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Mark Hurych

Apr 20, 2013
11:31

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Hi SamNugent It seems that the benefits of biochar are long-term and carbon negative in effect. I wonder how this kind of ecological upgrade can be made even more effective, maybe even multiplied, by being combined with other technologies. Porous biochar is an excellent home for microbes in soil. Many composting technologies multiply the biodiversity and carbon sequestering effects. Compost tea, composting toilets, Bokashi, and Hügelkultur, among other technologies speed and/or improve the process. In my mind, the best possible use of biochar would be as an inviting home for the bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, rotifers, and protozoa. At least on the land. Perhaps the Veta La Palma fish farm in Spain would have answers for the best development of biodiversity within the river itself. It seems to be such an extreme change for this river system. Mark Hurych

2013ag/forestryjudges 2013ag/forestryjudges

Jul 3, 2013
01:06

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(1) Biochar project is feasible. Some information is provided about prior experience in its use in Olympic Region, technical and economic aspects. (2) The presented approaches are not unusual. They are are already covered by the other earlier project. (3) Very attractive for long-term impact on reducing emissions since Biochar may stay in soil for hundreds of years. (4) Proposal is well presented. It includes a picture of the area but there are no graphics or artistic presentations. Some schematics would help clarify and strengthen the proposal.

2013ag/forestryjudges 2013ag/forestryjudges

Jul 29, 2013
12:26

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Very interesting and creative proposal, but still needs work. Needs a budget, and an explanation of who would do what (only a list of possible cooperators now, when this is massive 60-year undertaking that needs a coalition). Needs better map showing locations; description of the role Biochar would play and what else is needed to regenerate an ecosystem on bare lake bottom after the largest dam removal in US history (would the seed sources be natural influx from erosion and bird and animal droppings etc? or would soils be added somehow and seeds?). Is this feasible? Supporting this would be a start. Fascinating regen experiment. Also needs an estimate of GHG benefits. We highly recommend proposal includes how it would fit into what larger projects are going on -- for example, is US Fish and Wildlife Service or some federal or state agency involved?