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James Greyson

Feb 13, 2013
08:09

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"The polluted headwaters of the Arctic could potentially bring down the United States of America.." What would be the connection between the pollution and the downfall? Thanks, james

Johnnie Buttram

Feb 23, 2013
11:25

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As an example; if a blowout occurred around the Bristol Bay region of Southwest Alaska, the trickle pollution could effect over 40 percent of the watersheds in the western continental United States. Because Canada's and the U.S.A.'s economies are vulnerable and overlapping, any major disruption of clean water, goods, and services could escalate into fiscal and physical chaos. Thanks again, johnnie

Abdulla Almisnad

Mar 10, 2013
10:57

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Hey Johnnie, Thanks for the proposal. If I understand you correctly you are mainly concerned about making sure that the same kind of blow out that happened in the Gulf of Mexico, won't happen in the Arctic. Thing is as important as the issue of water pollution is, this contest is actually more about reducing the green house gases from oil and gas operations. Maybe if you could review your proposal in that light, that would be great. Thanks Abdulla

Johnnie Buttram

Mar 16, 2013
03:29

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Dear Abdulla, My apologies for not responding in a timely manner, as I have just returned from out of state due to a death in the family. If I remember correctly, due to the adverse conditions and potential fallout concerning the 2010 accidental BP blow-out in the Gulf of Mexico, the world's top engineers converged on Houston, Texas to rectify the situation. In fact, Dr. Michael MacCraken, who was at that time co-moderator of the Google Geoengineering Blog, responsibly and tactfully asked the geoengineering community to step forward and contribute their expertise and innovation to help solve the run-a-way dilemma. Abdulla, like you,I am also very concerned about reducing the green house gases from oil and gas operations. However, I, along with millions of others, are concerned our leaders to easily forget accidental (4.9) million barrel blow-outs of the past and the probable sabotage destined to occur in the future. If our planetary governments and oil and gas leaderships will collectively step forward in a proactive and trustworthy way and definitively state they have in place 24/7/365 emergency teams uniquely trained and equipped to address and make sure these situations will not happen again, the masses would be more at ease. ALSO .. because, thus far, I have submitted the only proposal in this Fossil fuel sector category .. if you do not feel that it has addressed the intent and concerns of what the climate Co Lab had initially intended, you have my permission to disregard my submission if another proposal will better fit your agenda.

Laur Hesse Fisher

May 31, 2013
03:43

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Hi Johnnie, I see your concern on the issue, but I'm not clear what actions you are proposing should be implemented. Do you have some solutions you can add to your proposal to make it more robust?

Johnnie Buttram

Jun 1, 2013
03:16

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Dear Laur Fisher, Beginning May 8, 2010, I sent the major players involved in the ongoing blow-out in the Gulf of Mexico a solution to cap the well with 4 follow-ups which included a post solution how the major players could institute a "Rapid Response Team" to responsibly lift the moratorium on off-shore drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico. When the smoke all cleared, others received credit for the innovations - plus, I have not heard anyone talk about a "24/7/365 Rapid Response Team". ____________________________________________________________________________ It's 3 years later with more talk of drilling in the Arctic. Not wanting to create any controversy - I attempted to use the Fossil Fuel Sector proposal as a tool to find out if there was a proactive "24/7/365 Rapid Response Team" I did not know about. When my response in the Fossil Fuel Sector was underwhelming - I moved on to pursue other issues! Laur, if you or your friends are deeply concerned about the Arctic and would like to receive these solutions with graphics - just send an email to johnniebuttram@yahoo.com and write Coast Guard June 12, 2010 in the subject box . . I will send you a short attachment in the reply. Johnnie Buttram

Pia Jensen

Jun 13, 2013
10:54

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It may be prescient to keep in mind that when certain chemicals mix there is a toxic soup syndrome that occurs which is often beyond humanity's ability to control - this point is important because Russia dumped 17 nuclear power plant products including waste into the arctic. Please ask yourselves, and report back - what happens when nuc products meet oil products in the arctic which is not static and mixes with other oceanic streams (which may be carrying other toxins)?

Pia Jensen

Jun 13, 2013
10:51

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To make my query above pertinent - note these and ponder - no one has proven there is no connection between the gulf blow out and the LA sinkhole: 1) DOTD studying La. 70 detour near Assumption Parish Sinkhole www.katc.com/news/dotd-studying-la-70-detour-near-assumption-parish-sinkhole/ 2) 0130608-Bayou Corne Flyover #8 onwingsofcare.org/index.php/protection-a-preservation/humanitarian/404-20130608-bayou-corne-flyover8.html 3) Louisiana Sinkhole: State Documentation Reveals that Radioactive Materials Were INJECTED into Five Additional Napoleonville Salt Dome Caverns (UPDATED) freedomrox.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/louisiana-sinkhole-state-documentation-reveals-that-radioactive-materials-were-injected-into-five-additional-napoleonville-salt-dome-caverns/ 4) A Plea for SB200 by Mike Schaff lasinkhole.wordpress.com/tag/dow-chemical/ 5) A selection of the latest headlines and must-read articles on issues ranging from fracking to the BP oil spill. - See more at: http://www.stuarthsmith.com/#sthash.wzUvVnyO.dpuf www.stuarthsmith.com 6) Corexit en.wordpress.com/#!/read/topic/corexit Too many loose ends, too many questions, too much pollution & too many lethal combinations (radiation, chemicals, economic, health, ecology). The above urls are just the tip of the iceberg.

Johnnie Buttram

Jun 14, 2013
02:03

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Dear Pia, While reading your comments, I asked myself two questions; Is it too much to ask our leaders to monitor, regulate, and enforce the amount of toxins that continually flows from the Arctic into our rivers and streams that we depend upon for sustenance? Is it too much to ask our leaders to provide a "24/7/365 Rapid Response Team" to be on call to respond to off-shore blow-outs in the future? We, the United States of America, who may lose everything . . must ask these questions and expect a responsible reply! Thank you for your time. Johnnie Buttram

Johnnie Buttram

Jul 6, 2013
06:06

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Dear Climate Co Lab, I recently made a respectfully worded request on my Cloudtec (SRM) (CDR) submission asking the world to compare their best (SRM) (CDR) hybrids on the MIT Co Lab geoengineering table of transparency. Not one entity had the courage to step forward and lay down their cards and compare innovation! Nor did anyone in authority hold their feet to the fire! _______________________________________________________________ What is the responsibility of Climate CoLab concerning the submission titled, "Fossil Fuel Extraction and International Security"? (Please see the above 9 comments.) When smoke and chaos becomes increasingly common, will Climate CoLab be remembered as the original intellectual entity to have responsibly warned our planet and their leaders this was a dangerous possibility? Respectfully, Johnnie Buttram

Laur Hesse Fisher

Jul 9, 2013
06:50

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Hi Johnnie, In the Climate CoLab, we enable the possibility of people passionate about climate change (like yourself) from all over the world to submit and co-develop their ideas on what to do about this complex issue, and have them be recognized by a knowledgeable, global audience. While we would love to have the resources to help develop and implement every idea, unfortunately we are unable to. Therefore we add the contest component so as to help a select number of proposals become realized. We have recruited top experts in their field to select these proposals, who become our contest Finalists and Winners. The Climate CoLab (a very small branch of MIT's) serves as a platform for idea development and a springboard for action and cannot assume responsibility for the development (or non-development) of proposals. The good news is, all proposals are public and anyone who accesses the site can review and contribute to these ideas, and help move them forward, if they find them intriguing. I hope this addresses your concerns! Laur Community & Partnerships Manager MIT Climate CoLab