a big picture character, connecting the dots betwixt experts, technologies and theories across many industries, so as to facilitate the advancement of projects conducive to the following: The Free Order of Treemasons has no boundaries to be defined, everywhere under the sun, moon, and stars is campus. Anyone willing to do what it takes to pick up the crown and place it on their own head is already one of us. It is not a country, it is not a nation, it is a free and border-less collective for a new age. Although the prime directive of the all Treemasons is indeed to cut the bonds of an old order, we must avoid becoming tied to the trees we tend, lest we wind up hanging from them. As such, Treemasons wear no illusions of immortality, all things must pass, and with them, the dogmas of an age whose time has ended, and the blinders that have kept us from realizing who and what we are; Kings and Queens, in our own right, with no one to govern but ourselves. We recognize that faith is simply a personal overstanding with the universe, and all belief systems are welcome here. So long as you do not infringe upon the rights or properties of another, you are welcome to do, as you please here. If you seek knowledge and dream of a day when the focus of mankind is innovation and liberty, rather than the inundation of tired dogmas, the suppression of progress, and the accumulation of imaginary wealth; you will do well here. No Man or Woman need explain why they choose to live free, the reason is self evident by its own nature. There is a time for everything, and everything in its time. A new world is possible, where freedom IS free, and it's time has come. -- If this resonates with anyone who comes by this page, saddle up and let me know how you would like to get involved. If you have a specialty, or expertise that could be an asset to this project, We humbly ask that you chime chime in. The interest in this endeavor is growing swiftly. Many thanks, Chadith

Priti Ambani

May 29, 2014
11:04

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Hi Chad. Thank you for your contribution. The focus of this contest is to generate demand for green buildings within communities. Though the 3D Hempcrete sounds like a great technology, I am not sure how it builds a general understanding on the need to green our built environments. Your proposal is heavily focused on one material while we are looking to build a holistic demand for low impact, healthier buildings through education and awareness. Thank you for taking the time to enter the contest and good luck on your project!

Chad Knutsen

May 30, 2014
12:39

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Hi Enviroterian, thank you for your thoughts. Like you said: "...we are looking to build a holistic demand for low impact, healthier buildings through education and awareness..." within communities. Well there is no better way to make a community aware of the beautiful sustainable future that is right at our fingertips, than to build real, feasible examples of that future right in front of them. For example, lets say we form a Hempcrete Home Community Trust, and use the funds raised to acquire lots of land in population centers, and build these 3D printed hempcrete future houses right in front of them. Open them to the public on certain days, let the people see how its done, how easy it is, how much better it is for the environment, and not to forget, how much cooler it looks (and that does matter to a majority of folks). Better yet, go into communities beforehand, and find folks who want to help out on the build, to get communities directly involved in building community centers etc, out of this material, and utilizing the other new technologies we will employ in these first few pyramids. Mark "Ecoelite" wrote me earlier and made another very good observation: "...Nobody in the Millenium Generation (and its successor generations) will want to buy a “Colonial Home” with the fake shutters, inefficient HVAC units with forced air ducts, low U factor windows, etc. The future home buyers want Hempcrete!" -- I gan guarantee that with or without my connections in Media, these 3d printed hempcrete pyramids popping up all over the country will cause a buzz. People will want to know the whos whats whens wheres and whys, and we will make sure all that information is incredible available. That is how we get people excited about the environment...not by catchy phrases marches or tv commercials etc...Not by asking people to be the change, but by being that change ourselves. By getting our hands dirty, and building our own destinies, and not just one brick at a time anymore...

Shayne Korithoski

Jun 2, 2014
10:15

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I'm curious what binder or process you are planning for making the hempcrete both structural and thermal, or are you? There is a sweet spot here. Most hempcrete actually has a very low compressive strength as its made to be a non-load-bearing bio-masonry insulation. Also, most hempcrete on the market comes from Europe, and the process has evolved using European NHL. There are pozzolans that can work with the lime we have in North America, but most people use fly ash, and there are huge issues with fly ash, being a by-product of coal. In terms of 3D printing, I know most sprayed on hempcrete actually has lower shiv in the mix, to prevent getting gummed up in the machines. I really think the future of hempcrete is prefabrication. I've been working on this with a group in Canada, using all local materials. Mostly the issues are just the huge financial undertaking to get it certified.

