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Robert Bernal

Mar 12, 2013
04:33

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I didn't realize that cement alone accounts for so much of the percent. Anyways, can cement be made stronger by the processes that reduce emissions? If not, we may have to resort to another, more across the board approach: Use the 7C's. Conversion of CO2 into Calcium Carbonate via Carbon Capture Catalyst. Preliminary studies seem promising as this process is basically mimicking the process by which marine life makes shells. Using water and nickel nano particles (in closed loop), it is possible to convert excess CO2 into rock which is much safer than trying to bury it. Therefore, this should become a targeted mandate to be used in the place of (or partially to displace) a carbon tax. Once full scale MINERAL sequestration is made possible by advanced machine automation (of the devices that actually convert CO2 into carbonates and of the devices necessary to collect the clean energy needed, such as large scale solar) humanity could then continue with key activities that must emit excess CO2, such as the steel and cement industries. Therefore, it is best to focus our concentration on developing the machines which can make solar and batteries for dirt cheap (to largely displace coal) and to make the machines that can implement the 7C's (to remove excess CO2 from other sources).

Pia Jensen

Jun 20, 2013
07:33

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I like your concept but would like to see described these: "- Economic: increased rent rates and selling prices, higher tenant attraction, reduced operational costs, protection against volatile prices of energy, reduced liability, increased productivity of occupants." Living in developing countries that use cement for housing for nearly 100% of all development has shown me one thing is very clear: low cost housing is far more attractive to people in these countries than higher cost housing. These countries do not have substantial industry, so asking people to pay higher rates could potentially result in fewer units rented or sold. How does the proposal increase productivity of tenants?

2013cementjudges 2013cementjudges

Jul 4, 2013
02:04

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This proposal calls for a system of standards for the cement industry that would work the way LEED standards promote building efficiency. It calls for creation of language/vocabulary to talk about the CO2 emitted during all phases of the cement cycle. It is an interesting and novel idea, but the proposal itself is lacking in detail on how exactly how such standards might be developed and adopted. The proposal has promise but needs to be fleshed out more: what is the proposal is really trying to achieve, the methodology for how this could be accomplished, and how it would change the game if it were successful. Also, the title might signal the notion of standards/metrics more clearly.

2013cementjudges 2013cementjudges

Jul 29, 2013
03:42

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There were no revisions to the proposal after initial review, so the issues raised then by the Judges were not addressed.