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Angélica Lara P.r.

Jun 17, 2014
04:28

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I'm agree with you, nowadays one of the most critical problems related to climate change. Actually i'm coordinating a project of coastal erosion, and the objective is identify the most critical coastal communities of the state and develop strategies to solve this problem. The actions we are proposing are: •Escenarios: •Analisys of: oGeological oHydrometeorological (river flooding, storm surge, waves) oStorm surge (hurricane selection, numerical simulation - bathymetry, mesh,hurac,hg23- ,extremal analysis) •Coastline variation: oField work (beach profiles), Granulometry analysis, numerical simulation With this information we will work in a Program to integrated coastal zone management. Regards!

Mark Johnson

Jun 20, 2014
07:35

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Take a look at this National Geographic article "If all the ice melted! ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map

Mark Johnson

Jun 20, 2014
07:00

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Take a look at this National Geographic article 'If all the ice melted! ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/rising-seas/if-ice-melted-map

Peter Schlesinger

Jun 25, 2014
09:24

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I couldn't agree more with this proposals aims and really believe it needs to go much further than that. I think we ought to urge a moratorium on new coastal infrastructure development that does not take into account scenario development. The proposal could quickly make some geographic markers on how far the waters and associated sea level rise impacts could extend and then request that communities withhold future development within those buffer areas if they do not take into account resiliency requirements. Naturally, this will cause a lot of opposition, but the question of where we're going to be able to put and find the resources for the millions we must move is quite enlightening and startling. We have enormous issues already facing not only poor rural locations, but wealthy urban centers as well. Coastal governments are going to need to create tentative and new multilevel management capabilities across physio-geographic regions presently governed by others to reach out and start to discuss and to determine what currently non-coastal resources might be made available to serve projected impacted populations. I think that we will find that the maps (suggested by previous commenters) of where the water will be due to sea level rise (SLR) will not do justice to the scale of the problem. I believe thus that the proposal should be amended to make its mapping on the basis of the extent of projected resource requirements as opposed to the movements of the water/surge.