Chad Knutsen

Jun 3, 2014
12:22

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Hi Shane, welcome to the conversation. The hempcrete we will produce will be Structural, as our lime and hemp stalk will be processed down to sub-micron sized particles, using a proprietary technology that uses resonant frequency and air pressure to "tease" apart the molecules of the material. This tiny particle size will allow for 1, more rapid petrification into hempstone, and 2, greater density, and increased strength. Also, since the material will be more viscous due to the smaller particle sizes, it should be much easier to distribute via an appropriate printer. However we do not intend for the hempcrete itself to be the only structural componant of course. We will print our a honeycome-ish frame of the building (not unlike the structure of bone) put of hemp plastics. Then we would "print" the hempcrete into the frame, filling the gaps betwixt the hemp plastic. We do not intend to use any mateirials that are currently commercially available. The whole idea of this project is to use processes and materials that we COULD and Should be using everywhere, so that rather than just seeing what is, the People will see what might be. I would very much like to hear more about your project up in Canada with Renewhaus Solutions. Many thanks again, Chad

Robert Dedomenico

Jun 4, 2014
12:22

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Chad, I cannot say that I have fully investigated your project and expect every success, but I will say that you know more about the subject than I, and that it appears you may just be onto something. I wish you success. Robert

Dennis Stelmack

Jun 8, 2014
06:12

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Einstein, said that the definition of insanity was doing the same thing over and over again. Sometimes the best solutions to our problems are to make them simple. I like how you think outside the box. Best of luck Dennis

Dan Whittet

Jun 17, 2014
10:51

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This proposal seems to have caught on quickly, there is something exciting about the use of any organic materials that involves photosynthesis and biomass. Maybe you could, as mentioned above, extend your proposal into a complete cradle to cradle advocacy for plant based materials in buildings. Hempcrete, Wood, Mushroom Spores...Goat based spider steel. Take it to the max.

Chad Knutsen

Jun 17, 2014
12:41

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Funny you should say that. My other proposal (in progress) aims to utilize many biomass materials and alternative tech to build a ladder out of the imaginary "scarcity paradigm". If you could send me any info you have on goat based spider steel, that would be great! Haha. Thank you for your support!

Mark Johnson

Jun 17, 2014
08:25

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Hello Chad. I am mailing our packages to the EPA tomorrow. Sorry to miss you in CA to discuss Hempcrete. Let's Keep charging. Mark

Chad Knutsen

Jun 18, 2014
02:59

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Great to hear Mark! Bummer indeed that we were unable to link up out there. But there's always next time. Could you email me the final package you send the epa for my records? Also, I am looking into reaching out to a company who produces cement drainpipes for infrastructure and that sort of thing, to see about how we could utilize the ideas in this proposal to streamline and economize their workflow and improve their product. Stay tuned for more on that. If anyone on this board has connections within the cement industry or construction industry, feel free to introduce them to us so we may see how this project can be accelerated. Cheers, CK

Mark Johnson

Jun 19, 2014
06:24

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OK Chad. Sure. I will scan a copy of the package. I selected the EPA's HQ Office of Environmental Information (OEI) and its Office of Research and Development (ORD). Since the Google Earth project analysis pictures were from GA and OH, I also sent the package to EPA's Region 4 and 5 offices, which have jurisdiction over those States. Drainpipe diversification sounds good! Keep Charging Chad! You are the Man sir. More soon. Mark

Saravanan Dhalavoi Pandian

Jun 19, 2014
04:23

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Hi Chad. Thank you and seems like a ground breaking technology to replace the usage of Cement. It would be great to add the following details to promote this concept within the public: 1. The cost benefit of constructing the buildings using the 'Hempcrete' - will using 'Hempcrete' will be cost effective than Cement 2. What will be the operating cost of the building (energy cost) of a 'Hempcrete' building vs. normal cement concrete building

