Skip navigation
6comments
Share conversation: Share via:

Sardar Mohazzam

Jun 18, 2014
06:11

Catalyst


1 |
Share via:
Hello Marine BECSS - Looking forward to your fully developed proposal. Best

Sergio Pena

Jul 16, 2014
12:56

Catalyst


2 |
Share via:
Would be better if the proposal might be included fully in the system. I have read in a different window and it is a little bit difficult to get the window open, because of certain technical problems. About your proposal. Timely however, difficult to understand the word "protocol". Is it an international treaty or a non binding regulation? In the second case, non bining regulation, how would you get support around the world? Thanks.

Michael Hayes

Jul 19, 2014
04:55

Member


3 |
Share via:
Proposal
contributor
Sergio, Thank you for the input. I've tried to address your concerns on the definition of the word 'Protocol' within the summary section. As to the issue of compelling nations to accept a specific IMBECS like protocol, frankly, that will largely depend on the support the protocol gains within the larger intergovernmental treaty players. If the USG support for an IMBECS initiative can not be established, it may simply come down to raising investment funds and moving forward through commercial means. In simple words, once the IMBECS operations start to show a profit, few nations will 'not' want to have involvement. However, I do hope that proper standards (protocols) can be crafted and widely supported before a vested commercial interest, in large/vast scale mid-oceanic farming, is firmly established. In my most strongest view, the less developed nations should embrace the IMBECS Protocol and become vocal supporters of an IMBECS like initiative at the UN level, and do so as soon as possible. The 'Climate Fund' has been established and the small nations should start a strong effort to engage thate fund on highly specific terms. The Climate Fund website is found at http://www.climatefundsupdate.org/listing Segio, I encourage you to consider championing an IMBECS like approval within your own nation (Chile could use the fuel/fish/jobs). Just one nation, regardless of size, pressing the CoP for treaty support/funds would launch this type of much needed development. Best regards, Michael

Sergio Pena

Jul 19, 2014
10:33

Catalyst


4 |
Share via:
Michel, that is why I am asking you about the word Protocol. The topic has nothing to do with the daly life of people and the threats for life in Chile are related to earthquakes and tsunamies. Climate change is not a priority and a large part of the community understands the complexitiy of the phenomena but it is not interested in solving it for one reason, the community does feel that developed countries do not care about the problem. I will not continue with my explanation, anyway I hope the best to your project. Best.S

Michael Hayes

Jul 22, 2014
05:06

Member


5 |
Share via:
Proposal
contributor
Sergio, the subject of climate change offers up multiple reasons for individuals and the general public to simply ignore it. You mentioned the view that "the community does feel that developed countries do not care about the problem.". That same dynamics can be found in the view that states that Big Business has all the political power and so why should a simple citizen even try to do anything. In simple terms, the leadership factor is simply not working on the climate change issue. However, in today's digital world, we all can be engaged at what is, historically speaking, a high level and do so globally. If we choose to. Let me briefly sketch out how Chile can play a central role in climate change mitigation. As you know, the Humboldt Current runs the length of Chile and is the primary driver of the local weather. And, the development of an El Nino event will change the local weather (rain). Yet, the El Nino will also bring disaster to the local wild catch fishery and thus cause profound economic stress for Chile and its' neighbors. Theoretically, means and methods (see below) could be deployed to mitigate/moderate an El Nino and the S.E. Pacific coastal countries could play a key role in that effort. However, it is clear that an El Nino event is the most complex earth system we now know of and mitigating/moderating an El Nino event would require global level policy/civil society/scientific involvement. Thus, Chile, being physically in a prime technical geophysical position, could be a prime organizer of such a global effort in mitigating/moderating global warming damage around the planet. As to what "means and methods" which can mitigate an El Nino, one first needs to realize that the El Nino Southern Osculation (ENSO) complex of conditions and events pivot around what is called the 'surface effect'. In simple words, the warm Western/Central Equatorial Pacific water is moved (blown) across the Pacific and this phenomenon, to a large degree, is only within the first meter of the surface (i.e. surface effect). With the strategic placement of a large fleet of large scale fuel/food marine cultivation platforms, with surface water cooling ability (which is a key technical factor in the MBECS technology being proposed in this competition), the warm surface water moving across the equatorial Pacific could be intercepted and cooled before accumulating in the E. Pacific. With your legal training and experience, I'm sure you can foresee the complexity of coming to intergovernmental level agreement on such a mitigation (tactical) maneuver. Yet, at this point in time, deployment of such a fleet is completely legal (i.e. not covered by law). Thus, and hypothetically, even the smaller nations, such as the S.E Pacific nations, can play a highly important role in global warming mitigation. As an interesting side note, a fleet large enough to 'cool' an El Nino would be close to the size needed to produce a large potion of the planetary need for a biofuel replacement for all FFs. Sergio, I would be highly interested in your legal view of the above global warming mitigation technical scenario. Best regards, Michael

Michael Hayes

Aug 9, 2014
03:52

Member


6 |
Share via:
Proposal
contributor
In an effort to answer the questions raised in the other contests, which the overall IMBECS Protocol proposal has reached the semi-final level, I've created a Google Doc to help avoid character limitations and provide working links to key references. Many questions being asked about the IMBECS Protocol requires more than simplistic answers. The Google Doc., titled simply 'Response to the MIT Climate CoLab Questions', can be found at the below address. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1acQkkyOKrbovpYr2lcArbCSNKl1rFDA0GgSG_MJayXU/pub The above document will be up-dated until completion of all related contests.