Chad Knutsen

Jun 19, 2014
06:43

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Many thanks Saravanan! 1. Yes, hempcrete will be much more cost effective than cement. In the past it was a much more expensive material simply because all the hemp being used had to be imported from china, or romania, or canada. Now that the federal farm bill has slackened its unjust restrictions on hemp cultivation for the most part, the costs will be getting lower and lower. I predict in 5 years, domestic hemp crops will be more common than corn and cotton combined. (just my personal speculation, but it sure looks to be headed in that direction quickly). The equipment and materials required to cultivate and process hemp into hempcrete is vastly less expensive than the equipment and materials to dig huge gaping holes in the earth to mine stone and lime, and other minerals used in concrete... 2. I will have to work that out, I'm sure much research has already been done on this that we can pull from as a starting point. SInce we plan to create much finer particles of both hemp and lime than are normally possible with traditional marerials processing, we will have to do a pretty complete battery of tests to determine the exact operating costs. However, since hempcrete can breathe better than cement/concrete and is a better insulator, I would predict that the operating costs would be lower (if not significantly lower). I will reach out to some pros and ask their experience and then post it here.

Chad Knutsen

Jun 27, 2014
03:20

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Just a thought... This is another interesting avenue to explore in regards to the construction process...It is indeed a bit more complicated than something like a big delta format 3d printer etc. But it certainly allows for some big projects to be managed by only a few folks...And imagine the implications of this being successful on the moon or mars? hmm http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2672135/No-job-big-tiny-robots-Clip-machines-3D-print-buildings-using-giant-pottery-style-wheels.html

Chad Knutsen

Jul 22, 2014
09:28

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So as for this proposal, I would very much like to reach out to the community here to hit us with any questions and issues, and ideas you may have to further the aims of this proposal. This is the CO-lab after all right? There is a lot of genius floating about, lets combine forces and do this right!

Huynh Phu Dat

Aug 14, 2014
08:25

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hi , Mark . My friend , check your email please , did you get my email ?

Mark Johnson

Aug 14, 2014
07:16

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Yes. Thank you. I am going to study the link you provided. You did not fail my friend. Mark

Alex Hick

May 7, 2015
10:22

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Hi, looks like im a little late to this thread. I was just wondering on the Progress of the project, It *has* to be the future of construction and Im glad to see some like minded people pursuing it. I have been looking at launching something like this in Spain, where hemp is legal to grow and the climate is well suited. Anyway, your project looks great and would love to be involved in anyway I can. Alex

Chad Knutsen

May 7, 2015
03:59

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Hi Alex, Very glad to see folks are still interested in this idea. I am still in the process of putting a team together, and securing a site to build our first test structure. Most likely somewhere here in Washington State, California, or Colorado. I think you're totally right about this being the future of construction, the current methods haven't changed much in too long... Cheers, Chad www.pirateacademy.org

Alex Hick

May 14, 2015
07:49

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Hey Chad! Great looking website, pirateacademy. The project pages are loading blank unfortunately at the moment, so cant read about any of your work! But will try again later. What was your first step? I have a field, so im growing hemp. Thought i would try to make some hempcrete first and put it in a press to find out the strengths possible. Im sure this has been done by others before, but i figure it would be a good start to get hands dirty. I might even try to 3D print a working scale model of the 3d printer... Its a big concept and im not sure where to begin! :) Alex

Sara Magalhaes

May 20, 2015
07:31

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Thanks for your proposal! Please dont forget to include the actions of your proposal! Good work!

Vishal Bhavsar

Jun 7, 2015
09:25

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Hello, One more interesting work. Current days most of the urban development happens vertical. Can this 3D printing Hempcrete be used to do this vertical construction. This can be real breakthrough if this can work for new urban markets. Regards, Vishal

Maryette Haggerty Perrault

Jun 11, 2015
09:50

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Hello! Thanks for the proposal. If possible, could you fill in the missing proposed actions section of the proposal prior to the deadline on the 26th? I'd also love to see more information on the physical properties of hempcrete (tensile strength, compressive strength, density, give, weather exposure, etc.). Also how do does the 3D printing come into play? Can the hempcrete be 3D printed in small components then be assembled into the larger 60'x60' pyramid base you speak of?

Stevie Harison

Jun 12, 2015
04:21

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Hello from Indonesia, Good luck for your project proposal. Just review and make it completed before meet deadline tomorrow. Thank you,

Leyli Norouz

Jul 1, 2015
05:12

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Good Luck! This sounds amazing. Looking forward to hearing more about the progress of this proposal.

Chad Knutsen

Jul 8, 2015
03:56

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Thank you everyone for your continuing support and input. I have cleaned up the proposal, adding in more onfo RE: the process, steps to completion, current status, more references, a few images etc. Thank you judges for your time in evaluating and providing feedback for my proposal, it was very helpful in refining this project. I did my best to explain the aspects that were asked about the most, such as the method of construction using smaller 3d printers to create smaller segments to be assembled on site. If there are any further questions or comments, please let me know and I will take them under advisement! Things are heating up, so if you approve of this revised proposal, please share it with your social media network and friends, and ask them to click support/vote. Please also keep in mind folks that once the finals round begins, anyone who clicked "support" will need to return and lend their "vote" in order to see this through. Thank you, I look forward to everyones feedback! Chad K.

Dr.martinn. Gormandds

Jul 9, 2015
07:55

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What a wildly interesting idea! I have been doing a lot of online research on alternative building models and this I have to say.... blows my mind!

Brainship Media

Jul 9, 2015
07:04

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We are so stoked to see this proposal gaining momentum and look forward to helping market this once it comes to fruition!

Chad Knutsen

Jul 10, 2015
07:36

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Thank you Dr. Gorman, and Brainship Media. I'm definitely looking forward to developing this further as well. Chad K.

Armin Zadakbar

Jul 13, 2015
11:30

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Very interesting concept! Let's get on a Skype call and I'd like to help you to bring this over here in Europe.

Chad Knutsen

Jul 13, 2015
12:10

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Absolutely Armin. I'll reach out to ye soon! Would definitely like to chat about this. The hempcrete movement is a but furthers long in Europe, and I do feel this concept would be well received there. Cheers, Chad K.

Luke Thomson

Jul 13, 2015
01:39

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Concrete is the most widely used material in the world (Construction_tcm18-114530.pdf) The residental homes would represent a very small portion of the overall market with foundations and wood is already a renewable resource but the argument of longevity is very intriguing. I agree with first researching the physical properties as Maryette commented and from there deciding what the best applications would be: homes, roads, docks, etc The concept of creating, "much finer particles of both hemp and lime than are normally possible with traditional marerials processing" sounds similar to the use of fly ash in concrete: http://flyash.com/data/upfiles/resource/Fly%20Ash%20for%20Concrete%202014.pdf Beyond what others have already done with hempcrete it sounds like the key to this proposal is the "(currently functioning and proven) proprietary technology that breaks down materials utilizing resonant frequency and negative air pressure rather than friction and heat to tease the materials apart long natural structural boundaries." Can you share information on the resonant frequency mill?

Chad Knutsen

Jul 13, 2015
02:10

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Thanks for chiming in Luke. Your expertise is always welcome. I cannot share all the details RE the Mill, but I can share this. http://www.google.com.ar/patents/US20130126647 Hope it fills in some blanks. Also, as for applicability to building infrastructure, that's definitely the direction I would like to take this. I believe that for raising awareness about this concept, building a beautiful residential structure will be the most effective. I have connections to a few major players in the increase infrastructure construction market, and will be keeping them on hand for a sounding board RE the needs/specifications/market trends in their industry. I have introduced this concept to them as a way for them to stay current in a world where more and more people are becoming active in the fight against climate change. They've expressed interest, and hopefully I can get them to provide me some of the 3d models of the under road piping and whatnot that they produce, so that we could create some hempcrete versions to test etc. Chad K.

B W

Jul 18, 2015
08:47

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Hello AFMPPA! I added your proposal to https://www.climatecolab.org/web/guest/plans/-/plans/contestId/1302001/planId/1318803 Please let me know what you think and my best to you!

Chad Knutsen

Jul 20, 2015
04:47

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Many thanks, I am honored you selected my proposal to be included into your plan. I think you've got the right idea indeed. Perhaps your proposal could benefit by adding some more specifics about how the plans you reference could fit together. I'd be happy to chime in if you'd like. Cheers, Chad K.

Preston Hall

Jul 21, 2015
08:47

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Hey chad. Would love to do a quick Skype as well to see where you are with this project. Looking to get involved and help with a hemp project. - Preston

Chad Knutsen

Jul 22, 2015
01:28

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Thank you for reaching out, I am definitely interested in chatting with interested folks such as yourself. I've messaged you my skype details. Chad K.

Wyatt Sanders

Jul 30, 2015
05:44

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Chad, I tried reading your proposal seriously, but it's really hard making sense of it all. The title is: "3D Printing Hempcrete - The People will know what they want once they see it" however you talk about manufacturing hempcrete bricks, which would be more economically and quickly manufactured by molds or extrusions rather than by individually 3D printing each brick: "All hempcrete/hempstone components will be printed in smaller single-man-manageable blocks with a waste-less "skeleton" form, not unlike the way bone is structured, only applying material where it's needed. These blocks can then be stacked together to form the body of the house, and will include space for utilities and wiring etc in the blocks design." You also talked about the use of hemp products to conduct electricity, which would not at all be safe for homes or buildings as hemp is organic material, it is not copper, with insulation. Hemp would biodegrade, and would have an immensely higher resistance to electricity than copper. Using hemp as an electrical conductor in homes at the very least would be impractical, and at the very most would be hazardous. It wouldn't meet the National Electric Code, nor would it be tested or rated for carrying 120VAC, or 240VAC at any ampacity for that matter. Lastly, what actual benefit does using hemp over concrete for construction yield to reducing carbon production? The carbon produced by the concrete industry comes mostly from their reliance on fossil fuels for refining concrete, you likely would have had a greater effect on greenhouse gas emissions if you powered the concrete industry with 100% solar or renewable energy.

Chad Knutsen

Aug 3, 2015
04:01

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Thank you for taking the time to address your concerns. I understand your comments, however if you read once again through the entire proposal, and examined the provided references you may find that I've addressed the issues you've mentioned. a. In the proposal I explain how the concept is to 3d print the initial "skeleton" bricks, as it is the best way to accurately produce the shapes described. We would then use the 3d printed skeleton brick to create molds for mass production as you describe. b. (In a nutshell)Hemp based graphene could absolutely be utilized to store and move electricity around if properly insulated. In fact, hemp carbon nanotubes are turning out to be able to be made into super capacitors that outperform current tech...It may not meed National Electric Code, but its a new material. Sometimes inventions happen than prompt the amending of Codes and Regulations. Before graphene existed, it wasn't rated or approved. But when some folks proved it could work, I am sure some codes were modified to include graphene. I'm not saying my idea is necessarily one of those big idea, but I'm not willing to let it be discounted merely for lack of an official certification etc... c. As for carbon emissions, if you examine the articles I provides as references, Its quite clear that there are numerous sources of greenhouse gasses throughout concretes lifecycle. From the breakdown of chemicals and catalysts used in its composition, to the energy required to apply the massive amounts of heat required, and yes, the transportation, like you mentioned. Also, we mustn't forget that concrete falls apart after only 20-50 years, and then must be replaced. That means all our freeways, and bridges, and buildings, are designed to fail. Which necessitates more production of more concrete, and thus even more CO2. Alternatively, hemp contributes oxygen to the atmosphere, and nitrogen to the soil its grown in, and our processing methods use very little energy. Then, hempcrete actually absorbs (sequesters) CO2 from the atmosphere as it petrifies. End of the day, it absorbs more Carbon Dioxide than it produces, leaving a negative carbon footprint, actually serving to reverse climate change in its own small way. Powering The concrete industry would be cool, but prohibitively expensive, and impractical. Solar requires huge tracts of land, and lots of expensive equipment and materials. Whereas our method, could be implemented with minimal expense of energy and monies. Thank you, did I address your concerns adequately for the purposes of this proposal? Chad

Annalisa Mitchell

Aug 3, 2015
05:53

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Hello, Chad I'm so excited to read more about this project. I am a co-founder of a company called Tribal Ventures International (no web presence yet). If you will need a steady volume of hurd and/or bast at a competitive price, please let me know. Although it will be imported from an international tribal group, we will also be working with US tribes to start growing hemp. Forty tons of coarse bast fiber will be ready within a month. Hurd is available as well. I can send samples. We will also import natural rubber and bamboo, which may be useful for biocomposite research. I'd be happy to share our plans and discuss possibilities for collaboration. A

Chad Knutsen

Aug 3, 2015
05:24

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Hi A, Thank you for reaching out. I would absolutely like to get in touch. This project is definitely in its infancy, however I would very much like to discuss how we may collaborate. I spent about a year in Belize introducing local and indigenous farmers to hemp, and it it indeed a crop that will benefit agrarian folk all around the world as its adoption spreads. Feel free to email me at chadith@gmail.com. I would be very interested to possibly acquire a wee batch of hurds to then micronize along side the micronized lime, and conduct some physical and environmental tests etc. Thanks again, looking forward to chatting, Chad

Annalisa Mitchell

Aug 14, 2015
02:57

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Do you include plans for lifecycle analysis of this technology, specifically focused on the proposed scale using 3-D printing and other mechanized processes? Embodied energy would be important information, too. That's a lot, I know, but high-tech can sometimes contradict the values of low-carbon initiatives, due to the extraction and energy used to create and operate the systems, ya know? Good luck!

Chad Knutsen

Aug 16, 2015
04:27

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Ahoy, thank you for chiming in. Our plan will indeed include lifecycle analysis. As you mention, many high tech processes can be energy and resource intensive (even if they are more "green" ). I intend for this project to avoid such pitfalls. As for scale in RE: the 3d printind system etc. We are investigating and identifying the lowest energy, highest speed (with quality) printers capable of handling hemp based plastics, as well as we will be recording the power usage etc of other parts of our process. Our Milling system uses vastly less energy than traditional hemp processing systems, and operates at the volume of tons per hour if needed. So we can check the energy efficiency "box". I do not intend to have a giant sized printer, but a medium sized (larger than desktop printers), Perhaps more along the lines of the Big Rep One. This unit would be for the printing of the block shapes generated and designed on a computer via the softkill algorithm etc. These blocks would then be easily assembled by hand, have the plumbing and electrical run through them, and then filled in with hempcrete to complete the structure. The hempcrete at this phase could even be applied by hand, or with a traditional cement truck setup etc. Another method we are considering is to print the initial blocks, then use them to create molds for hempcrete "injection moulding", and then create the bricks that way. It will depend a balance betwixt which process creates the highest quality pieces, and which uses the least resources and energy. By keeping the production process simple, and the construction rather "idiot proof", I feel we can make the building of sustainable buildings as easy as legos or an erector set. Hopefully the ease of building will inspire others to get more creative with the aesthetics of their buildings as well. We don't need to be stuck with straight lines all the time anymore. Chad K.

Don Dieckmann

Aug 17, 2015
12:45

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Chadith (Chad K.), I'm still researching the pluses and minuses of Hempcrete or Hemp Stone, and am still sitting on the fence. Hemp-based products seem to be one of the greenest building materials available, and I like its ability to absorb CO2 and resist mold, fire and termites, but it still doesn't appear to have the structural integrity and air-sealing properties of concrete. Since I really believe in ICF construction as the most durable and energy-efficient envelope material, I wonder if hemp plastic could replace EPS foam as the insulated form, while a denser version of Hemp Stone could replace the concrete. It would be the best of both worlds, and maybe both materials could be 3D-printed as you propose. Let's continue this conversation beyond the judges decision on a winner. Good luck (if I don't win!). Don

Chad Knutsen

Aug 17, 2015
10:23

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Let's absolutely collaborate! Methinks your project and mine could gain a lot from one another in sure as we both march onward. Competition and collaboration are not mutually exclusive. Glad you feel the same way haha. I've been made aware of some exciting hemp plastic 3d filament projects in Italy that I am looking into, and am actually headed to the EU tomorrow, and am hoping to make contact with that team while in Rome. Cheers mate, and good luck to you as well. Chad K

Chad Knutsen

Sep 8, 2015
12:52

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Wanted to post this here as I think it an interesting take on the "growing" hemp industry in the U.S. 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/energy/2015/09/150908-hemp-homes-could-get-high-as-cannabis-gets-legal/

also, since my partners and I have the technology to separate hemp fibers efficiently in large volume, I look forward to collaborating with hemp producers to establish a central facility capable of processing the tons of material being cultivated now. I feel this booming industry is about to take off, and look forward to being a part of it with y'all.

Cheers,

Chad

 


Chad Knutsen

Sep 12, 2015
07:50

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Alright mates, we need everyone to share this Proposal all over the internets like crazy. Closing in on the last few hours, and I'm blasting this wherever I can. If you want to see this project become a reality, now is the time to send this far and wide.

Cheers,

Thank you all for your continued support and contributions!

Chad K.


Allen Khoserian

Sep 12, 2015
08:48

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Got your post and will share!

Good Luck!


Chad Knutsen

Sep 13, 2015
12:51

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Thank you everyone for your votes. Now it's up to the judges!

I look forward to their feedback, and to moving forward with this project!

Cheers,

Chad K.


Chad Knutsen

Sep 14, 2015
06:00

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Since I cannot add this to the references, I thought I'd add this here!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14hPeZYqomk


Chad Knutsen

Sep 23, 2015
07:24

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Here is a quick video summary of the project. 

https://youtu.be/jEtx3M-9s6o


Tom Mallard

Oct 7, 2015
11:17

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Designing to the needs of 3d-printing, to introduce people to sustainable industrial views for this growing method if you research it uses about 16% electricity the rest is Joules, heat.

Getting 300C from solar collectors & storing it in thermal-fluids is a slam dunk, replacing the electrical elements in for example a SLS printer is also a slam dunk injection molding uses fluid heating as it's a better source for plastics.

So for me on a small propeller design for go-pro drones that can only be made using digital mfg, to make a million of them takes 125-machines running two shifts biz days only per year and would use 2100-Megawatt-hours per year all-electric.

If one uses solar-thermal for the heat it's 240-Mwh/year, the per unit wattage from 2.1kw down to 340-watts. That's per unit, in this case material costs are nothing, the cost-per-unit to be competitive can't be all-electric.

The principle for industrial processes is to NEVER CONVERT ENERGY, it's not efficient to make electricity to use for heat and that's costly.

All-electric is a no-go for most of my products using plastics for this reason and why the USA can't compete, it's clueless on heat-transfer physics, sigh.


Aeon Phlo

Nov 16, 2015
06:17

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I love this Solution and would like to provide a avenue to beta test it in our market.  We have a company whose intention is to build eco villages with events and on lands what we are purchasing.  We are currently about to close on 1 property of 1000 acres in Oregon and we are working with the leading attorney Courtney Moran to be ready for the when the law will allow us to grow up to 100 acres of hemp.  We then want to begin building our first Transition town for which we have zoned 80 acres already and would really love to do it with a 3 or 4d printer on site utilizing your methods and material. 



Please let me know of any opportunities that will allows to work with you. 

 


Debbie Greene

Nov 24, 2015
03:29

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So glad to see that someone is running with this idea!  When 3D printing first showed signs of having architectural promise, I tried unsuccessfully to get Enrico Dini to come to the US with his giant 3D printer. Unfortunately he was discouraged by the architecture world's lack of interest in large scale printed construction, and I think now he's printing smaller elements.   He might be a good resource for you,  he's a nice guy - pretty free with his information, and very excited about the technology.

  1. http://3dprinting.com/materials/sand-glue/the-story-of-enrico-dini-the-man-who-prints-houses/
  2. http://www.d-shape.com/
  3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L65QKBDQ6mc

Good luck!!


Lia Totty

Dec 24, 2015
07:12

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Congratulations on winning an award within the CoLab. I am interested in cooperative marketing to keep the fuel burning that originally ignited interest in your proposal.

My goal is to use unprecedented sustainable design marketing to promote reinvestment in climate mitigation strategies.

It'd be great to see more support in sustainable design and hemp development research. Let me know what outcome you are moving towards to support your vision.

 

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